100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 08, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-06-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
RAIN AN) COOLER
TODAY

INIRRUFF ar, ttu

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 180.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGA.N, FRIDAY, JUNE 8., 1917.

PRICE FIVE CENT

Y __ _

I t 1

-iADO FRESHMEN
SHED CRAY CAPS
AT CELEBRATiON
CAP NIGHT TO MARK PASSING OF
MEMBERS OF 1920 CLASS
INTO SOPIIOMOREDOM
COLLECT TOQUES AND
POTS FOR BELGIANS
Rand, Free Shliows, and Snake Dance
Combhie to Bring Joy Into
Eearts of Yearlings
Tonight is Cap night. In the light
of the big bonfire in Observatory hol-
low, celebrating Michigan's mostnoted
tradition, over a thousand freshmen
will be received into the coveted ranks
of Sophomoredom. Not only the fresh-
men, but the members of all the
classes will part with their official
head gear, thus introducing a new fea-
ture into the evening's program.
The University band, all the classes,
and hundreds of visitors will be out
to witness the events. The march
from the campus, the formation of the
traditional "M," speeches, songs, and
the big snake dance, will all be a part
of the evening.
Collect All Toques
Special arrangements have been
made to collect the toque of every man
on the campus and also the fresh pots
and send them to far away Belgium.
There will be two boxes at the en-
trance to Observatory hollow for all,
including the freshmen, to drop their
toques in as they march by. Every
man is especially urged to bring his
toque and do his part toward helping
by dropping it Jnto one of the boxes
as he goes by.
No Meal for Flames
Although everything will be as real-
istic as possible and appearances in-
dicate that the little grey pots ar' be-
ing turned into ashes, the hungry
flames will not receive their ac-
customed contribution tonight. A box
will be placedl near the big blaze, and
as the freshmen pass by at the end of
their traditional snake dance they will
throw their caps into it. All fresh-
men are urged not to mutilate their
caps in any way or they will 'be use-
less to save.
Meet at 7:15 O'clock
All classes will meet on the diagonal
walk at 7:15 o'clock this evening. The
band will assemble between the Law
and Natural Science buildings and
next to them the seniors, juniors,
sophomores, and freshmen in the or-
der named, forming a column of four
abreast extending back toward the en-
gineering arch. The seniors are asked
to wear their caps and gowns. After
the column reaches the field and forms
the block "M," the band will stop in
front of the bonfire and next to it in
a semicircle formation will be the
freshmen, then the sophomores,
Juniors,* seniors, and visitors further
up the hill.
Don Smith Master of Ceremonies
Don Smith, '17E, will be master of
ceremonies and will take charge as
soon as all are assembled at the hol-
low. The speakers in the order in
which they will appear are Grant
Cook, '17L; I. M. Carson, '17; "Vic"
Pattengill, '11, from Lansing, and Prof.
J. R. Brumm of the rhetoric depart-
ment. There will also be songs and
several band selections.
Give Free Shows

After the ceremonies are completed
the former freshmen will again form
in a column and followed by the soph-
omores will be escorted by the band
to the Orpheum and Weurth theaters
where free shows will be given. The
band and freshmen will go into the
Orpheum and the sophomores into the
Weurth. The films will be inter-
changed between the houses giving a
full show in each.

TAX CHECKS AND
DRAFTS OVER $5
1,ae Fijnnce C'ommiiteec Expoets
Move Will Bring in $0,-
Washington. June 7.- The senate
finance committee today put a two per
cent tax on all checks and drafts
over $5.00. It is expected that $10,-
000,000 in revenue will be raised un-
der the new action. Checks and drafts
under $5.00 will be exempt.
The committee decided to strike out
the 10 per cent tax on dues for social,
sporting, and athletic clubs, thereby
dropping $10,000,000 in revenue from
the bill. Some substitute for the tax
may be developed later.
80 STUDENTS SIGN FOR
SUMMER AT CAMP DAIS
PLAN TO P R 0 V I D E MILITARY
TRAINING FOR MEN UNDER
CANADIAN OFFICER
About 80 students of the forestry,
civil engineering, and landscape de-
signing departments have signed up
or the forty-fourth session of Camp
Davis, and will leave Ann Arbor June
29, arriving in camp on the following
Day. Equipment will be shipped Sat-
urday to the camp, located above 13
miles west of Cheboygan, Mich., and
on July 2 the session will open, last-
ing until August 24.
Plans are being made whereby the
men may obtain military training
while in camp, and it is hoped that a
Canadian training officer can be se-
cured in view of the shortage pf
American officers available for this
work. Ten new steel buildings will
he bii't this season, besides an Instru-
tnent Oilding and a refrigerator.
A .meating of the men was held yes-
terday afternoon to make final ar-
ranments and to receive final in-
stru'ios fUom Prof. C. T. Johnston.
Members of the faculty and assistants
who kill conp:ny tLe men are:
Pro'. C. T. John.ton, director; As-
sistant Prch'. H. B. Merrick, H. G.
Rascbbacher, and H. Brodie; teaching
assirtant, G. M. Bleekman, W. Bintz,
and R. A. Dodge; camp physicians, Dr.
C. B. Stouffer, John Bonin, in charge
of instruments; chicf cook, Henry
Hicis, and seven other assistants.
ITALY DENIeDS LOSSES
Austa EsmatsTenred ats Rden-
1y Offi"!als
Rome, June 7.-Austrian claims that
Italian loss, tetaling 180,000 during
the i ttn part of May wa character-
ized a s fntasic and rhicalaus in of-
fic'_^ circles today.
It was stated that most of the Itai-
ian ce n1alties were of slightly wound-
ed men, many of whom have already
returned to the battle front. Italian
military authorities have proof that
Austrian losses are more than double
those suffered by General Cadorna's
troops.
"Violent attack of our troops from
hill No. 247, east of Jaiamao, lasted
today," the official statement said,
"with varying fortune. In the even-
ing the enemy was completely re-
pulsed. Another attempt' to attack
from Slonder toward Satlici was
promptly stopped before fire was fully
developed."

