100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 21, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L. A
....ft+'

I ~

....."" "o"
w«/'"
.++ r

ANN ARBOR-
NCREASING COLD AND CLOUDY;
MODERATE WINDS

.1

1CHIGAN

rAIi

UNITED PRESS WIRI
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER [
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVIL No. 17. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1916. PRICE FIVE CEN'

AUDIENCE 'CROWDS
HILL AUDITORIUM
AT MASS M EETIN G
ENTHUSIASM GREETS SPEAKERS;
MURPHY UNABLE TO BE
PRESENT
PONTIUS ADDRESSES VARSITY
Aley, Aigler, Strasburg, and John Pre.-
diet Victory for Michigan in
Today's Game
With every available seat of the
5,500 in Hill auditorium filled, the
mass meeting of last night was pro-
nounced to be one of the largest and
snappiest ever held at Michigan.
Long before speakers or hand made
their appearance upon the. .tage, the
audience insisted upon the expression
of their enthusiasm by prlonged
cheering, the male r embers of the
audience shedding their coats in the
effort to cool the ardor of the ino-
ment.
"Eddie" Carroll, chairman of the
meeting, announced that due to an ill-
ness, Frank Murphy had beurn unable
to fill his engagement on the program,
but that W. A. P. John, '10, had c:,n-
sented to take his plat e. Chc Jrs
greeted the announcement.
John indulged in some remarks per-
tinent to the M. A. C. aggregation, and
give reasons for his belief that Michi-
gan would hold the big end of the
score in today's game.
He was followed by Robert Aley,
president of the Univeraity of Maine,
who spoke of the work of "Tommy"
Hughitt as coach cf Maine's varsity,
and asserted that he had seen enough
cf Michigan's Fightin spirit from her
single exponent to feel confidentr of
her victory on the field of battle.
Prof. R. W. Aigler, of the law/ac-
ulty, outlined the plans of the ath-
letic association for the coming year,
explaining that provision had been
made to take care of everyone desir-
ing to enter any form of organized
athletics. He stated that due to this
more men might be induced to turn
out for the various sports, and win-
ning teams might come to be the gen-
eral rule.
"Jim" Strasburg, '02, organizer of the
come-back mass meeting of last year,
as"ured the team of the hearty sup-
port of students and alumni. "Above
all," he advised, "be natural. Do
yourselves justice." Despite the fact,
he urged, that only one man of the
present Varsity started against M. A.
C. last year, the men have already
shown by their performances that they
are one of the best teams turned out
by Michigan within the last five years.
Calls for "Yost!" were met by the
announcement that the coach was un-
able to be present, but "Brute" Pon-
tins finally answered to an insistant
and repeated call, speaking of the per-
formances of the Green and White, and
praising the "pep" the Varsity had
shown. "Fight till the last whistle
blows," he told the members of the
team.
The talks were interspersed with
yells led by "Hal" Smith, last year's
Varsity track captain and cheer leader,
and "Bob" Bennett, while the Varsity
band led the songs, the words of which
were flashed upon the screen, as were
also the pictures of Yost, Maulbetsch,
and the team. The mass meeting closed
with the singing of "The Yellow and

Blue."

Benson Campaign
Thru' Arizona on
Socialist Candidate Says Embargo on
Food Stuffs Must Be
D~eclared
Yuma, Ariz., Oct. 20.-Allen L. Ben-
son, Socialist presidential candidate,
carrIed his campaign into Arizona to-
day after a vigorous tour of speech
making In California. The Socialist
leader declared that unless federal ac-
tion is taken and an embargo on food
exports is clamped down a famine will
be the result. "A halt must be called,"
he said, "or a great disaster will
speedily overtake this country."
Winnipeg, Canada, Oct. 20.-Can-
adian Pacific trainmen from coast to
coast were this afternoon ordered to
strike at 5 o'clock Wednesday. This
is a sudden turn from optimistic re-
turns earlier this week. Grant Hall,
vice president of the Canadian Pacific,
says he has not yet despaired of an
amicable settlement before the order
takes effect.
Lansing. Oct. 20.-Final plans for
the big drive of the last two weeks of
the prohibition amendment campaign
were made at a conference of dry
leaders from 60 counties here .today.
Addressing the conference, Grant M.
Hudson, superintendent of the anti-
saloon league in Michigan, predicted
success of the dry corps by 50,000 ma-
jority.
Cincinnati, Oct. 20.-Lee Heine, bet-
ting commissioner, announced today
he had $5,000 to bet on Wilson at even
money. He placed three bets Thurs-
day, $1,800 to $1,500, $1,200 to $1,000,
and $2,400 to $2,000, Hughes being the
favorite in each case.
Indianapolis, Oct. 20.-The Fari-
-erk'National congress today*voted to
hold its next convention at Houston,
Texas.
85 Years Old; To
Wed Woman 50
And the Octogenarian's Wife-to-Be Is
the Niece of His First
}Helpmeet
(By United Press.)
New York, Oct. 20.-Sometime be-
tween this day and September 21, 1917,
Alonzo R. Peck, 85 years old and
wealthy, intends to make Miss Fannie
Ferrie Gahagan, 50, and a neice of
his first wife, his blushing bride. An-
nouncement of the wedding-to-be was
made one month ago. The time was
fixed as more than a month and less
than a year from date of announce-
ment. The wedding announcement was
a "bolt from the blue" to friends.
Peck's wife died four years ago. A
short time afterward Miss Gahagan's
mother died. She then took up her
residence in the home of Peck. Miss
Gahagan called him "Uncle Lon" in
common with hundreds of his ac-
quaintances. Each Sunday the pair
attended services at the Brick Presby-
terian church where they were known
as "the two bricks of the amen cor-
ner." During the lifetime of the late
Mrs. Peck, with her husband she was
a regular attendant and always, with
him, and usually with Miss Gahagan,
occupied the selfsame "amen corner."
Peck has served on the grand jury
45 consecutive years. President Lin-
coln offered him an Italian consulate

but he refused.

WILSON ATTACKD,
BUT UNINJUREDI N
PITTSBURG STREET
YOUNG MECHANIC LEAPS TWICE
AT AUTOMOBILE OF
PRESIDENT
THINK MENTALLY DERANGED
Bryan Joins Party Upon Arrival;
Rides Through Parks; Talks
on Campaign
(Robert J. Bender, United Press Staff
Correspondent.)
Pittsburg, Oct. 20.-President Wood-
row Wilson was attacked while driv-
ing through the heart of the city here
today by Richard Cullen, 22 years old,
who is believed to be mentally de-
ranged. No injury was done.
Cullen, who is a mechanic, twice at-
tempted to climb over into the car
in which the president, Mrs. Wilson,
Democratic State Chairman Joseph
Duffy, and two secret service men
were riding.
Cullen leaped on the running board
and tried to 'clamber into the automo-
bile. He was grabbed by the secret
service men and pushed into the
street. Jumping up, he again caught
the automobile and duplicated his ef-
fects. He was forced back again, and
pummeled when he made an effort to
rise.
Crowd Gathers About Car.
The crowd closed about the car and
it was several minutes before the 50
police who gathered from all direc-
tions were able to drive it back. Cul-
len was bleeding at the mouth and
nose. He broke away from his cap-
tor by swinging the satchel around
with ,his free hand and rbirnging it
down on the detective's wrist, but the
police intercepted and captured him
again. His physician says he is men-
tally deranged.
He was later taken to the police sta-
tion and a black satchel was searched
which he had been carrying while at-
tempting the assault. A long knife
and several chisels were found. By-
standers noticed a revolver fall to the
ground where the attempted attack
occurred, but it is not known whether
the gun belonged to Cullen or the po-
lice.
Wilson pulled into Pittsburg before
starting out on the last lap of his trip
back to Shadow Lawn, and he was
accorded a great reception from the
residents of the Smoky City. He was
met at the train by a tremendous
crowd and his route uptown was
marked by continuous demonstrations.
Bryan and President Ride Together.
William Jennings Bryan met the
president and shook hands with him
for the first time in months. Bryan
rode with the president on his auto
trip through the parks. The meeting
of the president and his former secre-
tary of state was an unexpected one,
as Bryan was enroute to Johnstown,
but missed connections. Pennsylvania
is the thirteenth state Byran has
spoken in during the campaign. Be-
fore election day he will have talked
in half as many more.
"No," he said, "it is not like '96.
There probably never was one like
that, but there is a tremendous amount
of enthusiasm. The trend is for Wil-
son. Not only that, but is is increas-
(Continued on Page Six.)

In tercias

s__Contest

Rules

POINTS
Central pole................2
East pole ..................1
West pole..................1
Cane spree.................1

points.
point.
point.
point.

FLAG RUSH RULES
All contestants must wear tennis shoes.
Freshmen will wear green paint on foreheads.
There shall be no greasing of poles or throwing of powder and the
like.
Freshmen meet in front of flag pole 9:30 o'clock.
Sophomores meet in front of Tappan hall at 9:30 o'clock.
Sophomores march to"Ferry field first, remaining under stadium un-
til time for contest to start.
Freshmen follow and surround the three poles at south end of
Ferry field.
At 9:45 o'clock sophomores come from under the stadium and form
at southwest end of Ferry field.
Contest will last thirty minutes, or till any time before then when
all three flags shall have been removed from the poles by the sopho-
mores.
One shot of gun means start or resume contest.
Three shots of gun means stop contest.
Hands in air is signal for man down.
When man is down contest will stop immediately until one shot for
resuming.
CANE SPREE RULES
Thirty men shall be picked from each class.
One freshman and one sophomore shall contest for each of 30 canes.

The class having the greatest
minutes shall win the event.

number of canes at the end of 15

Set Goal of 2,000 Memberships This
Year; Lewis, '19, Is General
Chairman
PROMINENT SPEAKERS TO COME
Not less than 2,000 memberships is
the goal set for the end of the annual
fall membership campaign of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A., which will start
Monday morning. Two hundred so-
licitors, under 20 captains, will make
a complete canvass of the student
population and their work will con-
tinue until the goal is reached.
H. R. Lewis, '19, general chairman
of the membership committee, has
charge of the campaign. S. L. ken-.
nedy, '18; C. E. Hutton,''17-'19L, and
W. T. Adams, '17, will have charge of
the general canvass, and H. E. Cov-
ert, '19, will act as chairman of com-
mittee on fraternity memberships.
These men have had wide experience
in Y. M. C. A. work.
Prospects of the greatest year in the
history of the local association lend an
added impetus to this year's campaign.
The new building, the finest of its kind
in the country, will be opened before
the end of the present semester. Stu-
dent members of the association will
at last know a home where all en-
tertainments, provided for their bene-
fit, may be held without conflicting
with other activities.
W. J. Bryan, Col. G. W. Bain of the
Colt Lyceum circuit, President Albert
Parker Fitch of Andover academy, and
John Spargo, one of the leading so-
cialist thinkers of the country, form a
part of the list of men from which
speakers will be chosen for associa-
tion meetings during the winter. All
of these men have spoken here before,
and have signifipd their willingness to
return.
Former Michigan Man to Referee
Detroit, Oct. 20.-William Heston,
former Michigan star, will referee the
Harvard-Cleveland Erin Braus game
on the Solvay field Sunday afternoon.

SERBS ADVANCE IN
MONASTIR ATTACK
Berlin Rejorts Recapture or Trenches
and Destruction of Three
'Tanks'; Check Russ
ROUMANIANS W I N I N DRIVE
Paris, Oct. 20.-Serbian troops have
scored a brilliant success in their new
advance on the Bulgarian base at Mon-
astir. Following the capture of the
village of Brod the Serbians advanced
on the left bank of the River Cerna,
carrying the plateau and village of
Volessololo and inflicting heavy losses
on the enemy. The Bulgarians fled in
disorder leaving three guns, several
machine guns and 100 prisoners in Ser-
bian hands.
Berlin, via wireless to Sayville, Oct.
20.-The largest part of the trenches
captured by the British on the road
from Eaucourt l'Abbaye to Lebarque
Wednesday, were recaptured by the
Germans yesterday.
"During the last great attack it is
reported the British used some of
their much heralded armored automo-
biles," adds the official statement.
"Three of the so-called 'tanks' are ly-
ing before our lines destroyed by sour
artillery fire. There was a mutual ar-
tillery duel on both sides of tIte Somme
during the rainy weather yesterday.
"The advance of English detatch-
ments east of Le Sars failed. On the
front of Prince Leopold of Bavaria,
several Russian counter attacks be-
fore the position we gained north of
Sviniavka on the Stochod broke down
with heavy losses. The Serbs' at-
tack in the Macedonian bend which
was temporarily successful, has been
halted."
London,. Oct. .20. - The . Germans
heavily bombarded the Stuff and
Schwaben redoubts north of Thiepval
last night, General Haig reported this
afternoon. British troops carried out
two small raids on enemy trenches
near Loos.
Bucharest, Oct. 20.-The Roumanian
counter offensive has won further vic-
tories against the Teutons, it was of-
ficially announced this afternoon. In
the Oituz Valley the enemy have been
driven back to the frontier. Monteuru
has been captured by the Roumanians.

PLNS COMPLETE
FOR AAL FRESH
SOPH FLG RUSH,1
CONTESTANTS ARE URGED TO
HEED RULES SET BY
COUNCIL
CLASH STARTS AT 10 SHARP
Sophomores Assemble at Tappan Hall
While Freshmen Collect Around
Flag Pole
Preparations are complete for the
biggest and safest fresh-soph rush in
the history of Michigan inter-class
contests which will be staged this
morning on south Ferry field.
The clash will begin promptly at
the sound of the referee's whistle and
this will be as near to 10 o'clock as
it will be possible to make it. The
yearlings are scheduled to foregather
at the flag pole in front of the library
at 9:30 o'clock while the more doughty
second year men will collect in front
of Tappan hall at the same hour.
As soon as possible after 9:30 o'clock
the two groups will march separately
to Ferry field and the battle will be-
gin., The freshmen will be known by
the green "war paint" which each one
will be required to wear upon his fore-
head.
Members of the student council
worked hard and long this afternoon
at the arduous job of erecting three
poles, and everything is waiting the
crucial moment. All efforts within
reason have been made to prevent in-
jury to the participtants. The men
are urged to, read the rules carefully
which govern the contest and which
appear in another column of this
page. If students will observe them
conscientiously serious accidents will
be avoided.
Captains and assistants have been
elected by each class. James McClin-
tock was chosen to lead the sopho-
mores. His assistants will be Donald
H. Shields, William R. Cruse, Oscar H.
Cartwright, and August G. Goetz. The
freshmen will be led by Robert C.
Stewart and the assistants will be Rus-
sell Mustard, Robert Cook, J. L. Baker,
and J. L. Belnap.
TWO CLASSES ELECT OFFICERS.
Junior Lits and Fresh Engineers Pick
Leaders for Year
Two classes elected officers yester-
day for the ensuing year. The re-
suits of the elections were as follows:
Junior lits-President, Owen Watts;
vice president, Frieda McLellan; sec-
retary, Grace Raynesford; treasurer,
George Daniels; football manager,
William Brown; track manager, Wil-
liam Darnall; basketball manager,
Raymond Brown; baseball manager,
Karl Wehmeyer; oratorical delegate,
James Schermerhorn, Jr.
Fresh engineers-President, S. T.
Lowe; vice president, M. E. Lane; sec-
retary, .H. J. L. Cotton; treasurer, C.
K. Briggs; football manager, Jack
West (elected unanimously); baseball
manager, H. N. Anderson; basketball
manager, H. E. Edison; track man-
ager, S. W. Morehouse.
Chess Club Holds Meeting Tonight

Chess fans will have an opportunity
to see how a tournament is conducted
if they attend the regular meeting of
the -Michigan Chess club to be held
tonight in room 173 natural science
building.
Every student who is interested in
the game is urged to come out and
sign up for membership. Business
matters in connection with organiza-
tion will be discussed.

Bar Lafayette Students at Contest
"M" Club of Detroit Secures Sunday Easton, Pa., Oct. 20.-Lafayette col-
"Bily" Sunday has been secured by lege football eleven will play at
the University of Michigan club of Princeton Saturday, but no Lafayette
Detroit to give an address for the bene- students will be permitted to accom-
fit of Michigan men in the Board of pany the team, according to a ruling
Commerce auditorium in that city on made by the factulty. This action
October 25. The address will be given was taken because of the death Sun-
at 12:15 o'clock and a luncheon will day of a student at Princeton from in-
be served immediately after the talk, fantile paralysis.

NORMAL COLLEGE CONCERT COURSE
FREDERICK ALEXANDER, Director
PEASE AUDITORIUM - - - YPSILAI
A NNOUNCES FOR THE SEASON 1916-17.
i. Percy Grainger, Pianist, Nov. 14. 4. Kneisel Quartet, Jau. 18.
2. Philadelphia Symphony Orches- 5. Old Ecclesiastical Chord Music by
tra. Nov. 25. Ninety-four players. The College Choir. March 1$.
3. Christmas Music by The College
Choir. Dec. 7. 200 Singers under 6. Artist to be announced.
the direction of Frederick Alexander.
Reserved season seats $2.50 for six concerts. On sale Tuesday, Oct.
24, at four p. m. Pease Auditorium, Box Office. Mail orders filled in the
order of receipt. Checks should be drawn to Frederick Alexander, Direct-
or. Single Concerts, ,$r..5o and $2.00.

I, 1 . 1

K

M. A. C. -

MICHIGAN

E

Pi

P1

FOOTBALL

EXTRA,

5 Cents

On Sale By Newsboys Immediately After The Game

5 Cents

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan