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October 18, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-18

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THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
FAIR AND
WARMER

tars-
OP . JL t
z
IGAN

UNITED PRESS' WIRI
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
~THE ONLY MORNING PAPER UY
ANN ARBOR

I

J

.

VOL XXVII. No. 14. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1916. PRICE FIVE CEN

I.F1 HANLY, DRY
CAND9IDTE, TALKS
FROM TRA1ISTEPS
CALLS LIQUOR QUESTION THE
GREATEST ISSUE IN
50 YEARS
LANDRITH ALSO MAKES SPEECH

Prohibition Special on Way From
troit to Jackson Where Big,
Rally Is Scheduled

De-

J. Frank Hanly, candidate for presi-
dent on the Prohibition ticket, ad-
dressed several hundred people yes-
terday morning at the Michigan Cen-
tral depot. He spoke from the plat-
form of the, Prohibition special train
which came to Ann Arbor from De-
troit.
"The liquor problem cannot be set-
tled as long as a single saloon is pro-
tected by the government," said Mr.
Hanly. "It is the greatest issue pres-
ented to the American public in over
half a century, tle greatest issue for
consideration from a social welfare
standpoint, the greatest issue consid-
ered from a civic standpoint, the great-
est issue considered from an economic
standpoint.
"The amount spent for alcoholic
drink in a single year is enough to de-
fray the expenses of administering our
government during the last year which
has been one of the most expensive in
our history."
Ira Landrith, of Nashville, Tenn.,
candidate for vice president on the
Prohibition ticket, also made an ad-
dress. The special left Ann Arbor for
Jackson where a big mass meeting was
scheduled.
Some difficulty was occasioned' the
speakers in giving their address be-
cause of the arrival and departure of
local trains which caused several in-
terruptions.
HARRISON HEARS 200
SING INFIPVH TRYOUT
Director of Glee Club Busy Trying to
Pick Members for
Year
Two hundred voices were heard yes-
terday afternoon by Theodore Harri-
son, director of the Glee club, in an
effort to pick'the members of the club
for this year. This is the fifth try-
out held to fill places in the club, and
one 'more will be held in the next
few days. After that the definite list
of members will be announced.
Last year's very successful trip to
the coast is responsible for bringing
out many more candidates than ever
before. This year's trip will be fully
as great a reward for those who make
the club. It will be taken through
the southwest, as far as Arizona. The
complete route will be announced
later.
[UGNES SPEAKS IN MITCHELL
Addresses Audience of 2,000 in South
Dakota Campaign
(By Perry Arnold, United Press Staff
Correspondent.)
Mitchell, S. D., Oct. 17.-Speaking
before a farmer audience of 2,000,
Nominee Hughes today analyzed in
terms of sharp criticism the Demo-
cratic platform's pledge as to the tariff
and solemnly warned his auditors that
the present plan of great appropria-
tions and dereasing of the revenue
through import duties "could not go
on indefinitely as though there was an
inexhaustible supply of money."
Hughes produced figures to show
that in 1913 under the Payne bill the
total of imports was $1,813,000,000
against $2,197,000,000 In 1916 under the
Underwood bill. Notwithstanding this'
vast increase he declared the actual

revenue to the government in duties
on these articles was only $212,000,000
in 1916 as against $319,000,000 under
the Republican protective tariff.

I wo Senior Classes
Nominate Officers
Two senior classes made their
nominations for class officers yester-
day. "Those nominated by the liter-
ary class are: President, Ralph M.
Carson and H. Gray Muzzy; vice
president, Della C. Laubengayer and
Gladys L. Whelan; secretary, Alice
J. Blodgett, Irma H. Giddings, and
Margaret R. Long; treasurer, Harry
Carlson and John W. Langs; football
manager, Theodore S. Cox and
Francis L. Hopkinson; track man-
ager, R. Harry Leslie and Harold E.
OBrien; basketball manager, Stan-
ley P. Smith and Cyril Talbot; ora-
torical delegate, C. Vernon Sellers,
Rollin C. Hunter, and Milburn R.
Palin; baseball manager, Milton S.
Trost and Leonard W. Nieter.
Senior laws noninated the follow-
ing: President, Donald Sarbaugh and
Ferris Fitch; vice president, Kenneth
Barnard, G. C. Claassen;asecretary,
R. H. Gleason and R. F. Gates; treas-
urer, John E. Sanders and M. C. Ma-
son; sergeant-at-arms, J. P. Sturges
and J. L. Beers; football manager,
Barnard Pierce and L. S. Moll; base-
ball manager, William Achi and A.
A. Matson; basketball manager,
Glenn Howland and C. A. Lokker;
track manager, Harrison L. McCarthy
and H. R. Hewitt; oratorical delegate,'
Shelby G. Ogden and P. A. Miller.
The senior lit election will be held
in the corridor of the general library
from 2 to 6 o'clock Thursday after-'
noon. Senior laws will elect from 9
to 12 o'clock Thursday morning in
the law building.-
Church Delegate
Exhibits Wrath
Brother of Ambassador Page Wants
No Omission of Prayer
for President
St. Louis, Oct. 17.-I) eep indigna-
tion was expressed today by Roswell
Page, lay delegate in the house ofi
deputies of general convention of the
Protestant Episcopal church, at a rec-
ommendation that the words "in
health and in prosperity, long to live"
be left out of the prayer for the presi-]
dent of the United States.
"I would not vote at all on a prayer
that did not wish the chief executive
long life and good health," Page as-
serted emphatically. He is a brother4
of Ambassador Page of London. A
$5,000,000 fund is being raised to be
used as a retirement fund for every
superannuated Episcopal divine.
London, Oct. 17.-Only 8,805 Irish.
men have enlisted in the British army
since the Dublin rebellion, Lord Derby
declared in the house of lords this aft-
noon, in a final appeal for voluntary
recruits from Ireland.
St. Louis, Oct. 17.-Noel L. Robyn,
58 years old, insurance broker, ended
his life here today by leaping from
the .leventh* floor of the Title Trust
building to the street. He was a broth-
er of Alfred G. Robyn, American com-
poser and organist, living in New York.
Friends could assign no reason.
Chicago, Oct. 17--Wheat sold on the
Chicago grain market today on a big
export business and bad crop reports
from Russia, England and Argentine.
December wheat closed up 51-4 to
1631-2, while May wheat advanced
61-4 to 1641-2.
New York,'Oct. 17.-Cotton prices

jumped to record heights on the cot-
ton exchange this afternoon, adding
more than 30 points to the 30-point
rise of yesterday and selling well above
18 cents a pound. July cotton sold at
17.39 cents, a gain of 35 points.
New York, Oct. 17.-Four attacks on
the street cars of the New York'Rail-
ways company were made today by
strike sympathisers. In each case the
cars were badly smashed. One pas-
senger was badly injured and several
were hurt. 'he fact that police have
been removed from stations on the sur-
face cars made the attack of the riot,
ers comparatively easy.
Mobile, Ala., Oct. 17.-Shipping of
all kinds, including more than 100
fishing smacks, hurried back to Gulf
ports today because of reports of a
dangerous storm heading northward.
There was great fear for many big
freighters Europe bound.

FERRIS SAYS HE
WANTS WOMEN TO
HAVE THE BALLOT
MAKES STATEMENT IN ADRRESS
BEFORE D. A R. LAST
NIGHT
SAYS THEY WILL GET SUFFRAGE
Regent Beal, Mayor Wurster and
Others Also Address Con-
ference
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris,
speaking at the conference of the
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion held in the Sarah Caswell Angell
hall last night, stated that he wanted
women to have the "right kind of
suffrage."
In his talk, Governor Ferris men-
tioned some bits of interesting in-
formation and*statistics about the D.
A. R. and in coming to the subject
of the members, he said in connec-
tion with suffrage, "You women will
get all you ask for, and I am fear-
ful that you may get more. I want
you to have the right kind of suffrage
and have it now so that you can
get busy about something very worth
while." The governor expressed a
wish that the society might have a
great deal to do with making "it pos-
sible for the, foreign born of this state
to learn the English language."
Other speakers on the program last
evening were: Regent Junius E. Beal,
Mayor Ernest M. Wurster, and State
Regents of the Daughters of the
American Revolution Mrs. John P.
Hpme of Wisconsin, Mrs. Fred H. H.
Calhoun of South Carolina, and Mrs.
Charles E. Longley of Rhode Island.
The state regent of the Michigan
chapter, Mrs. William H. Wait, of
Ann Arbor, presided over the confer-
ence.
After the conference, a reception
was held in honor of Governor Ferris
in Barbour gymnasium. Interesting
exhibits by the boys of the Starr
Commonwealth were shown there.
Today is visitors' day and all are
cordially invited to inspect the ex-
hibits.
The day's program includes lec-
tures on conservation, camp life,
rural life, and education of children.
A luncheon is to be held at the
dining room of Barbour gymnasium
at 12:30 o'clock, and an informal tea
is to be given the conference by the
residents and governors of Martha'
Cook building at 4:30 o'clock.
WOMANANDSON FOUND
DEAD IN DETROIT HOTEL
Body of 5-Year-Old Boy Held Close in
Arms of Mother; Note Found
in Valise
Detroit, Oct. 17.-With the body of
her 5-year-old son clasped in her arms,
Bessie Adams, 30 years old, was found
dead this afternoon in the room of a
local hotel with a bullet in her heart.
She had first shot and killed her son
and then turned the gun upon herself.
The woman and child came to the
hotel Monday afternoon and nothing
had been heard of them up to Tuesday
noon, when a maid knocked for ad-
mission. Receiving no answer she
called assistants and the bodies were
found after the door had been forced.
A note found in a grip in the room

addressed to "my sister Della" said,
"I am taking Harold with me because
I can't bear to have him live crying
for me. People have said such un-
kind things about us and the way we
have to live, that I cannot bear to live
any longer."
INDEPENDENT CLUB MEETS
Girls' Organization Begins Second
Year; Officers Elected
The Girls' Independent club began
its second year at an enthusiastic
meeting at Adams house last night.
In spite of the storm, a large number
were present and the following of-
ficers were elected:
President-Evelyn Moore, '17.
Treasurer-Jess Saunders, '18.
Secretar--Helen Davis, '19.
Plans were also made for a- joint
social meeting early in November.

Reeves Dislikes Visits of U- VJoats
That the statement of Jean Harbette, the French writer, who said
that the presence of the German submarine U-53 in American waters
was in direct violation of the Monroe Doctrine is not to be taken seri-
ously is the opinion of Prof. J. S Reeves, of the department of political
science. "No construction that I have ever heard put upon the Monroe
Doctrine would bear out this statement," said Professor Reeves in a
statement made last night for The Daily.
The presence of submarines off the coasts of the United States is
not to be welcomed, however, according to Professor Reeves, and it is
a grave question whether they should ever have been allowed to enter
our waters. Their peculiar construction and ability to conceal them-
selves makes it very easy for them to abuse the rights included in the
so-called doctrine of innocent passage."
Submarines can lie within the territorial, waters of the United States
and make them a base of operations "without the knowledge of our gov-
ernment, and for this reason Professor Reeves thinks that the adminis-
tration might have done well to have prohibited the entrance of all sub-
marines into American ports. This would have applied to the Deutsch-
land as well as to the U-53. This-might have been done without in any
way amending the present'body of international law.

ON HINDEN8URG
DRiVE IN 'EASTEI
WAR THEATER 0
GERMANS OPEN ATTACK ALO]
60-MILE FRONT ON
ROUMANIANS

FRESH GATHER' PEP
FOR RUSHTON IGHT
Seniors to Explain Rules of Fall
Games, Enthuse and Enter-
tain Yearlings
SOPHS MEET TOMORROW NIGHT
In preparation for the, annual low-
er class contests to be held Satur-
day morning, two big mass meetings
for the freshmen and -sophomores
have been arranged. These meetings
will afford an opportunity for secur-
ing greater class unity, arousing an
abundance of pep, and making the
underclassmen acquainted with the
rules of the games. Captains and
lieutenants for the rush will also be
elected.
At 7 o'clock tonight in the natural
science lecture room, the yearlings
will gather en masse to listen to the
following speakers: H. A. Taylor,
'17E; H. L. Carroll, '17E; Harold
Fitzgerald, '17; Edward Mack, '17,
and Grant Cook, '17L. Taylor, a stu-
dent councilman, will start out the
meeting with an effort to stir up en-
thusiasm for the contests, after
which Carroll, Varsity track captain,
and Fitzgerald, Michigan Daily sport-
ing editor, will entertain the year-
lings with incidents of former con-
tests, also contributing their share
toward enthusing the freshmen.
Mack, editor of the athletic program,
and Grant Cook, president of the stu-
dent council, will tell the freshmen
about the rules of the games.
At the sophomore meeting, which
will be held at 7 o'clock tomorrow
night in west physics lecture room,
Edwin Palmer, '17, will act as chair-
man, with the following speakers:
Earl Pinney, '16; H. E. O'Brien, '17;
Robert Collins, '17E, and Grant
Cook, '17L.
GREEK CRISIS SEEMS NEAR
French Soldiers Occupy Municipal
Theater; Support Police
London, Oct. 17.-Happenings in
Athens during the past few days in-
timate that a serious crisis is ap-
proaching in Greece.
French sailors have occupied the
municipal theater and have prepared
for instant action by planting ma-
chine and field guns. An earlier report
from the. Greek capital said that1
French marines had landed at Piraeus
and were re-enforcing the police to
prevent "threatened trouble." Three
Greek battleships were seized by the
allied troops.
JUNIOR ITS NOMINATE TODAY
Class Meeting to be Held in Room 101
Economics Building at 4 O'clock
The junior literary class will nom-
inate its class officers for 1916-17 at
4 o'clock this afternoon in room 101
economics building. The officers to be
nominated are: president, vice-presi-
dent, secretary, treasurer, football
manager, baseball manager, and
basketball manager, and oratorical
delegate. Verne Burnett, '16, of the
student council will be present to di-
rect the nominations.

I.

START FIGHTINGIN

SEVEN DADsTO
MISSINGINBLAE,
Fire in Oakes Chemical Company, New
York City, Proves Fatal to
Five Women<
FIREMEN BATTLE THREE HOURSz
New York, Oct. 17.-Seven personst
were burned to death and two arei
missing in a fire which this afternoon{
destroyed the chemical plant of the
Oakes Chemical company and spread
to adjoining property, according to re-t
ports to the police early this evening.t
Of the seven bodies recovered later in
the afternoon, five were women.
After firemen had fought for three
hours against chemical fumes and
flames trying to reach the business
offices which were in the center ofl
the building; they brought out four
bodies. Police who made a canvassf
of the situation said they feared still
other bodies would be found. The re-
covered bodies were burned beyondz
recognition. Nine persons were said to4
have been in the offices and entrappedt
by the flames.,
These included the treasurer of thet
company, H. C. Cook, and his assistant,t
Frederick Christman. The others miss-t
ing are girl stenographers and clerks.I
The fire which spread to the Astoria
veneer works, destroyed much valuable
lumber and several boat houses and
a dock.
CHRGE UNITED STTS
DESTROYERSBREAKLAW
House of Lords Considers Action of
Boats in Recent U-Boat maids
Serioust
London, Oct. 17.-Charges that
United States destroyers violated the'
laws of neutrality when they stood by
and watched the U-53 sing British
merchantmen were made in the house,
of lords this afternoon. Lord Beres-
fore declared, that the appearance of
the destroyers on the scene made it
appear they were present in accord-
ance with a previous arrangement.
Presumably-he referred to a news-
paper suggestion that the U-53 com-
mander might have asked the United
States naval authorities at Newport to
send out the destroyers, when he paid
a call a few hours before the rail. Vis-
count Grey declared that the issue
raised by the presence of the United
States destroyers was a most impor-
tant one. His government, he said,
would withhold representations until it
had gathered information regarding,
the statement that the destroyers
facilitated the operations of the U-
boat, by getting out of the way.
PRESIDENT EMBARKS ON CAM-
PAIGN TRIP TO CHICAGO
Long Branch, N. J., Oct. 17.-Leav-
ing at 11 o'clock this morning, Presi-
dent Wilson started his trip to Chicago
during which, in addition to deliver-
ing three addresses there, he will be
brought in touch with voters in 26
cities and towns through 'brief stops.
The president will be in New York
for about one-half hour Wednesday.

British and French Announce Gains on
Somme Front; Teuton
Trenches Taken
London, Oct. 17.-Von Hindenburg's
widely heralded eastern front offensive
apparently is under way. Teutonic
forces are attacking fiercely on a 60-
mile front along the northwest Ron-
manian frontier. At the same time
they have opened heavy assaults
against the Russian lines north of the
Carpathians.
The Teutons have pushed down the
Trotus valley to the town of Agas,
where they are engaged in battle with
the Roumanians. Berlin dispatches
yesterday reported that the Germans
had broken through Dynes pass lead-
ing into the Trotus valley and were
driving eastward toward the main
railroad supplying the northern Rou-
manian armies.
The Russian war office, however, an-
nounces the repulse of all Teutonic at-
tacks near Dorna Vatra. It is in this
region that von Hindenburg is deliv-
ering his hardest blows, apparently
planning to drive a wedge between the
Russian and Roumanian armies. The
Austro-German attacks north of the
Carpathians apparently are to prevent
the shifting of Russias troops south-
ward to meet the new attack.
Fighting Resumed in Dobrudja.
In Dobrudja fighting has been re-
sumed between the Russo-Roumanans
and the German-Bulgarian armies all
along the front. Anglo-French forces
have extended their gains in the last
24 'hours of fighting on the Somme
front.
The French announce the capture of
another group of houses at the cross
roads village of Sailly-Saillisel where
sharp fighting has been going on for
two days. The British pushed out
north of the Ancre brook last night
for the first time since the opening
day of the Somme offensive, and pene-
trated German trenches. On the
Macedonian front the situation gen-
erally is unchanged. The Bulgarians
counter attacked violently southeast of .
Monastir but were ,repulsed by the
Serbs.
Berlin Reports Successes
Berlin, Oct. 17.-Repulse of British
attacks near Guedecourt and French
attacks near Sally and Fresnes were
reported by the war office today. South
of the Somme the fighting is continu-
ing. The Roumanians are stubbornly
resisting at the roads leading through
the mountain passes. South of Dorna
Vatra the Teutons have captured
heights. On the Russian front the
Slavs continue their violent storming
attacks on several sectors.
NO AID FOR POLES FROM U.S.
President Wilson Refuses on Grounds
of no Agreement
Shadow Lawn, N. J., Oct. 17.-Po-
land's suffering population will not be
aided by the United States because
"important differences still exist be-
tween the allied and central powers"
as to the terms under which- supplies
may be sent to the destitute nation,
President Wilson today announced.
He has "not yet been successful in
inducing the powers to conclude a
definite agreement," he said. Some .
weeks ago the President wrote a let-
ter to the rulers of England, France,
Germany, Russia and Austria urging
their co-operation in relieving the
suffering of the Polish people. His
statement today admitted his efforts
were unsuccessful.
Totem Club to Hold Annual Banquet
Totem club members will hold their

annual banquet for the freshmen of
Eastern high school of Detroit at the
Union at 6 o'clock tonight. Ernest
Wunsch, '17, will act as toastmaster.
Talks will be given by Walter Ger'nt,
'17E, and Henry Massnick, '18, and the
response for the freshmen will be
made by Norman Gable, '20.

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