If Your Exams Conflict-Change
Changes in the time of examination
for those classes which had conflicts
with other examinations were allowed
by the committee appointed at the re-
quest of the faculty by Dean John R.
Effinger. No changes were allowed for
those classes which had no conflicts
but which applied for permission to
change because of greater convenience.

BRITISH ADANCE
SWEEPS FORWARD
'alske Numerous Important Toii ns and
Capture Troops Totaling to
For Figures
RIDGE HELD BY GERMANS
SINCE OCT. 1914, RETAKEN
German Fighting Furious; Late Re-
ports Say Advance Still Pro.
gressing
By. Wnm. Phillip Simms
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
With the British Armies in the Field,
June 7.- The town of Messines andl a
score of other important points were
in British hands this afternoon, th
first fruits of a tremendous blow
struck by General Haig. Prisoners
reached a total running to fourf iig-
ures.
Such important points as Battle-
wood, Leuferwood, Neary Farm, Peas-
antwood. and villages of Hostice and
Zareebe have been carried, and this
afternoon are firmly held by the Brit-
ish. The Britsh assault began at 3:10
this morning 'with a wave forward
over the 10 mile front from Ypres to
Armentieres.
At the moment of cabling everything
appeared to be going well with the ad-
vance. The Messines ridge, dominat-
ing the whole north end of the line,
has been taken from the Germans who
had held it since October, 19a. The
German fighting is furious. Prisoners
now pouring in include many men
from different divisions, including
Prussians, Saxons, Bavarians Wur-
temburgers, and Silesians.
Artillery Fire Follows Explosions
Many tanks were used in fighting
by the British. The British advance
was heralded by a titanic convulsion
of earth as more than 600 tons of ex-
plosives buried in mines was set off
with three simultaneous explosions.
At the same time a terrific fire of ar-
tillery started. ,Late this afternoon
headquarters reported that "Un-godly
Trench" and Schnitzel Farm were in
British hands, and the troops still ad-
vancmg.
EXPECT AMBULANCE
'ENLISTMENTS SOON
Intelligence Bureau Director Goes to
Chicago to Secure
Officer
Francis Bacon, '02, state director of
the intelligence bureau, who has
charge of the formation of the Uni-
versity ambulance units, is expected
to return from Chicago today where
he has been endeavoring to make ar-
rangements for enlisting the men who
have joined the units. The enlistment
officer has been expected here daily
for some time but has not yet put in
an appearance. It is greatly desired
to get the men enlisted before any
of them leave school.
All men who have joined one of the
three units and whose names have{
been announced on the revised mem-
bership lists will keep themselves in
readiness for enlisting at any time and<
are requested to watch the bulletin
board closely for further announce-i
ments.:
The final formation of the first threei
units is practically completed at the
present time, applications to joinP
the fourth d1it will still be received
at the Union desk and any one who
desires to join it is requested to sign.

up at once.l
Report German Plottings to WilsonE
Washington, June 7.--L. W. Neiman,
editor of the Milwaukee Journal, and
Senator Housting laid before the presi-
dent this afternoon evidences of Ger-
man intrigue in Wisconsin. Sympath-
ivers with pro-German tendencies aret
conducting a general campaign to killc
the war spirit, the men reported. f

HONOR GUARD HOLDS
INITIAL MEETING
-xt ,- k( foFOR RELIEF OF TORNADO VlICTIMS
J ilue 15 ~ inWtrma G

