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May 30, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-30

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THE WEATHER
SHOWERS TODAY OR
TONIGHT

I

Ab V
or ifNr a

jIat 3j

UNITED PRESS

DAY AND \IGHf
IRHE SERVICE

p

VOL. XXVII. No. 172. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN'h

CITIZENS OF ANN
AHOR TO GATHER
IN HONOR OF DEAD
COMPANY I AND WAR VETERANS
TO JOIN IN MEMORIAL
PARADE
WILL HOLD SERVICES
IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Literary and Engineering Companies
to Meet at 1:30
O'clock
Today Ann Arbor pauses for a brief
moment during the hubbub of the busi-
ness world to pay her respects to the
deceased heroes of the Civil war.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

WATERBURY TO EDIT
1917 - 1918 INLANDER

John E. Campbell, '18,
Business Manager
licatlon

Appointed as
of Pub-

PROGRAM'0F TODAY'S
EXERCISES
9:30 o'clock-G. A. R. veterans
will decorate graves of fallen
comrades in St. Thomas cem-
etery.
10:30 o'clock-Boy Scouts leave
courthouse to strew flowers at
Forest Hill and Fairview ceme-
teries.
10:45 o'clock-Service for sailor-
soldier dead at Wall street
bridge..
12 noon-Fire salute at courthouse
monument.
1:30 o'clock-Organizations form
on Huron street in front of city
hall for parade.
2:15 o'clock - Public memorial
exercises in Hill auditorium.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

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Promptly at 1:30 o'clock organiza-
tions to march in the Memorial day
parade will form on Huron street in
front of the city hall, and will be as-
signed to their positions. Company I
will head the line of march, followed
in order by the members of the Span-
ish war veterans, Civil war veterans,
city council, and citizens' committee.
The parade will march out Huron
street, down State street to North Uni-
versity avenue, and continue on the
avenue until Hill auditorium is
reached.
Literary Companies to Formt
Literary companies will fall in at
1:30 o'clock on North University av--
enue, between the Hill auditorium and
Waterman gymnasium. The engineer-
ing companies will assemble on North
University avenue near Hill auditor-
ium at 1:30 o'clock. Neither the lit-
erary nor the engineering companies
will march in the parade, but will
march in a body to Hill auditorium
where Memorial exercises will be held.
The law companies will not partici-
pate.
Exercises in Hill Auditorium
Exercises will begin at 2:15 o'clock
in Hill auditorium, opening with the
playing of "The Star Spangled Ban-
ner." Commander Robert Campbell,
Civil war veteran, will preside. The
Rev. Arthur W. Stalker will give the
invocation and benediction. General
Logan's first memorial order will be
read by ex-Mayor William Walsh, fol-
lowing which a brief talk will be given
by President Harry B. Hutchins. Di-
rectly after the president's talk Gus-
tave Sodt will read Lincoln's Gettys-
burg address. During the program an
opportunity will be given the repre-
sentatives of the various patriotic so-
cieties to speak for five minutes on
the progress of their respective organ-
ization. "Tenting on the Old Camp
Ground," "Battle Hymn of the Re-
public," and "The Vacant Chair" will
be sung by Miss Nora Hunt of the
University School of Music. All will
sing "America." The meeting will be
concluded with a salute fired by Com-
pany I of the Michigan national guard.
G. A. I. Veterans to March
G. A. R. veterans will report at the
courthouse at 9:30 o'clock in the
morning, secure flowers and proceed
to the St. Thomas cemetery where they
will decorate the graves of their de-
parted comrades.
Forty boy scouts under the direc-
tion of a Civil war veteran will leave
the courthouse at 10:30 o'clock in
autos to strew flowers at Forest Hill
and Farview cemeteries. A flag will be
placed on each grave.
At 10:45 o'clock a short service to'
(Continued on Page Six.)

Lester E. Waterbury, '17, has been
appointed the managing editor of the
Inlander and John E. Campbell, '18,
the businessmanager, for the year
1917-18, according to Prof. F. N. Scott,
chairman of the board in control of
student publications, yesterday.
Waterbury was one of the associate
editors of the Inlander when it was
first revived in the spring of 1916.
Since then he has been a regular con-
tributor to the magazine. Campbell is
at present an assistant business man-
ager of The Daily.
Factions Prepare
for Deadly Battle
Owing to Strenuous Times, Formalities
Will Be Dispensed
With
Yesterday witnessed a great deple-
tion in the reserve supply of several
kinds of ammunition all around town.
Storekeepers seemed to be unable to
account for the rush until some kind-
ly person stepped forward with the in-
formation that this morning at 9:30
o'clock The Daily will meet the co-
workers of another campus publica-
tion in the annual baseball contest.
Both teams have reached a high de-
gree of efficiency of training (for
them). The crowd present is prom-
ised a home run thrill every inning.
The contest will be held on south
Ferry field under the auspices of
President Glenn M. Coulter of the
Union.
Owing to strenuous war times all
ceremony such as throwing out the
first ball by a governor, a mayor, or
any other high public official will be
dispensed with this year. Patriotic
celebrating will rather be the keynote.
Though not definitely decided upon
last night, peacemalers from the rival
camps hope to have reached a definite
decision for an appropriate sendoff
by this morning. Indications at a late
hour are that some one will start the
auspicious occasion by firing a can-
non, or possibly an imported 14-inch
gun.
This is not certain. It may be some
heavier object better adapted to such
times as the present.
MARRIED MEN WILL NOT BE
EXEMPT FROM CONSCRIPTION
Washington, May 29.-Married men
as a class will not be exempt from
draft in the new national army. It is
probable that married men who are
drafted will be relieved from military
service if they have families depend-
ent upon them, but merely because
they , are married they will not be
exempted.
"The act establishing the selective
draft," General Crowder said tonight,
"authorizes the president to excuse or
discharge from the draft those in a
status with respect to persons depend-
ent upon them for support which ren-
ders their exclusion or discharge ad-
visable. Only those whose dependents
must rely solely on them for support
should claim exemption, and, of course,
all married men between the ages of
21 and 30 inclusive must register."
INTERCOLLEGIATE PATRIOTIC
NIGHT TO BE HELD JUNE 1
Intercollegiate patriotic night, for
the purpose of considering what is be-
ing done towards organizing home
guards as authorized by the legisla-
ture, has been called for the night of
June 1 in Detroit. The meeting will
be held in the board of commerce
building and addressed by General

Harrah and others.
It is stated that the troops are to
be enlisted for the purpose of protect-
ing Detroit and its industrial plants
from mobs and fanatics after regular
troops have left for service.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

COLEGE FURNISH 15011
FORMUACE ORPS
STUDENTS OF 32 UNIVERSITIESI
ASSEMBLED FOR EN.
LISTMENT
Washington, May 29.-The colleges
of the country have furnished 1.5001
picked men for the United States armyI
ambulance corps for service in France.4
The corps are organized in units ofI
36 men each for training near Phila-I
delphia. As soon as possible after
equipment is complete they will sail.
Students of 32 universities and col-
leges are assembled for enlistment.
Contingent organizations to meet the
need for medical service was pointed
out by members of the French com-
mission.
Upon arrival in France the various
ambulance units will be utilized byI
the French government until the ar-
rival of United States troops, and then
be turned over to the military forces
of the- United States. The total num-
ber to be enrolled in this corps is moreI
than 4,000.1
EXPENSES INCREASE
$900,000,000 Is Added to Government'sa
Expenditures
Washington, May 29.-The govern-!
ment's expenditures for the fiscal year1
thus far reached $1,600,000,000 today,
more than $900,000,000 in excess of1
last year's expenditure up to the pres-I
ent date, and a new high record in1
American history.
The chief item of the increase-
$607,500,000-was purchase of the ob-
ligations of foreign government in ex-
change for loans advanced to the al-
lies. The sum does not represent by
approximately $140,000,000 the total
amount authorized in loans. An in-
crease of approximately $245,000,000
in the ordinary disbursements of the
government, chiefly due to military
and naval needs, also is recorded. An-
other item going to swell the grand
total of expenditures was the payment
of $25,000,000 for purchase of the Dan-
ish West Indies.
Ordinary receipts also show an in-
crease of more than one-third com-
pared with last year, the total to date
being $818,000,000. The chief item of
increase is the income tax, payment
so far this year having reached the
total of $155,000,000, as compared with
$28,000,000 last year. Income tax re-
ceipts are flowing into the treasury
at the rate of nearly $4,500,000 a day.
CABINET UNION FAILS
Andrassy Unable to Bring Together
New Hungarian Ministry
Berlin, May 29.- Efforts to form
a coalition cabinet in Hungary have
failed, according to Vienna reports to-
day.
It is understood that Count Andras-
sy had been selected to succeed Count
Pisza in this task of forming the min-
istry, and had met with rebuttals in
attempting to unite all elements into
one cabinet.
The news is taken here to indicate
that Count Andrassy will be forced to
be content with the present state of
affairs, although Vienna dispatches
expressed hope that certain of Pisza's
followers would desert the former
premier.

Toll of Southern Tornado Increases
Memphis, May 29.-Revised reports
today from the sections of Kentucky,
Tennessee, Arkansas, and Alabama
swept by tornadoes Sunday place the
number of dead at 160, and the in-
jured at 550.
Southwestern Kentucky paid the
heaviest toll.
Property damage in Alabama is esti-
mated at $1,000,000. No accurate esti-
mate of the monetary loss in the other
states is available, wire communica-
tions being badly crippled.
County Fire Bells to Aid Conscription
Eugene, Ore., May 29.-The fire bells
of Lane county are to be used in con-
nection with the registration of men
under the selective conscription act
on the date to be proclaimed by Presi-
dent Wilson. It is planned to have the
bells sounded in this way hourly where
possible.

OF LIBERTY LON BONDS
INVENTOR WANTS CITIZENS OF
COUNTRY TO SERVE NATION
IN SOME WAY
Menlo Park, N. J., May 29.-With a
three days' stubble of white beard on
his face and with eyes tired from in-
cessant work for weeks, Thomas A.
Edison was coaxed out of his labora-
tory today, and made a statement urg-
ing his fellow countrymen to buy lib-
erty loan bonds.1
Need Spirit of Service
"The spirit of 1917 in America
should be a spirit of service," he de-
clared. "From the highest to the low-
est the uppermost idea should be how
we can serve our country. Some of
us are going to sacrifice our lives on
battle fields in France and on highj
seas, some of us are working night9
and day to solve scientific questions,
some of us expect to do our bit in farm
work or in factories. There is a place
for all of us if we but look for it with
patriotic eyes.
Pay What Citizenship Is Worth
"Pay what it is worth to you to be
American citizens. Figure it out cold-
blooded if you are built that way. Con-
sider what the country has meant to'
you and what it will mean to your
children and to humanity of the future
generation, and when you have
thought over these things, take your
pen in hand and do your bit for the
liberty loan. To buy a bond is to pay
the first premium on an insurance
policy against militarism, against fu-
ture wars and its horrors."
INLANDER APPEARS
Final Number of Magazine Meets
with Large Sale
Heralded as the most complete is-
sue of the year, the May number of
the Inlander met a ready sale yester-
day. The table of contents is ex-
ceptionally comprehensive and is typ-
ical of the standard which has been
set during the pat year.
The leading articles are both on
the same subject, "The University Next
Year." A woman student sets forth
her belief that the women will have
a great deal to do with the activ-
ities of the campus next year and that
their influence should prove of great
benefit to the men when they return
from the trenches. Her argument ie
met by Frank F. Nesbit, '17-'19L,
who believes that no radical trans-
formation of the University need be
expected.
Among the other contributions are:
"Space and Time," by a woman stu-
dent writing under the pseudnyom of
"Mary Langhorne"; "The Tie That
Bound," a story, by Helen G. Davis,
'17; "St. Martin's," a sketch, by Lucile
H. Quarry, 18; "Footprints and Foam,"
a prose poem by Isabel P. Snelgrove,
grad.; an .article on "The War Class
of '61", and several poems by Mr.
M. C. Wier, of the rhetoric depart-
ment, Mrs. Jane Harris Crane, and
Lester E. Waterbury, '17.
There are a few copies of the mag-
azine still on sale in the bookstores.
Discover Old Fort in Indiana
Gary, Ind., May 29.-An old fort, 450
by 420 feet, has been found in Porter
county, Indiana, five miles southwest
of Gary. The fort is similar to the
earthworks now used to fortify the

permanent camps back of European
battlefields, but is at least 150 years
old. Blockhouses at the four corners,
four foot embankments with perpen-
dicular, drained trenches on the inside,
form the chief features.
Dean Bates Goes to New York City
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school is in New York City attending
a committee meeting of the section of
legal education of the American Bar
association. The committee is arrang-
ing a program for the session of the
American Bar association to be held
next August.
Russia Orders Locomotives in U. S.
New York, May 29.-Russia has.
placed an order with American manu-
facturers for 500 locomotives to cost
approximately $25,000,000 and 19,000
cars at $15,000,000, it was reported in
financial circles today.

SEVERAL VACANCIES REMAIN
BE FILLED; APPOINT,
SERGEANT

TOI

Temporary organization of the third
government ambulance unit to be
known as C unit, was completed last!
night at a meeting of the intelligence
bureau committee in charge of this
work. A number of vacancies remain
to be filled in this unit.,
Another step in the permanent or-
ganization of the first and second units
to be known as A and B units was
taken, but they are not considered as
final yet.£
C. F. Weaver, '19E, was appointed
temporary sergeant of C unit and E.1
G. Dorfner, '19L was chosen as one
of the corporals. Following is the listI
of the men who were placed in this
unit: E. M. Carroll, grad.; Shirley
Galen, '17L; V. L. Watts, '19; L. J.
Curby, '17L; C. V. Sellers, '17; A. F.
Paley, '18L; T. B. Oglethorpe, '17;
C. A. Brown, '17E; W. K. Nieman, '17;
P W. Steelsmith, '19E; G. F. Wales,
'19L; o. M. Rathbert, '19A; Leigh
Hoadley, '19; W. S. Kammerer, '18.;
W. A. Stevenson, '17; H. C. Otis, '17;
R. M. Lewis, '19L; J. E. Simmons, '17;
F. B. Lyon, '19; E. R. Speer, '20; F.
M. Reed, '20E; L. A. Sappo, L. H.
Haskins, '19; G. E. Geekin, A'. M. Mc-
Connell, and L. B. Dimond, '16. The
initials of Gallop and Sprague are not
known.
The executive committee in charge
of this work is as follows: Dr. James
F. Breakey, Dr..Howard H. Cummings,
Prof. Joseph A. Bursley, Homer Heath,
Prof. Walter T. Fishleigh, and Francis
R. Bacon.
WILL MORGENTHAU BECOME U.
S. AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN
Washington, May 29.-Henry Mor-
genthau, rumored as newly appointed
ambassador to Japan to succeed the
late Ambassador Guthrie of Pittsburg,
was unconcerned at widely circulated
reports here today, following a long
conference Morgenthau had with the
president last night. Morgantham was
formerly ambassador to -Turkey.
ENGINEERS AND FORESTERS
TO TAKE FIRST. AD EXAMS
All engineers and foresters who are
taking first aid work under Dr. C. B.
Stouffer will take their examinations
for Red Cross certificates on Friday
from 4 to 6 o'clock or on Saturday
from 10 to 12 o'clock at the Homoeo-
pathic hospital.
Golf Club to Hold Tourney Today
The members of the Ann Arbor
Golf club will hold a tourney at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon. A prize of
two balls will be given for the lowest
score for 18 holes. Two other prizes
of two balls each will also be given
to the players who are ninth and
twenty-fifth in rank at the end of the
tourney.
Cosmopolitan Club Postpones "Roast"
The Cosmopolitan club "roast"
which- is announced on another page
of this issue to be held this after,
noon, was postponed at a late hour
last night.

REGATTA ATTRACTS
MANY CONTESTANTS
Entry Cards Miay be Secured From
Officials; Several Have
Signed Up
According to reports from the places
of entry this year's regatta, which is to
be held Saturday,isalready attracting
wide-spread interest among the stu-
dents of the University. A consider-
able number of men signed up for the
different events yesterday afternoon
soon after the cards were made out.
All students who intend to enter any
of the contests are strongly urged to
do so as soon as possible. Cards for
this purpose may be secured from the
following committeemen: Waldo Mc-
Kee, '18E; N. J. Brazell, '18E; B. W.
Malfroid, 'ISM; A. L. Kirkpatrick, '18;
Luther Beach, '18E; Robert Patterson,
'18; H. A. Knowlson, '18E; K. L.
Wehmeyer, '18, and L. A. Glover, '18,
Entry lists have been placed in the
following places: Huston's, the Un-
ion, the boathouse, Ferry field club
house, and the registrar's office.
COMMITTEE ORGANIZES
THIRD AMBLNEUNIT

GERMAN SCHEMES
IN SOUTH AMERICA
ISOH9EXPOSEDBY U. S.
PLOTS GROW SERIOUS IN ARGEN-
TINA, VENEZUELA AND
COLOMBIA
PLOTS CONDUCTED BY
CABLE FROM BERLIN
Brazil Prepared to Declare War on
Germaniy; Chile Repulses'
Teuton Influences
Washington, May 29.--A campaign
by German propagandists to allign
South and Central American countries
against the United States was exposed
by the state department today.
In three South American republics
--Argentina, Venezuela, and Colombia
--the propaganda has assumed menac-
ing proportions.
In Brazil activities of propagandists
have proveda boomerang culminating
in the chamber of deputies voting
overwhelmingly to revoke the declara-
tion of neutrality for the declaration
of war on Germany by Brazil.
Argentina has become a hotbed of
pro-German and anti-American propa-
ganda, according to the information.
'Ihe aim of these propagandists brand-
ed by the state departmentais an effort
to create an irritation against this
country.
Plots Handled by Cable
There is evidence that the propa-
ganda has been conducted directly
from Berlin by use of the cable from
Spain to Buenos Aires. The govern-
ment of Argentina had no part in en-
couraging this propaganda, it was
stated.
German firms in Argentina have
been the agents of the Berlin govern-
ment in stirring up anti-American
feeling in that country, it was official-
ly declared.
May Be Clue to Destroyer News
No official would say that this cable
provided the means by which the news
of the departure of American de-
stroyers reached Berlin in time to
permit mining the port before their
arrival. but it was accepted as a clue
to the leak.
An inquiry, by the United States, of
the Argentine government to learn the
facts concerning the reported embargo
on shipment of Argentine wheat to the
allies was distorted by these propa-
gand4sts into an attempt by the United
States to dictate Argentine policies, it
was declared.
Feeling Strong in Columbia
In Colombia, the anti-American feel-
ing that has existed since the separa-
tion of Panema has been fanned great-
ly by the pro-Germans. A constant
effort has been made by the kaiser's
agents since the United States dec-
1 aration c°war to keep the Colombians
stirred up.
In Venezuela, the program has been
to revive the bitter feeling that existed
in the days of Castro's power. As in
Colombia the efforts have been exerted
not at the government but at the peo-
pne.
Chle has repulsed these German in-
fluencs. Indications now point to her.
e. .nen_ into the war with Brazil
against Germany. It is expected this
step will have a sobering influence
upon the other South American coun-
tries.
Be!iev +panisl Ships Aid Germans

Buenos Aires, May 29.-Belief that
Spanish ships clearing from Buenos
Aires have acted as supply bases for
submarines raiding allied commerce
off the Spanish coast, was increased
this afternoon by numerous'dispatches.
The Spanish steamer Leo XIII is
reported to have been taken to Likar
by the British recently and forced to
unload explosives and submarine air
apparatus.
Violent Storm Holds Train Stationary
Charleston, Ill., May 29.-The Char-
leston Courier prints the following:
"The force of the wind is indicated
in the experience of a Big Four south-
western limited, westbound, which en-
countered the storm between Charles-.
ton and Mattoon. So terrific was the
velocity of the wind that the train
remained stationary for. a while, al-
though the engineer had the throttle
open."

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Due to the fact that today is a
national holiday the registrar's
office will be closed all day.
Registration for military service
will be resumed tomorrow.

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