100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 26, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND PROB-
ABLY RAIN TODAY

Ir flwtritan

D'aiti

UNITED PRESS
DAY AD NI]CHT
WIRE SERV'ICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 169.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1917.

PRICE FIVE CEl\

- t

ITALIANS SWEEP
FORWARD AGINST
HEAV D
TROOPS SCORE BRILLIANT VIC-
TORY IN OFFENSIVE
DRIVE
EFFECTIVE AID GIVEN
BY BRITISH ARTILLERY

Austrian Rear Positions Shelled
Aviators and English Mon-
itors

by

By JohnA H. Hurley
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Rome, May 25.-Another sweep for-
ward across tracks and, in some
places, rocks literally blasted away by
the storm of artillery fire won Italian
troops new and wide gains today. Dis-
patches from the front today empha-
sized the brilliancy of the victories.
The troops won against the splend-
idly organized Austrian forces and the
underground systems of trenches
which mere marvelously constructed.
Vast caverns had been hollowed out
in many places, permitting Austrian
reserves to remain in concealment in
perfect safety from the flight of pro-
jectiles above, until it was necessary
that they pour out to the front lines.
Win Against Big Odds
Considering the nature of the fight-
- ing and the tremendous odds against
the attacking forces, observers of the
Italian successes declare that the ad-
vances so far are almost incredible.
The closest co-operation between Ital-
ian and British artillery is reported.,
The British deadliness of aim has
contributed in no small degree to the
Italian success.
Prepare for Counter Attack
The Italians appeared to be stop-'
ping their offensive long enough to
consolidate all gains, in expectation of
a violent :counter-attack. Italian of-
fensives today had carried General
Cadorna's troops over the strongly
fortified hills, and extended their pos-
itions as far as the outskirts of Versic,{
according to official statements.
Austrian Rear Lines Shelled
Rome, May 25. - British monitors
heavily shelled the Austrian rear pos-
ition in the gulf of Priest early Thurs-
day; morning, according to dispatches
received today. The British craft went
into action at dawn with a fleet of
Italian aviators co-operating. Import-
ant depots in the Austrian rear were
destroyed.
BOARD MEN CHOSEN
New Officers Will Assume Duties at
Beginning of Next Semester
In an election marked by close bal-
loting Glenn Coulter, '18L; Waldo M.
McKee, '1SE, and Howard S. Taylor,
'17E, were chosen members of the
board in control of student publica-
tions yesterday afternoon.
These men will assume their new
duties at the beginning of the next
college year. They will replace Donald
A, Smith, '17E; Lamar M. Kishlar,
'17E, and Harry G. Gault, '17L, stu-
dent members of this year's board.
A total of 1,073 votes were cast.
Coulter received 229; McKee, 180, and
Taylor, 139.
NEW LIBRARY TO OPEN SOON;
PRELIMINARY MOVING DONE
Final preparations for moving into
the reading rooms of the new Library
are now being made. All counters,
books, and furniture which may be
removed without inconvenience to the
students, have been taken out of the
old building, and it is expected that
the moving will be accomplished in
one day.
On th day of moving, notices will
be d0splayed giving directions to stu-
dents, so that they will be able to
find their way around the new build-
ing.
Germany in Touch with War Moves
Washington, May 25.-Information
that the American destroyer fleet was
enroute abroad was in possession of
Berlin officials four days ahead of its
arrival on the other side. The assump-

tion is that destroyers or vessels of
the allies saw to it that mines were
swept aside, inasmuch as the men of
the American craft came to no harm.I

NEW AMBULANCE
UNIT TO BE FORMED
Men Who Have Failed to Make Other
Corps Are Urged to Apply
for This One
Registration for a third government
ambulance unit to be formed here will
begin immediately at the Michigan
Union.
All students who wish to apply for
this unit are urged to register as soon
as possible. Men who failed to make
either of the other two units are still
eligible for this one, which will be
formed in the next few days. The
personnel of the two units which were
formed Thursday night is not definite
and is subject to change whenever the
officers see fit.
A government officer is expected to
arrive here within a few days to take
charge of the preliminary training of
the men. Instructions in driving and
drill will be given to the drivers,
while those who are to act as cooks
will be given pointers in the culinary
science.
LU1KE NORTH, SINGLE
TAXER5, TALKS JUNE 4
ADDRESS WILL BE GIVEN IN LANE
HALL; OPEN TO PUB-
LIC
Luke North, poet, editor, orator, and
noted single tax advocater from the
state of California, has been secured
to speak on .the single tax question in
Ann Arbor on June 4. He is expected
to arrive in the city on June 2.
Mr. North has become publicly
known in the past few years due to
his great campaign for the adoption
of single tax in the state of California.
It is said that he has already more
than 260,000 supporters of the move-
ment in that state alone. He is the
editor of Everyman, a magazine de-
voted to discussions on the single tax
problem.
The lecture which will be given in
Lane hall will be free to the public.
Other announcements will be made
later.
HOUSEWIVES CAN
HELP TO WIN WAR
Dr. Wolman Suggests That House
Economics Be Taught to Pre-
vent Food Losses
"America entered this war to end
it as quickly as possible, and the
housewives of this country can do
much to help bring this about," said
Dr. Leo Wolman of the economics de-
partment yesterday afternoon in the
circuit court rooms, speaking on
"Food Conservation." He spoke un-
der the auspices of the Women's
League for Service.
"There have been two chief sources
of waste," said Dr. Wolman, "that
caused by too great expenditures in
comparison with the weekly wage
earned and that caused by injudicious
buying of foodstuffs." To correct this
evil, Dr. Wolman suggesfed that
groups be organized to instruct in
household economics.
MEN CHOSEN FOR FIRST TWO
AMBULANCE UNITS MEET TODAY
All of the men who have been
chosen for the first two ambulance
units will meet at 10 o'clock today in
front of the Union for drill.

A meeting was held yesterday after-
noon and the men were instructed by
their officers not to leave the Uni-
versity at any time without their pre-
mission. Squad corporals and tem-
porary clerks were appointed by the
sergeants. The officers also conducted
an inquiry for the purpose of deter-
mining likely cooks and mechanics.
Engineers- to Take Red Cross Exam
Only those who have taken the first
aid course given in the engineering
department are eligible to take the
Red Cross examination which will be
given from 10 to 12 o'clock this morn-
ing in the lower lecture room of the
Homoeopathic hospital.
Those who have taken the first aid
course given under the direction of
Dr. H. H. Cummings of the University
health service will take the examina-
tion given some time next week. The
exact place and time will be announced
later.

BLAME ALLIES FOR
HIGH WHEAT COST
Senators Gore and Reed Hold Large
Purchases of Allied Powers
Force Up Market
STRONG OPPOSITION IN SENATE
AGAINST FOOD ADMINISTRATOR
Assert Hoover's Utterances Have Bee"
Worth Mllions to 'Bulls of
the Market'
Washington, May 25.- The sudden
purchase by the government from
Portugal of 5,000,000 bushels of wheat
futures, and fear that it might be used
with purchases of the Allies to force
up the market are the main reasons
for the recent stoppage of trading in
certain wheat futures in the Chicago
grain exchange, Senator Gore declar-
ed today in a debate on the Lever food
bill.
Allies Control Market
"Our allies and high prices
to farmers, and speculation are re-
sponsible for the high prices of wheat
and flour," Senator Reed of Missouri,
declared during the debate. Reed said
that the Allies control wheat prices,
buying more than 150,000,000 bushels
in futures and reaping a large profit
for themselves.
Oppose Food Dictatorship
The first general discussion of the
government food control legislation
this afternoon developed strong op-
position in the senate to a food ad-
ministrator. "Whenever the time
comes, said Reed of Missouri, that we
substitute for the law, the will of a
single man, we substitute despotism
for democracy." Reed declared, "of-
ficial utterances by government rep-
resentatives were as much responsible
for high prices as anything else, while
Herbert C. Hoover, new food admin-
istrator, has been worth millions to
'bulls of the market'."
Pass Lever Food Bill Amendment
Washington, May 25.-House repub-
licans forced through the amendment
to the Lever food bill, providing no
one be employed under the terms of
the bill, either with or without com-
pensation, who had been employed by
any corporation that had been con-
victed under the anti-tax laws.
MORE YEAR BOOKS
Another Allotment Will Be Placed on
Sale at 9 O'clock Today
For the benefit of those who have
not yet secured their copies of the
1917 Michiganensiar , another allot-
ment of books will be put on sale at
9 o'clock this morning in the main cor-
ridor of University hall.
Copies of the 1917 issue are going
rapidly and deliveries to students who
have ordered books will not be guar-
anteed after Monday. In case any
copies remain unsold after the Monday
sale, they may be obtained at the Mich-
iganensian office, Press building.
TRAINING CAMP GRADUATES
TO GO BACK TO COLLEGES
Norman, Okla., May 24.-College men
will probably be sent back to their
studies next fall after they complete
the course in training camps, accord-
ing to Mr. A. O. Booth, Oklahoma state
secretary of the Y. M. C. A.
Mr. Booth just returned after at-
tending a meeting of international sec-
retaries at New York and he thinks

that such a course will certainly be
followed if indications can be relied
upon. Educated men are of more use
to their country than uneducated ones
so the government will see that the
officers get as much college work done
as is possible under the circumstances.
Hiram College Students Hold Reunion
A reunion of all former students
from Hiram college who are on the
campus, was held Thursday evening
at the home of Dean W. B. Hinsdale
of the Homoeopathic Medical school,
at 716 Forest avenue.
Among those included were Prof. I.
W. Demmon of the English depart-
ment, Prof. C. S. Berry of the educa-
tion department, and Prof. W. P. Cal-
houn of the economics department.
Oberlin to Have Illumination Night
Oberlin, O., May 25.-An illumina-
tion night will be a feature of Oberlin's
84th commencement.

It's here.
What?
Straw-hat day.
Every hat has its day. Or so it
should be. Yesterday senior caps
crowned the learned brows of our
august upperclassmen. Today these
self-same seniors choose a less ex-
clusive headgear.
From Panama and from Italy, from,

I

1IAHSHTENAVV BANKS TAE
MOST Of COUNTY LOAN
MANY APPLICATIONS FOR BONDS
HAVE ALREADY BEEN MADE
SAY BANKERS
Three-fourths of the $1,000,000 lib-
erty loan allotment for . Washtenaw
county has already been subscribed for
by the banks of the county. The re-
maining sum, the bankers are con-
fident, will be subscribed for by the
citizens at large. .
This assurance was given by repre-
sentatives of 15 banks of the county
at a meeting held at the Catalpa Inn
yesterday noon.
Numerous applications for the bonds
at different banks have already been
made. A committee of bankers was
organized at the meeting to take care
of the bonds and every one in the
county who has a dollar to invest in a
patriotic cause will be given ample
opportunity. George W. Millen of this.
city is chairman of the bankers' com-
mittee.
AVIATION SERICE MEN
NEEDED BY COYERNMENT

IMICHIGAN STUDENTS

Today Sounds

Knell for Derbies

the Philippines and from-Detroit--
comes the woven alfalfa to take the
place of the tasseled caps.
But straw-hat day is not an alto-
gether just institution. While it is
true that the seniors are temporarily
relieved of their sombre-hued chap-
eaus, the verdant freshmen are still
oppressed by that most excellent of
sun shades-the fresh pot. The fresh-
man sees no joy in straw-hat day.

DESIRING

'TO ENTER SHOULD SIGN
UP AT UNION

Any Michigan men desiring to enter
the government aviation service are
requested to sign up at the Union as
soon as possible. Training will begin
within a short time in Detroit wherej
an aviation instruction field is being
put into shape.
To enter the corps the applicant
must have had three years work in a
college or scientific school of good
standing. The physical examination
for this branch of the service is very
rigid. After signing up aul passing
all necessary requirements the ap-
plicant is given training in one of
the schools leading up to an examina-
tion for admittance into the regular
corps. This is the highest paid branch
of the army and there are still many
openings for young men who can pass
the requirements.
PURDUE'S BUREAU LOCATES
GIRLS IN MANY CAPACITIES
Lafayette, Ind., May 25.-The em-
ployment bureau for women students
of Purdue university has secured
many positions for college girls since
its establishment last fall under the
direction of the Y. W. C. A. Several
girls have been placed in homes
where they can earn their room and
board. Others wanting to earn spend-
ing money have been given odd jobs,
such as catering to societies, serving
dinners, taking care of children, and
making charts for instructors.
Next year a mending department
will be added. This department will
be of benefit to the entire college
community as well as the girls them-
selves.
Censorship Clause Agreed Upon
Washington, May 25.-The Gregory
espionage bill with the censorship
clause was agreed to today by house
and senate conferees. The censorship
prohibits the publication of military
news of value to the enemy, but per-
mits full discussion, comment, and
criticism of acts or policies of the
government or its representatives.

BOAT CLUB REGTTA
WILL 8BE HELDJUNE 2
IF WEATHER PERMITS SWIMMI NG
EVENTS WILL PROVE
TO BE FEATURE
Following a petition for the holding
of the annual Boat club regatta, a1
meting of the organization last night
paved the way for a restoration of the
annual Huron festival, the event to
take place on Saturday, June 2.
If weather conditions will not inter-
fere with the plans this year, at a year
ago, the day's boat and swimming
events will be one of the spectacles of
the school year, according to those
in charge of the special features: De-
tails of the features and events will
be announced in a few days and en-
tries can be made following the an-
nouncement.
In addition to the setting of the date
for the, annual regatta, officers were
chosen to fill the places left open by
those students called to the service.
H. A. Knowlson, '18E, who held the
office of vice-commodore, automatical-
ly became commodore and selected the
following men to fill the remaining of-
fices: Vice-commodore, N. J. Brazell,
'18E; secretary, Hugh Brown; treas-
urer, Lynn Glover, '18; first ensign,
J. H. Mooney, '18E; second ensign,
Gordon Avery, '18E; third ensign,
Arthur Ippel, '18.
Student Becomes
ICreel 's' Reporter
Jhn Mosenfeldter, '17, Appointed as
Assistant to Prepare Official
War Bulletin
John A. Mosenfeldter, '17, has been
appointed one of the five reporters
1that will prepare the official govern-
ment war bulletin under the direction
of George Creel.
Mosenfeldter left school some days
ago for Washington, D. C., where he
was to work for the intercollegiate in-
telligence bureau at the suggestion of
the rhetoric faculty.
It was while still acting in this ca-
pacity that he was appointed to his
present reportorial position.
NO DISGRACE TO BE DRAFTED
SAYS COLUMBIA PROFESSOR
Columbus. 0., May 25.-"It should
not be considered a disgrace to be
drafted," Dr. Talcott Williams of Co-
lumbia university told Ohio State stu-
dents yesterday. "Thousands of young
men are 'standing at attention' wait-
ing for orders," he said. "Congress
has decided that the army is to be
raised by conscription, and most
young men will be satisfied to follow
the dictation of the government."
- Dr. Williams stated that about one-
half of the journalism students at Co-
lumbia have been taken away from
school by the war situation. He as-
serted that women who are studying
journalism will hare great oppor-
tunities to fill the places vacated by
men who will go to war.
Conmmencement Festivities Curtailed
Providence, May 25.-Commence-
ment festivities at Brown university
will be curtailed this year, and the
exercises will take on a patriotic air.
Lindley M. Garrison, former secretary
of war, and Prof. Stephen Leacock of
McGil, university will be the principal

speakers.
Princeton Men Make Practice Flights
Princeton, May 25.-Actual work of

GLEE CLUB GIE
FIALCONCERT Of
YEAR LAST NIGH
"VICTORS" AND "VARSITY" CAL
FORTH GREAT RESPONSE
OF ENTHUSIASM
WALDO FELLOWS, '14
IS WELL RECEIVE
Regent Junius E. Real Speaks Betwe
Numbers on Purchase of
Liberty Bonds
Subdued chords of "Laudes atq
Carmina" which prelude a concert
the University of Michigan Glee a:
Mandolin clubs, resounded again la
night from behind the scenes of H
anditorium.
The audience, although not partic
larly large, accorded hearty applau
to every number of the program whi
was a blend of the familiar and t
novel. "Victors" and "Varsity" call
forth the usual enthusiastic responi
but perhaps the glee club did its be
work in the impressive "Lost Chor
with the beautiful organ accompai
ment by Frank A. Taber, '17.
Songs and stunts which explain 1
enviable position among Michigan e
tertainers delighted the followers
Waldo Fellows, '14, and to his colle
tion of favorites, such as "I Got I
Meaning Just the Same," "On the Ro
to Mandalay" and the famous mov
imitation. he added several new a
equally diverting specialties.
Sikes and Davis Appear for Last Thi
The last appearance of two su
well known campus singers as Cha
B. Sikes, '17, and H. L. Davis, ':
held much interest for their heare
and was entirely consistent with for:
er successes. Two violin solos d
Robert Berman, '19, were render
with feeling and finish.
A serenade quintette played se
eral popular airs in the best sub-b,
cony manner and the banjorine pE
formers sent waves of ragtime cras
ing up to the flag overhead, while t
f long-eared quadruped with the detE
mined disposition was a great pet
the glee club, being celebrated in t)
selections "Go 'Long Mule, Go 'Lon
and "The Burro."
Regent Junius E. Beal Speaks on Lo
Regent Junius E. Beal spoke 1
tween numbers on the duty and pr
ilege of giving aid ,o the governme
through the purchase of liberty bon
The audience assisted in the singi
of the national anthem at the close
the program.

HOLD SENIOR

SIN

Small Crowd Gathers Around Band
stand at Set Hour
Spectators who chanced to be nea
the campus bandstand when the clock
struck seven last evening, saw a doze:
members of the band, several towns
people, and three seniors, assemble
for the open air concert. A few min-
utes later the scene had taken on
different aspect. The crowd increase
steadily, and when the band began th
"Whistling Caprice" which proved th
most popular piece on the last Ban
Bounce program, the tune was wristle
and hummed by an enthusiastic audi
ence.
College Students Beat Army in Dril
Fort Snelling, Minn., May 25.-Uni
versity students have made more prog
ress in two. days' drill than do the
army recruits in two weeks, accordin
to the statement of an instructor i
the training camp. The men seem t
appreciate their value to the natio
more than uneducated citizens.
79 Students Leave Cincinnati for Wa
Cincinnati, May 25.-Seventy-nin
students of the University of Cincin
nati have left college to enter wa
service. Of this number 16 are o
farms.
Fort Snelling Gets Men from Grinnel
Grinnell, Ia., May 25.-Twenty me
from Grinnell college are now in th
Fort Snelling training camp. The
went to the camp without having ha
previous drill.

Ex-Attorney General Miller Dead instruction of the Princetpn aviation
Indianapolis, May 25.-W. H. H. Mil- corps has begun, and practice flights
ler, 77, attorney general of the United are held every morning and evening'
States under President Benjamin Har- that the weather permits. At present;
rison, died at his home here this after- there are two flying squads, com-
noon. posed of 10 men each.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan