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October 24, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-24

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THE WEATHER(
ANN ARBOR-
CONTINUED UNSETTLED
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UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

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VOL. XXVII. No. 19. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS

AILY WILL HOLD
STRAW VOTE ON
CAMPUSTHURSDAY
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES AND
PROHIBITION ARE QUES-
TIONS VOTED ON
FIVE BALLOT BOXES TO BE USED
Students and Faculty Men to Express
Opinions on Current Is-
sues In Vote
Women suffrage, together with all
the other leading issues of the day
will make its appearance upon the
Michigan campus next Thursday, when
a straw vote of the entire campus will
be taken under the auspices of The
Michigan Daily, and the student coun-
cil. Among the questions will be in-
cluded the preference of presidential
candidates, and state-wide prohibition,
in which o t only the students will
partake, but the members of the Uni-
versity faculty will also express their
opinions upon these issues.
Ballot boxes will be placed in the
law building, the Library, University
hall, the engineering building, and the
dental building. The "polls" will be
open next Thursday from 1 until 6
o'clock.
H. E. O'Brien, '17, is chairman of the
committee in charge of the election,
while those acting with him will be
W. B. Steele, '17D; S. S. Atwood, '18E;
C. W. Attwood, '17A; H. L. Kein, '17M,
and D. W. Sessions '17L.
TO GIVE LECTURE ON AMERICA
J. P. Clum Gi es First Talk of Series
Tonight in Hill Auditorium

Late News Briefs
Birmingham, Ala., Oct. .23-
Eighteen bodies have been recov-
ered-B from the Marvel mines,
wrecked by an explosion. With
the death of George Jones, rescuer
who feJ> from a ladder, the death
toll is made 19.
St.. Louis, Oct. 23.-Opposition to
the re-election of Bishop Arthur Sel-
don Lloyd, of New York, as president
of the board of Missions, was crushed
in the house of deputies this afternoon,
and that body concurred in his elec-
tion by the bishops.

CON.STANZA BLACK .
SEA PORT, FALLS
BEFOREBIG DRIVE
ARMY OF VON MACKENSEN HITS
RUSSO-ROUMANIANS FOR
BIG GAIN
CLOSES LINE OF SUPPLIES
Russians Now Unable to Land Pro-
visions on Dobrudjan
Coast Line

Noted Writer to

Speak on

Viexico

Lincoln Steffens Will Discuss Land
Problem of That Country Wed-
nesday Night

Winnipeg, 3lanitoba, fOct, 2?;.-In re-
fusing to grant the request of the
Canadian Pacific Railway for a board
of conciliation under the Industrial
Disputes act, the Canadian govern-
ment this afternpon took a step that
seems to make certain a general strike
of, Canadian Pacific trainmen from
coast to coast, Wednesday.
Chicago, Oct. 23.-Opening of the
grain pits today was marked by intense
excitement, as speculators wildly bid
for wheat. Confident that the long
predicted shortage was now a fact and
that the leading grain would go to
$2.00 before long.
London, Oct. 23.-Speaking at a con-
ference of foreign newspaper men,
Viscount Grey, British foreign secre-
tary, reiterated this afternoon that the
terms of peace must be formulated
only by thenallies action togther. "The
war will not end," he said, "until
there is a guarantee that future gen-
erations will not be subject to such a
terrible ordeal."
New York, Oct. 23.-Cotton jumped
41 to 45 points to record levels in a
wild session on the cotton exchange
today. July delivery selling at 19.19
cents a pound, and surpassing the high
mark set last week.
Mjnneapolis, Oct. 23.--Durham .eat
sold for $2.00 a bushel in the local
wheat pit today. Flour was up 20
cents selling for $9.60 a barrel.

Mr. John P. Clum, of California,
will deliver the first of a series of five
travel-talks on "Picturesque America"
in Hill auditorium at 8 o'clock to-
night.
Mr. Clum has prepared his lectures
with the purpose of inspiring a more
fitelligent and patriotic appreciation
of the American continent. In an ef-
fort to have Americans see America
first he will convey the imaginary
tourist by means of moving pictures
over vast areas of this continent.
Few men today are more familiar
with this continent than Mr. Clum.
who has traveled its length and
breath many times during the last
half century. He has had varied and
interesting experiences Which he will
relate.
The lecture this evening will be on
that part of the country extending
from the Mississippi river to Hawaii,
along the wonderful Apache trail.
The lecture will be given under the
auspices of the Oratorical association,
and the price of admission will be 25
cents.
DAILY STAFF BEATS RECORD
ON M. A. C. FOOTBALL EXTRA
Turning out an extra five minutes
after the last whistle was blown on
Ferry field Saturday afternoon is the
latest feat of the combined staffs of
The Michigan Daily. The best previous
time was eight minutes.
The M. A. C.-Michigan encounter
ended exactly at 4:18 o'clock and the
'first paper was off press just five min-
utes later. In a few seconds a crowd
of newsboys were on State street meet-
ing the crowd as they streamed up the
street. The last paper, making a
2,050 run, was off the press at 5:34
o'clock. At about 6 'o'clock nearly
2,000 copies were already disposed of,
and news stations began to ask for
more copies.
The M. A. C. football extra is an in-
dication of the efficiency of both staffs
of The Daily, and all those who took
part in the record-making edition feel
rewarded for the efforts.

Washington, Oct. 23.-The Eastland
steamship disaster at Chicago was
brought before the supreme court to-
day, when the court agreed to review
the petition of the Indiana Transport-
ation company for a writ prohibiting
Judge Landis, of Chicago, from re-
viewing 374 personal injury cases in-
volving over $3,000,000, growing out
of the collapsing of the big excursion
vessel.
Chicago, Oct. 23.-The Cook county
grand jury late today returned indict-
ments against Chief of Police Charles
Healey, charging him with conspiracy
to commit various offenses. William
Rothardt, secretary to the chief, was
also indicted.
"Y" TRIES FOR NEW MEMBERS
House-to-House Campaign Started
Last Night by Canvassers
All preparations being completed,
the "Y" launched its membership cam-
paign last night. Twenty captains
heading 200 canvassers started out to
make the rounds of the student room-
ing houses and fraternities, and these
men will continue their work until
every student at present not a mem-
ber has been visited.
Penwipers and folders explaining
the field covered by the association
have already been placed in the hands

Berlin, Oct. 23.-Smashing north-
ward along the Black Sea coast, Gen-
eral von Mackensen's German-Bulgar-
ian army has taken Constanza, Rou-
mania's greatest sea port. Official ad-
vices from the war office show that the
Teutonic forces have won the greatest
single victory since the entrance of
Roumania into the world war eight
weeks ago, and German military ex-
perts declare it is the greatest victory
since the beginning of the Somme of-
fensive.
That the Russo-Roumanians have
suffered a disastrous rout and that
heavy fighting still continues is in-
dicated in official dispatches from the
German and Bulgarian war offices. A
dispatch from Bucharest said heavy
fighting was going on about Constanza.
After taking the port of Tuzla in their
advance along the Black Sea coast, the
Teutons swept onward through strong-
ly fortified Roumanian defenses and
after a march of 12 miles in two
days succeeded in reaching Constanza.
The speed of the German-Bulgarian
advance is accepted as an indication
that the Russo-Roumanian forces beat
a disastrous retreat. Effectual closing
of the line of supplies which since the
entrance of Roumania . into the war
has flowed into Constanza from Russia
is concede1. Russia will now be un-
able to supply Roumania with troops,
ammunition or other supplies.
Right Wing Holds Railway.
A 35-mile Constanza-Chernavoda
railway leading across the Danube is
the carrier over which Roumania has
derived a large quantity of her sup-
plies. The Teuton right wing is now
astride that railway at Constanza,
which von Mackensen's center and left
wing are swinging forward to capture
the remainder of the road. The latest
dispatches from the war office indicate
that von Mackensen's left wing is now'
approaching Chernavoda.
London, Oct. 23.-The English wa-
tering place of Margate, 80 miles
southeast of London, was raided by
German air forces this morning, and
three bombs dropped. The Clifton-
ville hotel was slightly damaged and
a man and woman slightly injured. 7
Berlin, Oct. 23.-Beginning yester-
day afternoon and extending far into
last night, the French and English at-
tacked German positions north of thef
Somme between Le Sars and Rai-l
court. The Teutons repulsed all thesef
attacks, except northeast of Sailly,E
where the French penetrated a smallt
trench section.t
s r
]Bucharest, Oct. 23.-Fighting con-
tinues with great violence near Con-r
stanza. The enemy south of Cherna-
voda and Kronstadt has retreated. On
the Transylvanian frontier, the enemyt
was repulsed near Predeal, southwest
of Kronstadt. Roumanian troops re-
captured Mt. Priscal and repulsed
enemy advances in the Topolog valley1
and near Bersa.(

"One of the ablest men ever to in-
vestigate and write of modern sociol-
ogical conditions," was the epithet be-
stowed upon Lincoln J. Steff'ens who
speaks in Ann Arbor Wednesday even-
ing, by Prof. Charles Horton Cooley of
the sociology department"
Taking fr his subject "Mexico, and
the Land Question," Mr. Steffens is
prepared to speak with authority on
this problem, having spent the greater
part of the last two winters in Mexico,
and traveling for three months about
the country with Carranza.
Mr. Steffens has for many years been
a prominent figure in American jour-
nalistic circles, having served as editor
of McClure's, and being now associated
with the staff of The American Maga-
zine. He is also remembered as the
man who was instrumental in bring-
ing about the confession of the Mc-
Namaras in the famous Los Angeles
dynamiting case a few years ago. He
was asked to assist in clearing up the
Folk scandal In St. Louis, and also
lent his help to the civic authorities
of Boston, when that city found itself
in difficulties.
With more than 40 years ot experi-
ence to give him the key to the situ-
ation, Mr. Steffens proceeded to in-
vestigate the land problem of Mexico,
believing that it was also the problem
which has been confronting the United
States. Keeping this in mind, he makes
a comparison which is said to make
clearer both the Mexican and Ameri-
can efforts toward a better state of
being.
The lecture, it is said, will give a
brief but distinct picture of the Diaz
government, a dramatic, inside narra-
tive of the outbreak of the revolt; the
comico-tragic course of the revolution;
the incompetence, corruption, and high
purposes of the revolutionary leaders;
and the dull but simple hopes of the
people. The speaker will outline what
the Mexicans have done and propose
doing, as well as the opposition they
have met both from within and with-
out, and their probable chances for
success.
Mr. Steffens will be introduced by
Prof. Filbert Roth of the foresty de-
partment, and after his lecture will
undertake to answer any question
which might be put to him by the
audience. The lecture will be given
in the auditorium of the Ann Arbor
high school at 8 o'clock Wednesday
night. Tickets may be had at the door,
the admission being 15 cents.
Rush Soldiers to
Chihuahua City
Report Villista Forces Drawing Close;
Carranza's General Trevino
Appeals for Aid
Juarez, Oct. 23. - Re-enforcements
from the Carranza garrison here, are
being rushed to Chihuahua City today,
following an appeal for aid from Gen-
eral Trevino, Carranza commander at
Chihuahua City. The appeal stated
that Villista forces were near the city.
Two' troop-trains were hastily loaded
and started south, with 200 infantry
and 75 cavalry. De facto garrisons
along the lines of the Mexican North-
west railway are also being called into
the capitol.
El Paso, Tex., Oct. 23.-United
States government department agents
here today declared they had obtained
reliable information that Carranzista
forces have sustained a severe defeat
in a two days running fight with Villis-
ta bandits, and that Villista forces
were now only a few miles outside of
Chihuahua City. The call for Car-
ranza re-enforcements from Juarez is

regarded as an indication that the sit-
uation is serious.

ALCOHOL

INCREASES

TAXES

Speaking under the auspices of the
Washtenaw dry -campaign committee,
before an audience of nearly 5,000 peo-
ple Sunday afternoon, William Jen-
nings Bryan gave his reasons for the
abolition of the saloon and the ad-
vance of the cause of prohibition.
Mr. Bryan attacked the proposed
home rule amendment first, declaring
that it was an attempt to confuse the
voter and to take from the counties
already dry, the right to settle their
own condition. By enabling each
township to vote for itself and for
any man living 20 days before election
in this locality to vote the proposed
bill would soon do away with all the
progress already made.
The great commoner argued for pro-
hibition because of its moral and fi-
nancial issues, declaring that taxes
were increased by the maintaining of
state poor houses and insane asylums.
N. C. Fetter, Jr., chairman of the lo-
cal campaign, in opening the meeting,
asked all to vote against the home rule
bill.
GIVES HOMER 18 MONTHS
Alleged Blackmailer Sentenced to At-
lanta Prison
New York, Oct. 23.-On a plea of
guilty to a charge of impersonating a
United States officer, Homer French,
one of the defendents in the govern-
ment's crusade against alleged black-
mailers, was sentenced to 18 months
in the federal prison at Atlanta here
today by Judge Shepard in the United
States district court.
French was charged in an indict-
ment with being one of several men
who broke into a room at the Hotel
Ansonia last May, threatening Edward
R. West of Chicago, vice-president of
the Gregg Coffee and Tea company,
with prosecution under the Mann
white slave act with having brought
Miss Buda Godman of Chicago to New
York. F. Donahue, a co-defendent
with French, pleaded not guilty to the
same charges and was held in $10,000
ball by Judge Shepard.

BILLY SUNDAY GERI
8;000 TO 'SUPPI
CAMPAIGN INI
SUNDAYISMS
"I'll fight the liquor interests
until hell freezes over, and then
I'll buy a pair of skates and light
'em on the ice."
"The professing Christian who
votes against prohibition is a worse
sinner than the drunkard, the vic-
tim of the institution the supposed
decent man allows to exist."
"I would like to be in hell when
these good men who voted for the
saloon arrive, so that I could heat
up the fires for them."
"There'll be so many of these
foes of prohibition in hell, that their
feet will be sticking out of the
windows."
"The man who places money
above the lives of men, women,
and children is so low that he will
have to take an airship to get to
hell."

BRYAN REASONS FOR
D RY CAUSSUN DAY
Great Commoner Says Home Rule
Amendment Will Destroy Pres-
ent Progress

AU DIENCEEOF
IRT PROHIBITION
MICHIGANTHIS FALL
HEARERS RISE IN BODY AT END
OF SPEECH AND PLEDOE
HELP FOR CAUSE
CITES CASE OF DRY KANSAS
Brings Lecture to Dramatic Close;
Talks at Football Team's
Training Table
"Billy" Sunday, evangelist extraor-
dinary, shot home his points in his
sermon on "Booze" in Weinberg's
coliseum yesterday morning and the
8,000 people who heard him rose to
their feet in a body as he finished,
and showed their sentiment in favor
of the state-wide prohibition amend-
ment at stake this fall.
Sunday lived up to expectations, and
clearly outlined his reasons for be-
ing "the uncompromising foe of the
liquor traffic." His examples were
dramatic, his arguments backed up by
facts and figures, and his appeals were
full of the emotions, as he poured shot
after shot into the saloonkeepers, the
brewers, and the distillers.
The great revivalist condemned to
perdition all those who made their
livelihood off of the ltluor traffic,
pleaded with those who were in the
clutches of drink to rid themselves of
a habit which was not only ruining
themselves but also endangering pos-
terity, and criticised most of all those
professing Christianity who voted for
the saloon. "If all professing Chris-
tians in the country voted for prohibi-
tion, we would be able to drive out
this God-forsaken business," declared
Mr. Sunday.
In answer to the argument that con-
ditions were not improved by pro-
hibition, Sunday cited the case of dry
Kansas, where criminals and paupers
are fewer proportionately than they
are in wet states. He appealed to the
farmers to vote away the saloons, de-
claring that the price they received
from the brewers for corn and wheat
was "picked from their pockets,"
when they were forced to meet the
market prices for hogs, made low by
the cheaper variety the brewers put on
sale.
"The saloon element cries about the
large amount of revenue the country
will lose if it goes dry," said "Billy."
"The United States receives $300,000,-
000 every year from licenses. The la-
boring man pays ,$2,000,000,000 every
year for drink. The nation pays over
$1,500,000,000 for the maintenance on
institutions made necessary primarily
by the saloon. I could run this gov-
ernment every year and pay all bills
on the amount of money spent every
year for drink."
Sunday's conclusion was strikingly
dramatic. He brought a dozen young
boys upon the platform and declared
that these boys formed theĀ° raw ma-
terialtout of which the saloon made
its finished product of drunkards. "One
out of every five homes," shouted the
evangelist, "must furnish a boy to
keep the product up, if you keep the
saloon. Is it worth while?"
Choir Leader Rodeheaver accom-
panied Mr. Sunday to Ann Arbor, and
lead the audience in singing "Brighten'
the Corner Where You Are," and "De
Brewers' Big Horses," songs made
famous in the Sunday revivals. Mr.

Sunday, upon the invitation of Trainer
Harry Tuthill, spoke to the football
team at training table yesterday noon,
following his sermon.
PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI WILL
DINE BEFORE PENNSY GAME
The Michigan Alumni association, of
Philadelphia, will hold a dinner and
smoker, Nov. 17. This will occur on
the evening before the Michigan-Penn-
sylvania game.

i

of most of the students, to serve as a Lunatics in England Escaping
form of advance advertising for the London, Oct. 23.-The superintend-
campaign now under way. Monday ent of Hill End asylum at St. Albans
afternoon 20 large bainers were has notified the authorities that the
placed on as many automobiles in the war is responsible for an unusual
city to give further publicity to the escape of lunatics, the call to the col-
project. ors having depleted his staff.

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