100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 22, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
CONTINUED UNSETTLED
WITH VARIABLE WINDS

r
x i 39 x
1 C-FAN

..." r

. r .rrr... i
t
".-
1

-

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

'U

-.XX I. . .AN A B m ICHIGAN, SUNDAY, I CT BER1 9L / ICEE E T
VOL.' XXVII. No. 18. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENT

FRESHMEN TURN TABLES ON SOPHS,
TAKING fALL CONTESTS BY 4-1
SCURE; TWO SEVERELY INJURED

Pat Smith Halts t. A. C. Player

LINE PLAYS REAL FOOTBALL' IN
DOWNING AGGIES BY 9-0 COUNT;
MAULBETSCH AND SPARKS STAR

FLAG RUSH CONTINUES FOR 90
MINUTES, UNTIL TIME j
IS CALLED
1919 TAKES__CANE SPREE
Cudlip, '19, Suffers Broken Rib, and
MacMillan,'19, Breaks Col-
larB one
Freshmen beat the sophomore class
in the fall rush on Ferry field yester-
day morning, for the first time since
the event has been staged on that
ground. The sophomores were not
able to take a single one of the three
poles during the 30-minute battle, but
were able, however, to come back in
the sane spree, taking the contest by
a 19 to 10 score.

"I am not expecting this countr3
to get into war," he said. "I know
that the way in which we have pre-
served peace is objected to and that
certain gentlemen, say they would
have taken some other way that would
inevitably resulted in war, but I am
not expecting this country to get into
war, partly because I am not expect-
ing these gentlemen to have a chance
to make a mess .of it." The president
riddled Republbn tariff arguments,
urging national 'nity, and particularly
emphasizing the need for co-operation,
especially in view of the big problems
ahead after peace comes.
NOTATJMINISTER
SPEAKS TONIGHT

v'
t
i
t
3

FOOTBALL RESU TS,..
W'est
Northwestern, 10; Chicago, 0.
Minnesota, 81; South Dakota, 0.
Wisconsin, 13; Haskell, 0.
East
Cornell, 19; Bucknell, 0.
Princeton, 33; Lafayette, 0.
Pittsburg, 30; Syracuse, 0
Pennsylvania, 13; Penn State, 0.
AUSTRIAN PRIME
MINISTER KILLED1

B1ryan to Speak
This Afternoon

Seniors Elected
to Jiortar Jhoard

SPARKS' DROP KICK FOR FIRST
SCORE RESULTS FROM
HIGH PASS
22,000 SPECTATORS AT GAME
Niemann, Peach, Dunne and Rehor
Play Brilliantly
in Line
And lo! The Aggies fell!
Michigan's Varsity pushed the
Farmers right off the top of the proud
and elevated pedestal that they have
occupied for the past season and the
resounding thump as they struck the
cold, soggy ground was musics in the
ears of the majority of, the 22,000
spectators who defied the elements
and saw one of the most interesting
battles that has claimed a Ferry field
setting for many a moon.
Oh yes, the score was 9 to 0, but this
is merely an incidental and superflous
detail.
Michigan's victory is more or less
directly attributable to this newest of
football stars whose position in the
gridiron firmament was rather firmly
and convincingly established yester-

There were a number of injuries. The I Dr.

S. M.
Mass.,

most serious of these was sustained
by Merlin A. Cudlip, '19, who is suffer-
ing a broken rib. H. MacMillan, '19, has
a broken collar bone. Another par-
ticipant, 'whose name could not be
learned, had his lower lip cut through
and It was necessary to take three
stitches.
According to schedule, the sophs
gathered at 9:30 o'clock in front of
Tappan hall and preceded the fresh-
men who had gathered around the
flag pole, to Ferry field.
The older classmen upon arrival at
the field, first took a stand under the
protecting wing of the stadium where
they proceeded to hold a council of war.
The yearlings, however, marched di-
rectly to the field of battle and massed
themselves around the three poles.
After lengthy pow-wowing the sopho-
mores, although rather few in num-
bers, but abundant in noise and pep,
filed to the south end of the field and
lined up facing the west pole.
At 10:15 the gun was fired announc-
ing the time for assault. Thinking to
produce a battle array which would
rival the ancient phalanx, the sopho-
mores used a method yet rather young
in modern warfare. They proceded
in one column until they reached the
first pole. Here the column parted,
half going .on each side of the pole.
They just touched the men amassed
around the west pole and then went
on the center pole. And there they
stayed. They stayed the entire allotted
time, failing to capture the pole be-
cause of their inability to climb. Three
times a member of the older class
broke away and managed to get dut
of reach of the youngsters, only to find
that the pole was too slippery to climb.
Directly following the defeat of the
sophomores at the pole game, the
freshmen were given a drubbing in the
cane spree. bf the thirty pairs en;
tered in this contest, only one pair
was unable to come to a decision.
These two men, Porter, '19, and Cad-
well, '20, twisted and squirmed for
the entire 15 minutes, neither being
able to wrest the cane from the other's
grasp. Following are the men win-
ning: Sophomores-Smith, Thompson,
White, Hobbs, Smith, Shields, Woods,
Watkins, Carey, Goetz, Akers, Mack,
Smith, Baden, McClintock, Walking,
Hodges, Biggers, Aleen. Freshmen-
Belknapp, Tubbs, Mustard, Appleby,
O'Hara, Lardrig, Cook, Nyman, Mans-
field, Stoll.
As yet the flags have not been
awarded. This matter will be taken
up by the student council at its next
meeting.
WILSON ADDRESSES FARMERS
Replies to "Certain Gentlemen" Dur-
ing Shadow Lawn Speech
(By Robert J. Bender, United Press
Staff Correspondent.)
Shadow Lawn, N. J., Oct. 21.-PresI-
dent Wilson told farmers and en-
gineers gathered here this afternoon
he believed America will stay at peace.
This will be partly due to the fact
that "certain gentlemen" will not be
In power to do differently than he has

Crothers, of Cambridge,
to Deliver Address at
Union Services

FEDERATED CHURCHES TO CLOSE
Dr. Samuel McChord Crothers, min-
ister of the First Unitarian church of
Cambridge, Mass.,and better known
for his brilliant essays which for many
years have appeared in The Atlantic
Monthly, will address a union meet-
ing 7:30 o'clock tonight in Hill

Address at Weinberg's Coliseum Chief
ly for Students; To Make
Plea for Prohibition
This afternoon at 3 o'clock William
Jennings Bryan will speak at the
Weinberg coliseum. Mr. Bryan wil
confine his talk entirely to a plea
for prohibition. He will make an at-
tempt to direct his message as far as
possible to the students of the Uniyer
sity.
Anticipating a large gathering at the
meeting, the committee in charge
made special preparations for handl-
ing the people. At his last appearanc
in Ann Arbor, when he spoke against
preparedness, a record crowd greeted
Mr. Bryan.
:RESUME GREAT LAKES TRIPS
Abatement of Storm Shows Loss of
Seven Lives and Seven Ships
Detroit, Oct. 21.-After 24 hours in
shelter while a 50-mile gale lashed the
lower Great Lakes to fury, lake ship-
ping was resumed tonight. The storm
has abated, but it took a toll of seven
lives and sent seven ships to the bot-
tom of Lake Erie. With the arrival
of the steamer Hartwell at Fairport,
O., this afternoon bearing 10 survivors
from the wreck of the steamer Mar-
shall F. Butters, the toll from last
night's storm was definitely fixed at
seven. Of these sIX perished when the
barge Filer floundered off Bar Point,
Lake Erie, after a futile 12-hour bat-
tle against heavy seas.
The seventh was from the crew of
the Butters when that lumber carrier
went down in Southeast shoal in Lake
Erie. Captain John Mattison of Muske-
gon was the sole survivor of the crew
of seven aboard the barge Filer. He
was rescued from the rigging of his
sinking ship by members of the crew
of the passenger liner Western States,
who reached him in a life boat after
a thrilling two-hour battle with the
waves. One by one the others of the
Filer's crew had dropped to their
death from the boat's rigging be-
numbed by the all night wait for res-
cue in the bitter cold.
Students Demand Better Teachers
Cleveland, Oct. 21.-Even the stu-
dents are doing it. Dental scholars at
Western Reserve university are ask-
ing for better instructors.