Mi i mbers of the Honor guard hel
their irst meeting Wednesday after-
2 'oo.1 in Waterman gymnasium, at
which time Physical Director George
A. May explained the duties of this
body in connection with the approach-
ing commencement exercises.
The next meeting of the -Honor
suarl has been set for riday, June
15, at 5 o'clock, in Waterman gym-a
nasium. At this time the seniors r .
posing the guard will rehearse with
the pennants and emblems which will
be used in the commencement day
march. All members of the Honor
guard who were not present at yes-
tem'dav's nicetinf, are askc' 1 to get into
C-Glmmunication with their class pres-
ident at once. Otherwise new men
Will be appointeed in their places.
Awlnnounlce Sta ff
At Daily Dinner
Appointments for the editorial and
business staffs of The Michigan Daily
for next year were announced by Man-
aging Editor-elect H. C. L. Jackson,
'18, at tho first annual banquet of the
comlbined publications of the Univer-
shy lasi night at Mack's tea rooms.
They are us follows: News editor,
Robot t T. McDonald, '18; city editor,
Harry 1. Carey, '19; telegraph edi-
tors, C. S. Clark, '19, and Leonard
Nieter, '17; sports editor, E. L. Zeigler,
191L; asociate editor, James Scherm-
erhon Jr., '18; literary editor, Marian
0. Wilson, '18; exchange editor, Bruce
A. Swaney, '118; women's editor, Mil-
rAed C. Mlighell, '18; efficiency editor,
Albert E. Borne Jr., '18; assistant
usiyw'E, nanagers, Harry R. Louis,
'19; Bernard Wohl, '18; Paul E. Chol-
ette, '19, and Harold Makinson, '19.
Prof. W. G. Stoner of the Law school
acted as toastmaster and the follow-
ing toasts were given: "Next Year's
Daily," IH. C. L. Jackson, '18; "Young
Journalists," Mr. Lyman Bryson of the
rhetoric department; "Overcoming
Handicaps," E. A. Baumgarth, ' '17;
"The World Outlook," Prof. W. H.
lobbs of the geology department;
"Some Thoughts," Prof. F. N. Scott
of the rhetoric department.
Gold, silver, and bronze fobs were
presented to the members of the staffs
of the three publications.
FRESHMEN REGISTER

* Dismiss Engineers, Military Day

1*:
*:
3'
*k

All classes in the engineering
college .will be dimissed at 3'
o'clock this afternoon for the Mil-
itary Day exercises.
DEAN M. E. COOLEY.

*:
*

SELL TICKETS TODA
FOR SENIOR RECEPTION
(,NEIAL COMMITTEE ALONG
WITH CHAPERONES
ANNOUNCED
The tickets for the senior reception
which is to be held at the Armory
Monday evening, June 25, will go on
sale this morning. Seniors from the
different schools and colleges can se-
cure the tickets from the committee-
man representing their particular de
partment.
The general committee in charge of
the reception is as follows: E. F.
Walsh Jr., '17; R. B. Franz, '17A; A.
S. hart, '17; E. A. Bartelme, '17E; D.
M. Sarbaugh, '17L; E. R. Scarboro,
'17M; W. B. Steele, '17D; C. B. Mande-
ville, '17, and L. C. Heustis, '17P.
The literary students can secure their
tickets at the Union desk, the engi-
neers at the Alumnus desk in the en-
gineering building from 8 to 12 o'clock
this forenoon, the laws from the Law
library desk and the others from their
committeeman.
The sale of the tickets will be lim-
ited strictly to seniors and the whole
number to 125. It will be informal
entirely. The men will wear sport
coats and white flannels.
The chaperons who have been thus
far selected are: President Harry B.
Hutchins and Mrs. Hutchins, Secre-
tary Shirley W. Smith and Mrs. Smith,
Regent Junius E. Beal anl Mrs. Beal,
Registrar Arthur G. Hall and Mrs.
Hall, Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Jordan, and
the deans of all the colleges and
schools and their wives. More from
each department will be announced
later as they are selected.
Attention is called to the fact that
the reception is to be held on Monday
night instead of on Tuesday night as
is announced on some of the com-
mencement programs.
URGES PEOPLE TO
CUT FOOD WASTE
Iloover Advocates Food Consumption
le Restricted to a "Sensible
Ration"
Washington, June 7.-"He also
fights who helps a fighter fight." With
this slogan, Herbert Hoover, food dic-
tator, issued a statement this after-
noon to the American people calling
for a big reduction in food consump-
tion, and telling how waste can be les-
sened.
H I declared that food consumption
can be reduced if Americans use food;
not imperatively needed by our allies,1
substituting corn for wheat and poul-'
try and eggs for red meat. He advo-
cated voluntary restrictions "to a suf-
doient and sensible ration."
We must do what success in the
war denhands," said Hoover. "He also
fights who helps a fighter fight. Thatt
is the way we can all help win thist
war. If we don't help, the war may
not be won." 7

LOCAL BUSINESS MEN, CARPEN-
TERS AND MASONS COMBINE
IN OFFERING AID
START SATURDAY TO
CLEAR AWAY DEB.RIS
Latest Reports from District State
Four head and Three
Missing
More than $1,350 was subscribed by
the citizens of Ann Arbor last night
a the city hall for the relief of the
farmers who suffered gross losses
'rom the activities of the tornado.
1P. l nes; men offered their autos for
use, carpenters and masons their serv-
ices on Sunday, and local companies
agreed to sell te necessarysarticles
to the stricken people at cost.
Students to Aid Clean Up
Students who desire to aid in the
clearing away of the debris, so that the
farmers may rebuild their homes and
beeg to harvest their crops, should
meet at ' o'clock Saturday morning at
Che city hall, where autos will be in
r adinoss to transport them to the va-
riou districts. The men should come
v ltii the view of working the entire
ra. They should bring their lunches.
Notice- , ill be placed in the Union
:iiting whether students can aid Sun-
Citizens and students who desire to
lend their autos for service should
comniunicato with Henry Douglas,
Cambridge road. Subscriptions can
be mailed to Ross Granger, chairman
o? the soliciting committee.
Four Die in Storm
Later reports from the tornado dis-
trict state that four people are dead,
and three missing.
Mrs. Flo Brown of Chicago, who was
in Springsport, Oren Haselschwart, 18
years old, of Lima township, Washte-
nawv county, and Mrs. Mary Rentzler
and baby 14 months old of Salem are
the dead reported so far. Three are
missing from Washtenaw county:
Olive Parker, six years old, a Free-
dom township boy, name unknown,
and a Scio township hired ma
Twelve others were injured in Washte-
naw county.
Battle Creek Suffers Leavily
Battle Creek suffered heavily from
the wind. Five hundred thousand dol-
lars damage was lone, $100,000 of this
being suffered by the Michigan Carton
company, and 17 people were injured.
The other property damage done by
the storm was mostly confined to farm
lands, but the grand total will ex-
ceed $1,000,000.
The tornado (lid its first damage in
Climax, Kalamazoo county, went from
there to Calhoun county, then swooped
down on Battle Creek where it cut a
swath through two residence districts.
The wind here divided, one section go-
ing to Belvue in Eaton county, and
the other through part of Calhoun
coun,.' th, tornado coming together
-gai at Springsport village in Jack-
son county.
yonh 1 End of Storm
Gaining speed and force, the tor-
nado then swept north into Ingham
county, from there into Livingston
ceeunty, and then into Washtenaw,
;here it centered around Dexter and
Delhi. The storm dodged Ann Arbor
and descended on Salem village, con-
t:auir g on to Northville in Wayne
^;,t y. The last serious damage was
done near South Lyon in Oakland
,,nnty, adthough the tornado blew up
a °'aii of water at Cass lake, near
Pontiac.
A dispatch from Central City, Ky.,

tells of the death of five people and
the injury to 20 others by a large gale
which wrecked part of the town of
Bevier.

Yearl ig

Engineers Must Fill Out
Cards at Once

All freshman engineers who did not
;11 out registration cards at the fresh-
man assembly Wednesday are request-
ed to so at once at the office of the
secretary of the college of engineer-
ing, even though they do not expect
to be back next fall.
The class unanimously adopted the
report of the committee appointed to
devise means of enforcing attendance
at the monthly assemblies next year.
For the first absence 25 cents will be
added to each member's class dues and
50 cents for each additional absence
unless the ausent member presents a
certificate of attendance at class dur-
ing the assembly hour, within one
week. A doctor's certificate or a state-
ment by Assistant Dean Butts that the
student was excused from all classes
that day will also be accepted.
. C. E. Bottum, '20, was elected foot-
ball manager for next fall and an ef-
fort will be made to start practice as
soon as the men get back next se-
mester.
Students to Campaign for War Fund
Eight students of the University of
Wisconsin have left their class work'
to aid the Wisconsin Y. M. C. A. in a
campaign for $1,000,000 for a war
fund.

U

A Monthly Message
From Michigan,

Seniors

Now that you are leaving Ann Arbor for the last time
Subscribe for tePlcigan lumnus

epecial Raeqto Se-alors

Published by
Alumni

Every senior who pays before Commencement will reeive an oficial alumni button or pin, upon presentation
o1 solicitors receipt at Alumni Room, Memorial Hall.

w.:.a :.

One Year - - $1.00
Three Years - $4.00
(Regular Rate $.200 a,
year)

I

_. .~

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan