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June 05, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-06-05

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED--PROB-
ABLY RAIN TODAY

I 'ill
4

fC Sr itan

&t1i

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 177.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

AILITARY LEADERS
START DAGRU
REVOLT IN, CHINA

LAW GRADUATE IS
PHILIPPINE JUSTICE

i(n('Vrge

Arthur Malcolm, 06TL, Ap-
poited to Supreme

11 PROVINCES NO LONGER
OGNIZE PEKING GOV-
ERNMENT

REC-I

THREE PROVINCES TO
SUPPORT' PRESIDENT
Vice-president Resigns Post; Militar-
ists Demanding New
Election
San Francisco, June . 4. - Eleven
provinces of China, including the
province Chi-Li, in which Peking is
situated, now no longer recognize the
authority of the Peking government,
according to official reports received
by the Chinese World here. The prov-
inces of Kwang-Tung, Kwang-Si, and
Yun-Nan are supporting President Li-
Yuan-Hung.
The provisional assembly of Kwang-
Tung, in assuring its loyal support to
the president and parliament, demands
tha't the military governors be dis-
missed aid punished.
Three Provinces Loyal
It seems probble that should the
military governors persist in their
revolutionary course the three loyal
south China provinces, Kwang-Tung,
Kwang-Si, and Yun-Nan, will rise in
support of the president. At present
the situation is serious and the presi-
dent virtually powerless.
Vice-president Sang Kwok Chew of
China tendeed his resignation to
President Li Yuan Hung today, it was
officially announced. The same mes-
sage said that President Hung had is-
sued a proclamation calling upon all
opposing factions to unite in declaring
his own neutrality in the troubles.
Plans War on Germany
According to official information to-
day President Li Yuan Hung intends
tomrrow to introduce a bill taking in
a declaration of war against Germany
if there is a quorum present in parlia-
ment. , The presence of a quorum
however, seems doubtful.
Want President to Resign
Attempts are being made to influ-
ence President Li-Yuan-Hung to re-
sign rather than to dissolve parlia-
ment, the object being to throw the
blame for any disturbance upon the
militarists. The president has issued
a mandate pleading with Chang-Hsun,
the commander of the government
troops at Nanking and Feng-Kwo-
Chang, to come to Peking and affect
a compromise. The commander has
accepted and is coming to Peking to-
day.
The militarists are demanding a
new election immediately for the pur-
pose of securing a workable constitu-
tion.
MISS CAROL WADHAMS PLAYS
PIANO GRADUATION RECITAL
Miss Carol Wana Wadhams of this
city played her graduation recital at
the University 'School of Music yes-
terday evening. She has been study-
ing piano with Mr. Albert Lockwood
for the past two or three years.
Among her numbers last evening
Cyril Scott's "Garden of Soul Sym-
pathy," Grahms' "Capriccio," Op. 76,
No. 2, "On Wings of Song" by Mendels-
sohn-Liszt and the Chopin "Etudes,"
Op. 10, Nos. 3 and 5, were especially
well received,
PROF. W. L. SCHURZ TEACHES
IN KANSAS SUMMER SCHOOL
William Lytle Schurz, assistant pro-
fessor of history, left for Lawrence,
Kan., yesterday to accept the position
of instructor of history at the Uni-

versity of Kansas summer school.
History concerning the relations of the
Far East and Latin-American history
will be his main subjects of instruc-
tion.
All examinations in his courses at
this university will be conducted by
one of his assistants. He will return
-+ . f

Bench
George Arthur Malcolm,. 'OGL, Ma-
nila, P. I., who was recently nominated
as associate justice of the supreme
court of the Philippine islands by
President Wilson, owes his nomination
largely to the recommendation of Sec-
retary of War Baker given him a few
weeks ago by Dean Henry M. Bates
of the Law school.
Judge Malcolm entered the Univer-
sity from Concord, Mich., in 1900 and
was graduated from the literary col-
loge in 1904. In 1906 he received his
degree from the Law school, graduat-
ing among the highest members of his
class. While in the University he was
an editor of the Law Review.
Immediately after his graduation he
went to Manila to practice law, obtain-
ing a professorship in the University
of the Philippines a short time after-
wards. Later he was made dean of
the law school of that university.
TO ELIMINATE POVERTY
IS PLAN OF LUKE NORTH

SINGLE TAX BILL AS SIGNED

TN

CALIFORNIA IS TO RAISE
LARGE REVENUES
"Radicalism so far has been a fail-
ure," said Mr. Luke North in his ad-
dress last evening in Lane hall on the
subject, "The Great Adventure." "It
has accomplished nothing except to
give us the personal, satisfaction of
wrangling over questions. We have
talked anarchism and socialism, but
we have allowed hundreds of children
to grow up in poverty and learn de-
generacy on our street corners. Now
we propose to act, to wipe out poverty
in the present generation Instead of
waiting several centuries."
The single tax bill, as signed by
137,000 petitioners in California, simply
states that on and after Jan. 1, 1919,
public revenue shall be raised from
the value of the land itself, irrespec-
tive of the improvements made on it.
The idea, as Mr. North explained it, is
to make it unprofitable for anyone to
hold idle land, and extensive ranches
will be more fairly apportioned.
Mr. North's object in coming Eastto
spread the news of the California cam-
paign is to arouse interest in a move-
ment which he believes will spread
all over the country as soon as it
goes through in California. He hopes
also that those interested in further-
ing the movement will give financial
aid, since it is a battle not for any
one party or state but for the good of
humanity.
U. S. Nay Impose
Advertising Tax
Senate Agree to Financial Committee;
Likely to Assess Newspapers
and Periodicals
Washington, June 4.-- The senate
financial committee today tentatively
agreed to impose a two per cent ad-
vertising tax on all newspapers and
periodicals. The committee has un-
der consideration. exempting those
newspapers and periodicals from ad-
vertising tax whose yearly profits do
not exceed $3,000.
Its vote in favor of the tax may be
amended later, but it is not likely.
It was the opinion of a great majority
that an advertising tax is preferred at
this time to an increase in second class
postal rates such as was proposed by
:Postmaster-General Burleson.
Dean J. 0. Schlotterbeck is Buried
As a last tribute to Dean Julius Otto
Schlotterbeck, about 70 students from
the College of Pharmacy attended in
a body the funeral at 3:30 o'clock Sun-
day afternoon. Many alumni of the
University also were present, accom-
panying the body to Forest Hill ceme-
tery. The Rev. Henry Tatlock de-
livered the funeral sermon.
Duke Neville Transferred to Nagasaki
E. L. Neville, '07, better known here
as Duke Neville, who is in the United
States consular service, has been
transferred from Formosa toNagasaki,
Japan.

PRUSSIAN TROOPS PUSH
BA 8CKCANAIN FORCES
u eCOrO US Al) A Nl FOLLOWEDl
I' REtII'RE A; TE'lU'FO0NS
LOSE EAVILY
By William P. Simms
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
With the British Armies Afield, June
4.---Canadian troops were back today
in the same trenches which they oc-
cupied last iriday, after a victory and
a defeat around Avion.
Prussians Sunday afternoon retook
an electric light station east of Avion
in a mad, furious attack, disregarding
totally losses inflicted upon them.
Thus they undid all the work of the
Canadians in gaining control of that
spot.
Throughout Sunday a steady bom-
bardment was kept up. Firing was
so intense late Sunday that the Can-
adians decided to withdraw to their
previous positions.
Nake Perfect Withdrawal
So perfect was the withdrawal of
the Canadians that they took 112 pris-
oners with them, 90 unwounded. The
German victory was made possible by
the flat topography of the country.
Around south of Lens there are no
covering ridges.
Artillery Fire Accurate
In their artillery fire the Canadians
levelled German trenches and de-
stroyed even small covers of ruins.
When the German attack came the
Canadians had to defend themselves
in the open field.
British artillery was active at a
number of points on the front today.
Prolonged actions of the infantry was
broken by such local engagements as
that of Sat-urday. Such tactics by
British army chiefs set the Germans'
nerves on edge.
POFPWILGUS ACEPTS
A1WCOMPAIES' LAG
COMMANDING OFFICER SPEAKS IN
BEHALF OF BATTAL.
ION
(The following acceptance was de-
livered by Prof. Horace L. Wilgus of
the Law school, on the occasion of the
presentation by the members of the
faculty of the Law school to the three
companies composing the department-
al battalion, of a regulation flag, to be
carried by each company in turn while
at drill. Professor Wilgus is the com-
manding officer of the battalion, on
whose behalf he accepted the banner.)
My first distinct recollection, as a
child, is of this flag. During the Civil
war, a group of men who had been to
a rally to declare the Civil war a fail-
ure, stopped in front of my father's
house and threatened to cut down the
flag pole that bore aloft this banner,
and my father promised to shoot the
first one that touched it. After a little
parley they went on and left the flag
unmolested.
In this way there was impressed on
my baby mind something of the signif-
icance of the flag; I was close enough
to the Civil war to know at first hand
something of the sacrifice, the sorrow,
and the strength of courage and de-
votion of those who went to battle un-
der it and for it.
We all know something of what it

cost and what it stands for.
One hundred xnd forty-two years
ago. April 19, the "shot that was heard
around the world" was fired at Lexing-
ton and Concord, in defense of liberty
(Continued on Page Four.)
UNIVERSITY AMBULANCE 'UNITS
TO BE MUSTERED lN SOON?
Indications are that the three am-
bulance corps organized from Univer-
sity students by the intelligence bur-
eau soon will be mustered in by the
government, according to a telegram
received by Francis Bacon, '02, secre-
tary of the state bureau.
The telegram which comes from the
headquarters of the bureau at Wash-
ington states that the surgeon general
has telegraphed the commanding gen-
eral of the central department at Chi-
cago to send medical officers to en-
roll all university ambulance units
in his department at once.

"REMEMBER ROOMIE AT THE FRONT"
--->
! t4 it i
1 Il. l { II' Eli
Io-
A --
K---- { 4
' ry !V at!"f".,frsTT - I')

FILL VACNT SENIOR LIT
COMMITTEE, POSITIONS
GUARD OF HONOR NAMED .TO
SERVE ON COflIMENCE-
IENT DAY
Appointments of members of the
senior literary class to take places on
senior committees left vacant by the
departure from the University of form-
er members of these committees are
announced by President E. E. Pardee
as follows:
Class flay committee-Harold M.
Johnston, chairman; R. C. Hunter, and
Frank A. Taber. Reception commit-
tee--E. F. Walsh, chairman; A. S.
Hart, F. M. Adams, and H. M. Petrie.
Sing committee---DeForest S. Rood. In-
vitation committee-James E. Perry.
In accordance with the usual cus-
tom at Commencement exercises, the
faculty, Regents and invited guests'
will be accompanied by a guard of
honor.
Members of the senior literary class
appointed to this body are as follows:
Emblem bearers-E. E. Mack and
Cecil F. Cross. Guard of honor-C. E.
Bailey, E. A. Baumgarth, Elmer Bran-
dell, Ralph K. Carman, Ralph M. Car-
son, Edwin R. Christie, Conrad N.
Church, Jack H. Connelly, Geoffrey A.
Dorsey, Kenneth A. Easlick, H. A.
Fitzgerald, Ralph E. Folz, Sam Geisen-
berger, E. M. George, A. J. Gornetzky,
A. S. Hart, Henley Hill, R. C. Hunter,
E. A. Hyman, Clare M. Jickling, Har-
old M. Johnston, John W. Langs,
Frank T. Magennis, Roy L. Muskatt,
W. D. Nance, W. K. Niemann, Leon-
ard W. Nieter, Harold E. O'Brien,
Thomas B. Ogelthorpe, H. M. Petrie,
John C. Robbins, De Forest S. Rood,
C. Vernon Sellers, Samuel J. Slavens,
Charles M. Sporley, B. W. Taleen, Rob-
ert W. Turner, Lawrence W. Van
Aken, E. F. Walsh, Lester E. Water-
bury, C. F. Watson, Philip P. Weis-
berg, William J. Willson, and Marsh
B. Woodruff.
The first meeting of the Honor
Guard will be held at 4:30 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon in Dr. May's of-
fice at the gymnasium, at which time
the details of the commencement
parade will be explained. It is es-
sential that every member of the guard
be present at that time. Any of the
above-named senior lits who find it
impossible to attend Wednesday's
meeting are requested to notify Par-
dee at 1223-M between 11 and 12:30
o'clock Wednesday.

WILL DRAFT 826,000
I MEN ON FIRST CALL1

EXTRA 125,000 TO FILL VACANCIES
CAUSED BY DEATH OR
SICKNESS
By Carl I). Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, June 4.--The. govern-
ment intends to draft 625,000 men on
the first call following registration.
This information was given the senate
military committee today by General
Crowder.
The 125,000 men above the first 500,-
000 increment will be placed in train-
ing camps to fill vacanci'es left by
men withdrawing through sickness or
death. Crowder emphasized that no
class of men would be exempt as a
whole from service, since such a sys-
tem would endanger plans to get men
enough out of the 625,000.
[)epartment to Enforce Conscription
Meanwhile the department of justice
sidetracked all other business for the
enforcement of the selective service
act. It issued this warning, "All other
matters in the department of justice
for the time being will be subordinated
for the enforcement of the conscrip-
tion act. Whenever necessary assist-
ants of federal, state, and local of-
tleers will be sought. Agents through-
out the country have been instructed
accordingly.
Fix Bail According to Case
"The committee magistrates will be
asked to fix bail as high as practicable
in each case, higher bail being asked
for individuals who have tried to in-
duce other persons to evade the law,
or have tried to interfere with of-
ficers in performing their duties than
those who fail to register."
AVOID SUGAR FAMINE
(overniment Co-,gperates with Allies to
Prevent Scarcity
By Robert J. Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, June 4.- Action has
been taken presumably with co-opera-
tion between the United States and all
her allies to allay the threatened
shortage of sugar this fall. This -be-
came known today when Herbert C.
hoover, food administrator, stated that
steps had been accomplished that
would avoid a famine in sugar.
Hoover's statement followed the
publication of information he recently
furnished to the senate agricultural
committee. Hoover's statement to the
United Press this afternoon said. "I
made no statement for publication
upon the subject of sugar. I did say
that unless order was restored in Cuba
we would be short of sugar because
of inability to secure harvest of the
forthcoming crop. Since that time ac-
tion has been taken and ample sup-
plies assured so that there will be no
famine in sugar."

CHALLENGE MUS
BE ANSWEREDBY.
MENREITRN
REGISTRAR HALL EXPLAINS :
RULES AT HILL AUDITOR.
IUM MASS MEETING
ENCOURAGE MARINE
CORPS ENLISTMENTS
Mean Cooley Announces Coming of
Examining Surgeon on
June 10
"The challenge you must answer to-
morrow when you go to register is:
Shall a government conceived by the
people, of the people and for the peo-
ple continue to exist, or perish from
the earth?" said the Rev. George L.
Cady of Lansing to the men of reg-
istration age at the civic pre-registra
tion mass meeting last night in Hill
auditorium.
The mammoth meeting at which
registration was explained by Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall, followed an im-
pressive parade. All civic and mili-
tary organizations of the city' and
University assembled at the city hall
at 7:30 o'clock and followed the Uni-
versity band through the city to Hill
auditorium.
"Like a Football Send-off"
Hon. George Burke, in his opening
remarks 'as presiding officer, said:
"Like on a night before a great foot-
ball game, we are assembled here to
give the boys a great send off. We are
going into the international fray to-
morrow and we are here to put the
fight into the boys."'
Rev. George L. Cady presented the
issues. at stake in the war and stated
that there never could be peace on
earth while a crowned head ruled a
mighty people, and whose supreme
ambition it was to dominate the world
with an irresponsible government
which was entirely out of accord with
true democracy. To register was
simply to put your name to a pledge
that if called upon, you would fight
for the ideals our fathers attained with
the sacrifice of their blood.
Dean Cooley Reads Telegram'
At the close of the address, Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley read the follow-
ing telegram to the audience:
"The Secretary,
"University f Michigan,
"Ann Arbor.
"Doctor L. D. McMillan, medical re-
serve corps, graduate University of
Michigan, examining surgeon for ma-
rine corps in Michian, will arrive in
Ann Arbor Sunday, June 10. Will ex-
amine applicants for enlistment In
marine corps. Request announcement
be made at mass, meeting tonight and
that examination be permitted in the
University gymnasium. In no way to
interfere with registration. Enlist-
ment need be for war only. Country's
first line of defense. Active service,
Opportunity for promotion on merit.
"MORRISON,
"Captain Marine Corps."
Dean Cooley went on to explain'the
nature of the marine corps and its
significance as a part of the nation's
defense. "It is the first military unit
in any war to land on foreign soil, and
serves in every part of the world. The
corps was composed of 15,000 men
until a recent act of congress in-
creased it to 30,000. The extra 15,000

are wanted at once," said Dean Cooley.
Registration Process Explained
Registrar Hall explained in detail
the process of registration, and urged
that men formulate their answers be-
fore they come to the booth in order
to save time. Registration will be from
7 o'clock this morning and will con-
tinue until 9 o'clock this evening. The
place of registration is at the voting
booth in each ward.
:,000,000 Pets Cause Worry in Britain
London, June 4.-Threatened with a
national food shortage, England is
nursing at its bosom a dangerous ad-
der in the form of 3,000,000 canine pets
who are doing their daily bit to de-
plete the nation's supply of food.
President Hutchins at Ohio State U.
President Harry B. Hutchins has
gone to Ohio State university, Colum-
bus Ohio, where he will give the com-
mencement address today.

*:
F

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HERE'S THE ADDRESS OF
NAVAL MILITIA-WRITE !
TIe address of the Michigan
companies of naval militia is Co.
J, Camp Paul Jones, Great Lakes,
Ill. The men write that they are
anxious to get more letters.
* * * * *' * * * * * -* * * *

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