- Women's Honor Society Chooses Ne
Members and Announces Of-
feers for Year
e Mortar Board, senior women's honor
1 society, has elected the following new
a members from the senior class: Mar-
s garet R. Reynolds, Olive Hartsig, Della
- C. Laubengayer, Janet McFarlane,
Julia Renwick, Elsa Paul, Alice Wieb-
e er, Helen Davis, Adele Perkins; Eliza-
e beth, Arthur, Eva Sharrow.
- Officers of the society are: President,
t Olga Shinkman; secretary, Genevieve
i Rowe; treasurer, Jeannette Arm-
strong; custodian, Frances Way.
HITS HUGHES' MANAGERS
Mangum Likens National Campaign to
City Man on Farm
Detroit, Oct. 21.-"The Republican
national campaign is being run as a
city-bred man would run a farm," Re-
publican State Chairman John B. Man-
gum declared tonight in an interview,
in which he bitterly criticized the
"men down east" in charge of the
Hughes campaign.
He charged that the campaign man-
agers were utterly unfitted for their
task of electing the Republican candi-
date. Mangum asserted Hughes would
carry Michigan and perhaps get a ma-
jority in Detroit, despite the lack of
co-operation from the national com-
mittee.
TRAVEL TALK ON SOUTHWESI
John P. Clum will Show Pictures of
Roosevelt's Dam in Arizona
Mr. John P. Clum, who is to appear
in Hill auditorium at 8 o'clock Tues-
day evening with a motion picture
travel-talk, will bring with him a new
series of "movies" containing pictures
of the Roosevelt dam of Arizona, the
military activities on the Mexican bor-
der, and various scenes in Hawaii.
I Mr. Clum was personally solicited
by President Harry B. Hutchins and
his appearance here will be under the
auspices of the Oratorical association.
An admission fee of 25 cents will be
charged.

Count Stuergkh Shot by Vienna Editor
While at Dinner; Communi-
cations Held Up
DEATH F 0 L L 0 W S INSTANTLY
BULLETIN
Amsterdam, Oct. 21.-Emperor
Franz Josef immediately sum-
moned the cabinet into special
session on learning of the assasin.
ation of Count Stuergkh, said a
Vienna dispatch tonight. The em.
peror was deeply shocked by the
news. The motive for the crime
Is not known.
Berlin, by Wireless to Sayville, Oct.
21.-Count Stuergkh, the Austrian
prime minister, was shot and killed
at dinner today by a man named Adler,
editor of a Vienna periodical.
Count Carl Stuergkh became prime
minister of Austria on November 3,
1911. The ministry was reorganized'
in November, 1915. The cabinet, of
which he was the head, dealt solely
with the affairs of Austria, and not
with the government of the dual mon-
archy of Austria-Hungary.
(By Carl W. Aackerman, United Press
Staff Correspondent.)
Berlin, Oct. 21.-Telephone com-
munication between Berlin and Vienna
was interrupted tonight immediately
after news of the assasination of
Count Stuergkh, Austrian prime min-
ister. Fragmentary dispatches regard-
ing the shooting caused the greatest
speculation here.
News of the assasination reached
Berlin shortly after 6 o'clock. One
dispatch said that Count Stuergkh was
lunching at the Hotel Reissl when he
was attacked. Frederick Adler walked
into the dining room and without a
word fired threeshots, taking careful
aim at the count's head. The premier
fell over in his chair. Friends rushed
to his side and found that he had
died instantly.
Athens, Oct. 21.-Italian troops com-
pleting the occupation of southern Al-
bania have occupied 39 villages in the
region of Deluine, it was officially an-
nounced tonight.

r
r

DR. S. M. CROTHERS.
auditorium, under the auspices of
the Ann Arbor Federation of churches.
Dr. Crothers is a graduate of Prince-
ton, carrying the degrees of D. D.,
from Harvard, and Litt. D. from St.
Lawrence and Princeton. The'early
part of his ministry was spent in the
Presbyterian church. In 1882 he
united with the Unitarian denomina-
tion, and since 1894 has been minis-
ter of the First Church of Cambridge.
He has been university preacher at
Harvard, where his addresses have had
no small part in giving him the wide
(Continued on Page, Six.)

day afternoon-Mr. Sparks, if y'ou
please-and if he maintains the pace
that he set yesterday, ere long his
name will be writ in capital letters
and they'll start naming babies and
pullman cars and cigars and delicious
fifteen cent sundaes after him. And
well they may.
Cliff doesn't play solely with his
physical makeup either, although he
could, and get away like a breeze with
this as his sole and only asset. For
quick thinking that drop kick of his
takes the prize. Those fighting Aggies
had held and Sparks called for a place
kick. He knelt down to hold the ball
for Maulie but the pass was high and
he had to leap into the air to catch it.
There was no time to stoop over to ad-
just it for the Dutchman, so he whaled
away himself, with a drop kick. He
was on the 35-yard line at the time
but the ball sailed squarely between
the posts, and the first man to shake
his Xand was the astonished and de-
lighted Maulie.
Captain Maulbetsch was a marked
man all afternoon. The Aggies were
laying for him on every play and the
Ducthman didn't shine as much on of-
fense as is his usual style. On de-
fense he was a bear, however, and his
blocking was the best that he's ever
done.
Wallie Niemann and Peach were
vertiable whirlwinds, while Bull Dunne
and Fritz Rehor seemed to suspect
that there was something else going
on besides a pink tea. The only rea-
son Peach and Dunne weren't catcu-
ing Sparks' punts themselves was be-
cause the law expressly forbids such
action. They were down under every
kick and poor Huebel and Butler were
thrown towards their own goal with
such violence c n every punt that to-
wards the end of the game they were
selecting soft spots on which to land
before receiving the ball.
Wallie Niemann was perhaps the in-
dividual star of the game on defense.
Wallie was into everything and on one
occasion when an M. A. C.man actual-
ly blocked him and put him out of the
play Maulbetsch called time out, fear-
ing that his center must be injured
and about to die.
Those Aggies weren't crushed or
overwhelmed or massacred either.
They went down fighting and fighting
hard. Jacks and Blacklock headed the
attack and defense. Blacklock was a
tower of strength on defense, and he
(Continued on Page Three.)
A. A. Meyer to Speak Before A. L E. E.
Mr. A. A. Meyer, assistant electrical
engineer for the Detroit Edison com-
pany, will give a lecture before 'the
student branch of the A. I. E. E. Wed-
nesday evening, Oct. 25, 7:30 o'clock.
The subject is, "A Description of the
Detroit Edison Transmission and Dis-
tribution Systems in Detroit." Previous
to this lecture there will be a'meet-
ing of the members of the A. I. E. E.
and it is important that each member

Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.
10:30 A. M. Sermon by Leonard A. Barrett
Theme-THE HIDDEN GOD
Noon - Prof. W. D. Henderson speaks to young men .
Prof. Thos. E. Rankin speaks to young women

=- - ----= -== === =====-======== === ==== =i-=--iii- ==
First Methodist Church1
Arthur W. Stalker, Pastor
lu man
mum
ME Services 10:30 A. M-
unday School - - - 12:00 Noon
Epworth League- 6:30 P.M. I
1. _ _ _ -U _

-s - -

SAMUEL McCHORD CROTHERS
Hill Auditorium, 7:30 Tonight Under auspices of Ann Arbor Federation of Churches

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan