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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EllY

Iuster Roll of Seventh and Eighth
Divisions of Michigan Naval Militia

IIYII5I

Thomas, W. D., '20E.
Thompson, C. 0., '19.
Thompson, L. L., '19.
Trollope, G. A.
Troost, L. D., '19.
Tubbs, R., '20.
Van Schoick, J. D., '17.
Wade, M., '20.
Warner, C. S., '20E.
Wenley, A. G., '20.

1 r _. -

Following is the personnel of the seventh and eighth divisions of Mich-
igan naval militia:

Five-tenths
ge Students
Enlisted

Per Cent of
Have

INI OF UNIVERSITIES
TRAININ4G TO BE LEADERS
er Faculty Men on Same Plane
as Students While
Drilling'
ree and five-tenths per cent of the
rsity students of the United
s are now being trained in gov-
ent military camps throughout
country to be able to lead the
units of the American army.
Iversity men have responded to
all of their government to Join
reserve officers' training corps
alacrity and a large proportion
e menin camps are college un-
'adua tes. Practically every co-
and university has sent a large1
a, in an effort to do its part and
following records show the suc-
of the federal call in the respec-
institutions:
ires Show College Men Respond
Liana has lost 34 out of 2,860, one
ent; Chicago, 28 of 8,510, three-
s per cent; Cornell, 300 of 1,656,
i per cent; Yale, 500 of 3,254, 15
ent; Minnesota, 67 of 13,279, one
iundredths per cent; Wisconsin,
If 5,131, two per cent; Purdue. 25
004, one per cent; Syracuse, 61
)20, one per cent; Arizona, 21 of
four per cent; Washington, 56
055, one per cent, and Kansas.
af 3,200, two per cent. Other uni-
ties and colleges have sent a like
>rtion, men from Brown number-
7; Princeton, 119; Vanderbilt, 30;
it 'Union, 9; Williamette, 9; Co-
ia, 97, and Oregon, 8.
idents Scattered Among Camps.
e students from these institutions
scattered throughout the various
is, among which are Plattsburg,
Sheridan, Madison Barracks,
Benjamin Harrison, Fort Ogle-
ie, Fort Meyer, Fort Riley, Fort
ing, and the San Francisco
.dio. As a rule the men from
college are assigned to the same
anies so that they may live with
friends and work in harmony.
companies are divided between
>r three colleges in order to bring
from different states together.
ny alumni are also being trained
e camps and their number is as
and sometimes larger than t'he!
Iment of the undergraduates.
universities have spread the idea
.g their former students by send-
ut information blanks which were
>gued by the intelligence bureaus.
wing this, the alumni were given
s regarding the training camps
heir enlistment encouraged. Cor-
alumni alone number 100.
ulty Men Join with Students
ulty men have thrown in their
rith their students and former
rts and are doing their bit. In
instances students have been
rted temporary officers in com-
of companies containing pro-
s and alumni. There is no dis-
on being made between young
nd older ones, but the discipline
army has replaced the age di-
s. The khaki and olive drab,
Mize nothing but shoulder-straps.
nost colleges, local reserve offi-
raining corps were organized to
re men for the government
, andas a result, thousands of
its have received a lot of pre-
.ry training which will enable
to better comprehend the work
in camps. Regular military
s are also being given in the
universities to prepare the men
rategic work. The number of
ants from the universities has
ceeded the number accepted by

SEVENTH DIVISION
Lieut. 0. M. McNeil.
Lieut. (J. G.) E. A. Harrington.
Lieut. (J. G.) H. S. Hulburt, surgeon.
Ensign K. W. Heinrich, '17E.
Abrams, Staats M., '17E.
Adair, Roger P.
Alden, Harold W., '18.
Ashley, George F., '17E.
Ball, Robert B., '19E.
Barie, William L., '17E.
Bridge, Robert S., '19E.
Brusstar, James S., '18E.
Butler, Carleton E., '20.
Brodhead, Willis, '17E.
Chapman, William L., '20E.
Cheffey, George L.
Chellis, Dwight F., eng. spec.
Church, Harold C., '18E.
Colcord, Bradford, '20E.
Curtiss, Eugene W., '20E.
Davis, Parlett L., '19E.
Davis, Winfield C., '17E.
Dodd, Russell, '18E.
Dudley, Elbridge Jr., '18E.
Foster, Hazen, '18.
Frye, H. Edward.
Goetz, Frank R.
Grylls, H. M. K., '17E.
Handy, Lee D., '18E.
Hause, Donald, B.
Hauser, Robert.
Higgins, George J., '19E.
Hildner, Egmont G.
Hoag, Paul W., '19E.
Hoffman, Harold D.
Hopkins, Stephens C., '17.
Howard, Ralph H., '17.
Huntington, Norman S.
Jefferys, Paul W., '20E.
Kenyon, Johnson D., '17E.
Kolpien, Alton L., '20M.
Killian, Charles H., '19.
Klager, Walter H.
Knight, Carl E., '19E.
Ladd, Earle S., '18E.
Lewis, George M., '20E.
Liliegren, Carl E., '20E.
LeBlanc, Thomas J., '18M.
Llewellyn, George, '19E.
Loring, Everett 0., '17E.
Loucks, Franklin, '18E.
Manwarring, Barwise.
Maynard, Walter A., '18E.
Nesper, Erwin J., '20E.
Nuttall, M. S., '20E.
O'Kane, James J., '20E.
Osborne, Fowler L., '19E.
Page, John H., '20A.
Pelham, Howard B., '17.
'Phelps, Kenneth G., '20E..
Poppen, John R.,\'17M.
Porter, W. L., eng.
Potter, William H., '20E.
Powell, William L.
Raymond, Phillip T., '18E.
Repke, Monroe, '20.
Robertson, T. B., '20E.
Sadtler, John G., '19E.
Sears, Leon A., '19E.
Scott, Frances C., spec. eng.
Sharkey, Owen T., '17.
Simpson, Jess R., '18.
Smith, Cedric C., '18.
Sparling, Harold I., '19.
Stricker, Henry D., '20.
Thompson, H. R., '19E.
VanDeman, Harold, '20E.
VanOrden, William.
Waite, Virgle H., '20E.
Wolfe, George B., '19L.
Williams, Elmer T., '20E.
Winans, Llewellyn K., '19E.
Young, Floyd E., '20.
Zink, Elmer P., '18E.

Lient. J. R. Hayden.
Lieut. (J. G.) A. E. Boak.
Ensign A. H. Jenkins, '17.
Akers, J. K., '20.
Anderson, W. K., '19E.
Ashworth, S. E., '20.
Ball, T. P.
Beal, T. F., '17.
Bigelow, R. B., '20.
Bird, J. M.
Bolles, N. T., '18.
Burley, R. M., '19.
Caldwell, D. B.
Campbell, W. B., '17.
Cook, A. J.
Coombs, P. B., '19._
Crawford, C., '17L.
Daniels, G. B., '18.
Dodge, K. F.
Dunlap, G. H., '194
Fitch, W. E., '18.
Foster, F. J.
Garrison, H. C., '17.
Grattan, O. C.
Greenwald, R. C., '20E.
Gridley, W. H., '20E.
Grise, E. V., '20.
Hackett, J. F., '20.
Hansen, V. E., '20E.
Hardy, C. W., '19.
Hartman, F. W., '20E.
Hays, R. M., '20E.
Herron, H. C., '18.
Hine, R. C., '20E.
Hoffman, H. W.
Hook, D. R., '20E.
Hyde, H. J., '18.
Jenkins, J. O., '17E.
Keller, P. L..
LeBay, R. E., '19E.
Loucks, A. E., '18.
Luebbers, L. E., '17.
Lumsden, H. M., '19.
Lynch, D. F., '18.
McCormick, A., '19.
McDonald, J. W., '19E.
McKeachie, L. J., '20E.
McRae, G. H., '20.
Mansfield, E. Q., '20E.
Mason, C. H., '19.
Massnick, H. M., '18.
Montague, A. S., '18L.
Moore, R. S., '19.
Mattern, L. H., '19.
Muzzy, H. G., '17.
Nettleton, H. E., '20E.
Page, C. E., '19.
Peterson, W. D., '19.
Potts, P. C., '18L.
Ralya, C., '18.
Ramsey, M., '18.
Reeves, H. M., '18.
Rindge, W. L., '17E.
Runyan, R. A., '17.
Russell, R. A.
Saunders,-L. D., '20E.
Schmok, C. L., '20.
Sheldon, S. A., '20.
Sherrick, R. G., '20E.
Sumner, J. F., '20.
Taylor, R. B., '20E.
Thoeming, G. B., '17.

FIRST AMBULANCE CORPS
UNIT TO SAIL JUNE

EIGHTH DIVISION

1

5

AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Majestic-Douglas Fairbanks in
"In Again Out Again."
Areade--Gladys Brockwell in
"ier Temptation," and Charlie
Chaplin in "The Cure.'
Orpiheui-- Vivian Martin in
"The Spirit of Romance." Also
Triangle comedy and Para.
mount pictograph.
Wuerth-Enid Bennett in "The
Little Brother." Also Keystone
comedy, "Maggie's First False
Step:'
Rae--lme. Petrova in "Bridges
Burned." Also "Purple Mask
No. le."

CAMPAIGN FOR FUNDS SATISFAC.
TORY; STARRETT TO LEAVE
FOR EAST
Michigan's first ambulance corps is
being steadily whipped into shape, and,
the first unit of 25 men will sail June
16 for France. Although the commit-
tee is unable to state at present the
exact sum which the campaign fund
has reached, according to those in
charge, the results are satisfactory.
R. W. Starrett, '20E, who was one
of the first to take up the movement
for a Michigan ambulance corps, will
leave today for New York and other
points in the east to, make final ar-
rangements. While in New York he
will confer with R. H. Heresford who'
is in charge of ambulance corps in'
that city. Starrett will be gone for
about a week or 10 days.
There has been some confusion in
regard to the relationship between this
corps and the federal ambulance corps
which has since been started. It is'
probable, however, that the second unit.
which was planned will become a part
of this recent federal corps.'
There is to be a meeting Friday
night in Detroit at which Mr. Doyle,
who is one of the national organizers
of ambulance corps will speak. A. D.
Rathbone, '19, and T. F. McAllister,
'18, will represent the local corps at
this meeting.
Students Present
Selected Program
Presenting a well rendered and se-
lected program. the advanced pupils
of the School of Music offered an un-
usual variety of talent before an ap-
preciative audience yesterday after-
noon in Hill auditorium.
Those contributing to the program
were as follows: Vocal, Fiske S.
Church, '17; Robert Dieterle, '17; Mrs.
Verne Luther, and Horace Davis, '17.
Piano: Laura Henkel and Alzora Crow-
combe. Violin: Lucy Cannon.
The accompaniments were played
by Mrs. Maud Okkelberg, Miss Gen-
evieve Seyler, Mr. Ben Clark, and Mr.
James W. Hoge.
Elect James Thomas, '18L, Councilman
James Thomas. '18L, was elected
Student council representative of the
junior law class at a meeting yester-
day.

This picture shows the athletic
Fairbanks at his best. He plays the
part of a young man who would rath-
er remain in jail than out of it. He
.is supported by Arline Pretty. The
picture was staged in New Jersey and
this afords the opportunity for many
amusing rural scenes, mostly scenes
of action.
AT THE ARCADE
Charles Spencer Chaplin's new com-
ed , "The Cure," at the Arcade tpday.
offers that novel character more op-
portunities for the use of his special
talents than any of the previous re-
leases.
The main scene of the story is at a
hospital resort where he comes to be
curt-,l of drinking. In preparation he
brings a trunk full of bottles of beer.
Half of S"tudents
Subject to Draft
Approximately one-half the men stu-
Oents in the University are subject to
draft for the new army, according to
the estimate of Registrar Arthur G.
Hall. These men must register for the
conscription under' penalty of impris-
onment and forced registration for
failure to comply with the rules for
the registration.
While few of the freshmen and
sophomores in the literary and engi-
neering colleges come within the age
limits of the draft provision, most of
the juniors and practically all the
seniors are subject to call. In the
Medical and Law schools most of the
men are old enough to be drafted,
while in the dental and pharmacy col-
leges the proportion of men eligible
to draft is about the same as the lit-
erary and engineering college.
Onions Replace Trading Stamps
New York, May 23.--Onions and po-
tatoes have replaced trading stamps
in some parts of the city. The grocers
are giving one with each purchase.

AT THE WHITNEY

D. W. Griffith's "Intolerance" will
be presented Saturday afternoon ands
evening at the Whitney theater.
Paris of the middle ages, Babylon of
the reign of Belshazzar the magnifi-_
cent, and Judea of the time of Christ,
are depicted in the film with great
realism. The fall of the city of Baby-
lon, with its palaces and temples, its
battles and thousands of people, makes
"Intolerance" far surpass "The Birth
of a Nation" in size and finish of pro-
duction.
The reproductions of historic scenes
are made according to the authentic
records which historians have pre-
served..

AT THE :MAJESTIC
Starting today at the Majestic
ater, Douglas Fairbanks will be
in the picture produced by his
company "In Again Out Again."

the-
seen
own

A

-

-,

Refreshment when you're thirsty-A
brimming glass of pure deliciousness
when you want a palate-pleasing drink
-Exactly 'what you're looking for any
time.
Demand the genuine by full name-
nicknames encourage substitution
HiECOCA-COLA CO., ATLANTAGA.
21C
ii- (

1U

MIC HIGAN'S

MOST

SENSATIONAL

COMEDIAN

WALDIO

FELLOW,

'14

WILL APPEAR IN SONGS AND STUNTS AT THE

Life in the camps, according to let-
ters sent home by students. is a con-
tinuousbround of hard labor and much
study, but the food and quarters are
excellent and the regularity is health-
ful. The work hours are long and the
rest hours short, but the men are
healthy and in the best of spirits.
JUNIOR JAMBOREE TICKETS
TO GO ON SALE TO CAMPUS

BigPoplarPatiotc
OF THE
Glee and Mandolin Cub
ALSO -
Banjorine Quintet, Aldrich, Davis, Leininger, Kempton and Gingrich
Duet by Chase B. Sikes, Horace L.I Davis
Tomorrow---Friday Nig

e camps.
College Men Make Best Officers
['he war department has stated that
a most satisfactory men for officers
the United States army are college
duates or upperclassmen of the
iversities because they are well-
icated and competent to act as lead-
of men. Regardless of this de-
ion many camp commanders seem
willing to accept a large proportion
students but prefer older men. This
evidently the reason that the west-
universities have not had so many
their applicants accepted as have
tern ones.

.1
e
b
i
p
1
0
P
v
F
1?
C
R

The remaining tickets for the Junior
Jamboree will be on sale to the gen-'
eral campus today. The tickets may
be secured from any of the follow-
ing committee: B. S. Krause, tele-
phone 1460; Frank Grover, telephone
1505, or Phil Pack, telephone 406-M.
Special music, programs and dec-
orations have been ordered for the
party by the committee, and dancing
will continue from 9 until 1 o'clock.
Flannels and spring clothing will be
in order for the evening.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
:t. ti

Hill Auditoritm

8 P. M.

25 Cents

One hall of the net proceeds above the Club's expenses will be donated to the Ann Arbor
Chapter of the Red Cross.

STOP LOOK LISTEN
JUST RECEIVED A FINE ASSORTMENT OF LACES AND CLEANERS FOR ALL COLORED SHOES AT

VAN'S
J. A. VANDERVEST, Prop.

QUALITY
PHONE 699-W

SHOE.

SHOP
1114 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

___

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