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June 07, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-06-07

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WEATHER
AND WARMER
TODAY

AobP A6F
ARW t an-

jDatt

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I'

PRICE FIVE CENTB~

XVII. No. 179.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 1917.

PRICE FIVE CENT,

iPECIAL'DRILLS TO
CLOSE TRAINING OF
DIFFICULT SEASON

BLIC DEMONSTRATION
BENtEFIT OF VISITORS
PLANNED

FOR

LAW STUDENTS WILL
COMPETE FOR PRIZE
Engineers Will Go Through All Forms
of Arm Manual Prae.
Si ticedI
After months of interrupted and
somewhat handicapped training, Mich-
igan's military organizations will con-
clude the season's work with a public
demonstration of special drills at 3
o'clock tomorrow afternoon on Ferry
fid.
The law students will give a com-
petetive drill for a cup donated by
Nathan , Kaufman, '17L. The judges
will be Major C. W. Castle and Major
Wilson. The literary students are in-
vited to send companies to the field
as early as possible. The engineering
regiment will assemble promptly at
3 o'clock east of the Engineering
building and from here will march to
the field accompanied by the engineer-
ing band.
The program to be followed out will
be in part as follows: (1) Competetive
drill by the law companies, 3 to 4
o'clock; grand mount by Company D
engineers, Captain Montelius Franks
commanding, 4 to 4:30 o'clock. (3)
Extended order by Company A engi-
neers, Captain Franks commanding,
4:30 to 4:45 o'clock. (4) Pup-tent drill
by Company C engineers, Captain Tay-
lor commanding, 4:45 to 5 o'clock. (5)'
Bayonet drill by Company E engineers,
Captain Brazell commanding, 5 to 5:15
o'clock. (6) Close. order drill by Com-
pany B engineers, Captain Anderson
commanding, 5:15 to 5:30 o'clock. (7)
Signal work by Company G engineers,
Captain Lyons commanding, 5:30 to
5:45 o'clock; manual of arms by com-
pany F engineers, Captain ,Schirmer
commanding. (9) Review of entire
military organization.
Commerce Club Elects Officers
Officers for next year. were elected
by the Commerce club at a meeting
held last night in the society's rooms.
R. C. Patterson, '18, was elected
president; vice-president, H. Giessing,
'18; secretary, C. Potters, '18, and
treasurer, W. T. Miller, '19.
A farewell dance will be given by
the club from 9 o'clock to 2 o'clock
tomorrow at the Packard academy.
Fischer's orchestra will furnish the
music.
Probation Officers Hold Convention
Pittsburg, Pa., June 5.-Five hun-
dred probation offiers, judges and
others interested in probation work
attended the ninth annual conference
of the National Probation association
here today. The sessions last three
days. Albert J. Sargent of Boston,
president, spoke today, touching on
many of the problems in connection
with juvenile probation which are to
be discussed.
Kathryn Graunt, '19 of Dletoit, Eii'aged
Announcement of the engagement
of Kathryn Grant, '19, of Detroit, to
Warren E. Talcott, '16L, of Detroit
was made at a dinner held last night
in the Westminster house. The wed-
ding will take place in tie early part
of July.
Carlton Sabiu, '18E, Elected President
Carlton Sabin, '13E, was elected
president of the Engineering society
in the reballot taken yesterday. Sabin
and N. H. Ibsen, '187 received the
same number of votes in the first bal-
lot.

fCornell taises $1f00 A mlbi vlance Fund
Tthaca, N. ., June 6.-Flag day at
Cornell university resulted in the ad-
dition of $290 to the women's ambul-
ance fund, raising the fund to approx-
imately $1,000.
Publishers to Banquet Tonight
Men of the University publications
will banquet at Mack's tea room to-

FOUR INITIATED BY
PI DELTA EPSILON
lHonor'ary Journalistic Fraternity
Takes in Men Mem-
bers
Four men were initiated into Kappa
chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon, national
honorary journalism fraternity, yes-
terday afternoon. After carrying out
the roles of reporters on State street,
the initiates were given the formal
work of the chapter, after which a
banquet was tendered to them at
Mack's tea rooms.
The initiates are: A. L. Kirkpatrick,
'18; B. R. D'Ooge, '19; C. C. Andrews,
'18, and C. Philip Emery, '18.
PEACE WITHOUT VICTORY
IMPOSSIBLE SAYS IBOT
FIIENCH PREMIER STATES THAT
NATION IS IN ACCORD
WITH U. S.
Paris, June 6. - Announcing that
France is in entire accord with the
United States, Premier Ribot this aft-
ernoon declared to a special sitting of
the senate that there can be no
"peace without victory",
"It is necessary to speak clearly,"
the premeier asserted. "We are in ac-
cord with the United States. Alsace-
Lorraine must be returned. No
Frenchman dare say that there can be
peace until that is accomplished.
"We do not want indemnities but
reparation for damages. We are mor-
ally backed by the world in this de-
mand. It is also necessary that there
be a guarantee for peace. The best
solution would be for Europe to be
so constituted that all nations be
masters of their own destinies. There
can be no peace without victory."
Ribots speech was made at a special
meti; of the senate, called in re-
sponse to Ribot's statement that he
wished to explain the 7rench position
as goon as possible
Work for Summer
At Uivpersity Y
OrgnuaL o i iHu's YNmny Positions
Open for Students iw Vaca-
fion
"We have more jobs open to stu-
dents this summer than we can hope
to fill," said R. F. Wuensch, '17. em-
ployment secretary of the University
Y. M. C. A..
During the 1-2t two months more
than 500 letters have been received
at the secretary's office offering all
kinds of work for men who want em-
ployment for the summer months.
Most of this is sales work. Liberal
commissions and salaries are offer-
ed by various firms to men who will
represent them in their home towns
this summer. There is also a big de-
mand for factory help.
There are numerous opportunities
for summer employment in summer re-
sorts in Michigan and the surrounding
states, and there are also a number
of positions open in advertising work.
Anyone wishing to see the employment
secretary, will find him in his office
in Lane hall between the hours of 3
and 6 o'clock daily.
ANN ARBOR BIRD CLUB HOLDS
LAST MEETING OF YEAR TODAY

The Ann Arbor Bird club will hold
its last meeting of the school year at
7:30 o'clock today in room 355 Natural
Science building.
A miscellaneous program has been
arranged, including the following:
Descriptions of late nesting birds of
Ann Arbor, illustrated with lantern
slides, by Mr. Norman A. Wood; birds
that are now nesting in School Girls'
glen, by Mr. Donald Savery; birds that
have occupied bird houses this spring,
by Mr. Carl Huber; report of the
treasurer, by Mr. H. T. Sherman, and
a brief account of the season's ac-
tivities, by Mr. R. W. Hegner. All
members are requested to be present
and others are welcome to attend.
Seniors May Join Alumni Association
Seniors will have an opportunity to
take out their memberships in the
Alumni associaton, which includes
subscription to the Alumnus. today
and tomorrow at a table in the cor-
ridor of University hall.

START OR6ANIZING
FIR ST0 RAFTR MY

ltegstration
ing

RUSH ALL PREPARATIONS TO'
EQUIP 625,000 MEN FULLY
More Than 50 Per Cent Claim Exemp-
tion; Army and National
Guard Gain
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.);
Washington, June 6.-America's first
citizen army of 625,000 men began to
take definite shape today.
While registration in some districts
fell below the war department's ex-
pectations, others rolled up astonish-
ing totals. In some Pacific coast sec-
tions half the population registered.
Figures continue to come in slowly to-
night. Returns are not expected to be
complete for some days.
The next great task is that of dis-
posing of exemption claims. More
than 50 per cent of those signing up,
yesterday claimed exemption. It will
be necessary to call 2,000,000 in order
to get the 625,000, the war department
believes. Appointment of an exemp-
tion board will be the next step.
Meanwhile, America's war machines
are rushing preparations for equip-
ment for the first army. Contracts
for shoes apd other necessities are be-
ing placed rapidly. Rifles and ammuni-
tion are being manufactured as quick-
ly as munitions plants can turn them
out. When the 625,000 are called it is
expected to have the equipment ready.
Before the first draft drawing alle
cripples and other physically disabled
will be exempted. Then in two weeks
will come the drawing, and after that
the physical examinations. Gains ins
the regular army and national guard
recruiting are such that officials be-
lieve 'that- it will be unnecessary to1
employ conscription to fill the ranks
of these units for war strength. The
army today needs 82,000 to reach its
war power.
In many places registration con-:
tinued today, so as to take care of the:
overflow. In Missouri, Illinois, and1
other mid-western states heavy storms
are hindering reports. Severalccoun-
ties in Missouri are entirely cut off
from communication.
"GARGOLENSIAN" IS TITLE OF
HUMOR ISSUI O APPEAR SOON
Abandoning its policy of good-nat-
ured satire, it is rumored, the grin-
ning Gargoyle that symbolizes Michi-
gan's humor publication will eschew
the pen for the more forceful sledge
hammer, and with blows iconoclastic
proceed to smash many a campus idol
in the June issue which is soon to
make its appearance. The number
will be known as the "Gargoylensian"
and will recount the year's events in
a manner which is said to make plain
the woeful deficiencies of the official
year book.
Prominent members of the graduat-
ing class, honor societies, and campus
activities will suffer complete expos-
ure, 'tis whispered, at the hands of the
relentless ihage breaker. The dedica-
tion will remain a secret with the edi-
torial staff until the issue has been
placed on sale. Numerous "snapshots"
will enliven the pages, and merry
quips of modern vintage will make
for the success of the number.
BACON, '02, WANTS TO MEET
ST ENTS WHO CAN INTERPRET
Francis Bacon, '02. state director
of the intelligence bureau, wishes to
meet personally as soon as possible,
all those students who can act as in
$erpreters for any of the European
languages. He will be at the Union
every day between 12 and 1 o'clock
or at any other time by special ar-

rangement.
Union Dance Tickets on Sale Today
The tickets for the regular Satur-
day evening dance at the Union will go
on sale at the Union desk at 4 o'clock
this afternoon. The committee in
charge of this week's dance is: A. S.
Hart, '17, Chairman; D. L. Van Dusen,
'18; E. T. Jones, '19, and H. R. Evert,
'20E. The chaperones are Mr. and
Mrs. Jonah S. Scovel and Mr. and
Mrs. J. J. Walser.

Figures Show 'Astonish-
Totals in Some
Sections

BAND WILL LEAD IN
CAP NIGHT PARADE
Free Preformances at Orphenni and
Wuerth Theaters at
10:30 O'clock
The University band will meet at
7:15 o'clock tomorrow night on the
diagonal walk, immediately in the rear
of the Law building, to form the head
of the line marching to Cap night cele-
bration. Seniors, juniors, sophomores,
and freshmen will gather in the order
mentioned behind the band at the
same time.
All seniors are expected to wear
their caps and gowns and all classes
should bring their class headgear to
add to the collection which will be
sent to Belgium. Freshmen are par-
ticularly urged not to cut or in any
other way mutilate their pots or
toques.
Through the courtesy of Mr. J. F.
Wuerth, the Orpheum and Wuerth the-
aters will provide free entertainment
for the lower classes of the Univer-
sity at 10:30 o'clock. Freshmen are
to attend the performance in the Or-
pheum and sophomores that in the
Wuerth.
Announcement of further details for
tomorrow night's celebration will be
made in tomorrow morning's paper.1
DETROIT REPPORTS BIG*
BOND SALE TO MVCAOOO0
CITY OVER-SUBSCRIBES $33,000,000
QUOTA BY MORE THAN
$2,000,000
Detroit, June 6.-The Detroit opera
house was unable to hold the crowd
which surged against its doorsrthis
afternoon to hear Secretary McAdoo,
who arrived in Detroit shortly before
1 o'clock.
Detroit is the first city in the coun-
try to report to the secretary that she
has not only subscribed thefull quota
of Liberty loan bonds, but has passed
the mark, $33,000,000, by more than
$2,000,000.
McAdoo went to the Detroit board of
commerce building where he addressed
a thousand people. After the meeting
he was entertained by the reception
committee, until his train left for St.
Louis at 6:35 o'clock. Showers did
not interfere with the patriotic recep-
tion in which about 50,000 men, wom-
en, and children took part. Nor did it
stop any man or boy in the throng
from removing his hat with the sing-
ing of "America."
SENIORS TODANCE
Reception Decided on for Commence-
ment Week
Plans are almost completed for the
senior reception to be held during
commencement week, from 9 to 2
o'clock Monday, June 25. It has been
decided by the committee in charge
to make the affair informal following
the precedent established by the class
of 1916. Sport suits will be in vogue.
Decorations, refreshments, and elec-
trical effects are now under considera-
tion.
A limited number of 125 tickets at
$3.00 a piece will be sold. They will
go on sale by the chairmen of the
committees of each department tomor-
row at places to be announced in to-'
morrow morning's Daily. The tickets

will be apportioned as follows: Lits
40, engineers 30, laws 20, dents 14,
medics 10, pharmics 5, architects 4,
and homoeops 2. In case tickets ap-
portioned to any department are not
sold by Wednesday they will be sold at
large.
The chairmen of the department
committees met last night at the Un-
ion and elected the following officers:
General chairman, Edward F. Walsh
Jr., '17; general secretary Robert B.
Frantz, '17A; general treasurer, A. S.
Hart, '17, and general auditor, Eugene
A. Bartelme, '17E.
Rebecca Greenburg Wins Prize
Miss Rebecca Greenburg, '19, was
awarded- last night the Menorah prize
of $100 for an essay on "The Preserva-
tion of Jewish Nationality in Amer-
ica."
The prize was given. by Juluis Ros-
enwald of Chicago, and the judges
were: Prof. R. M. Wenley, Rabbi Leo
M. Franklin of Detroit. and Prof. I.
Leo Sharfman.

HOLD MASS MEETING FOR
WOMEN THIS FTERNOON
SERVICES IN WAR TO BE SUBJECT
OF PATRIOTIC AD-
DRESSES
At the patriotic mass meeting for
women at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, activities
of women in behalf of their country
will be the general subject of the ad-
dresses delivered.
Rev. Caroline Bartlet Crane, state;
chairman of the women's committee
for the council of defense, will be the
chief speaker. The council is the
clearing house for all patriotic organ-
izations of women.
Mrs. Henry B. Joy of Detroit will
appear in the uniform worn by women;
in the national service camps, and will
speak on the subject, "The Sixth Na-
tional Service School."
Work being done by the Daughters
of the American Revolution will be
discussed by Mrs. W. H. Wait of Ann
Arbor, who is a member of the na-
tional war relief committee of the D.
A. R. and state regent. Frederick
Stevens, state chairman of the Red
Cross, will give the closing speech.
President Harry B. Hutchins will pre-
side at the meeting.
2,198 REGISTERED
IN CITY FOR DRAFT
Washtenaw County Sign 4,660 Men for,
First Conscript
Armies
Complete returns of the registration
for all males between the ages of 21
and 30 in Washtenaw county show a
total of 4,660, with the city of Ann
Arbor furnishing 2,198 of this num-
ber.
Of the total county registration,
3,990 whites and 115 colored people
were either American citizens or de-
clared themselves desirous of stand-1
ing with the United States in the pres-
ent crisis. Two thousand three hun-
dred and nineteen whites, or 58 per
cent of the above number, and 75 col-
ored people, or 65 per cent of the col-
ored total, claimed exemption on va-
rious grounds.
Several more registration cards
were received yesterday through the
mail. A final report for the governor
was prepared and sent to Lansing yes-
terday.
Sheriff Lindenschmidt made the
statement that he was assisted by one
of the best staffs in the country, and
that no trouble whatever had been ex-
perienced throughout the county. The
board in control of registration ex-
pressed themselves as well pleased
with the attitude shown by the men.
NATIONAL TENNIS CIIAMI ON
ENLISTS IN NAVAL RESERVES
New York, June 6.-With William M.
Johnston, former national ten
champion, enlisted in the naval re-
serve, only two of America's "ranking
ten" have so far failed to enter some
branch of military service. One is
Ichiya Kumagae, the Japanese, and
the other is R. Lindley Murray, who is
married, and engaged in chemical eng-
ineering labors of importance in car-
rying on the war.
Professor Brumm to Speak in Milan
"Finding Oneself" is the subject of
a commencement address by Prof.
John R. Brumm next Thursday in Mi-

lan, Mich. The following day Pro-
fessor Brumm will speak in Dryden,
Mich., his subject being "Education
and Life."
Later in the month Prof. Brumm will
speak to the graduating class of De-
troit Eastern high school and to the
class in Imlay City.
Announce Engagement of A. Martens
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Eddy of May-
wood, Ill., have announced the engage-
ment of their daughter, Margaret Ray
Eddy, to Albert C. Martens, '17.

TORNADO SWEEPS THROUGH LOWER
PART OF STATE INJURING MANY
AND DAMAiGING MUCH PROPERTY

STORM LASTS BUT FEW MINUTES
AN )D IS MOST SEVERE
IN YEARS
TOWNS SURROUNDING
ANN ARBOR HARD HIT
Roads to Dexter Blocked by Fallen
Trees; Wind Plans Many
Strange Tricks
Several people were injured, and
unlimited damage was done by a ter-
riffle tornado which swept through
Dexter and the surrounding. country
at 1 ,O o'clock yesterday afternoon.
The storm lasted for 20 minutes dur-
ing which time the town was in almost
absolute darkness.
Houses were wrecked, trees up-
rooted, poles blown down, and roads
blocked by the tornado which left
acres of debris in its wake. Order
was brought out of confusion immedi-
ately after the passage of the cyclone
by the farmers bordering on its path
who cleared the roads for traffic. The
main road to Dexter, however, was
blocked by a mammoth tree which was
too large to be hauled away quickly.
Battle Creek Strck
This cyclone was the tail of the one
which swept through Battle Creek at
1 o'clock, damaging the Michigan Car-
ton company to an extent of $100,000.
The roof of the press room collapsed,
burying 28 presses, and more than
140 men and girls. Many were in-
jured. The main damage was dohe
along Merchen street and Battle Creek
street, where the cyclone left a path
of ruins 100 feet wide. Northwest of
Jackson at Strimrpgsburg two were
killed and five seriously injured.
Mr. J. S. Obrien of Detroit, travel-
ing for the Osborne Calendar com-
pany of New York, noticing the ap-
proach of the tornado sought refuge in
a D. U. R. waiting station a little ways
out of Dexter. The tornado lifted the
station up, carried it for a short dis-
tance and dropped it Mr. Obrien Was
found wandering in an adjacent field.
He sustained a smashed nose, crushed
head, and a broken arm. He was sent
to tie Maplehurst hospital.
Wife 11a Narrow Escape
Mr. Oit, driving with his wife from
Detroit to his home in Albany, drove
into a barn for shelter. The barn and
automobile w cre blown away. Mr.
Ott received a double fracture in his
leg. His wife escaped injury.
Two men who were driving Ford
automobiles to Grand Rapids from De-
troit were caught in the path of the
storm. Telephone wires which were
blown down in front of them caught in
the wheels of the .car and turned it
turtle. Th#' driver was slightly cut
on the forehead by pieces of the wind-
shield. First aid was administered to
him in Dexter. The men left the de-
molished Ford by the roadside an
continue in the undamaged car to
Grn iaiu..apids.
Dexer Untouched
The main center of Dexter was left
untouched, the neighboring territory
was the only part to suffer damage.
' communications to Dexter are im-
"nssible. The wires which carry pow-
er from Bartan dam to the city were
completely destroyed.
The farra of Jay Smith was entirely
ruined. T'he second story of his brick
house was carried away, leaving lit-
te but the foundation in good order.
.\ I the barns, fences, coops and trees
and fihe orchard were dismantled. H.
C. Clements, who was hitching up his
horse in the field, was uninjured by
the tornado.
The house of John Helber, two and
a half miles outside of Dexter, was de-

stroyed. Many hogs and chickens
were killed. The barn and silo of
Andraw Hughes was ripped up. The
farm and home of James Welch, near
Ann Arbor, was also struck by the
tornado. The kitchen of Mr. Allen's
home was torn from the side of his
house and moved to the center of his
yard.
Leaves Path of Debris
The tornado left a solid path of
debris one mile west of Northfield.
Many cattle and horses were found
(Continued on Page Six.)

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