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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOL
TODAY

~LASfriAn

ttl

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

PRICE FIVE CENTS

VOL. XXVII. No. 167.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THUltRSDAY, MAY 24, 1917.

PRICE FIVE CENTSL

I

REGISTRATIONFOR
SELECT WE DRRAFT
ALL MALE STUDENTS BETWEEN
AGES OF 21 AND 31 MUST
REPORT
MEN FROM OUT OF CITY
WILL SIGN CARDS FIRST
Registrar A. G. Hall's Office to Be
Open Extra Hours During
Week
Registration for male students of
the University under the selectiv.e con-
scription act of May 18 will begin at
9 o'clock this morning in the regis-
trar's office in University hall. All
male students who will be at least 21
and not yet 31 years of age on June 5
must register, under penalty of one
year's imprisonment and fine.
All students must register whether
they are citizens of the United States
or not. Registration cards will be
filled out by the registrar or one of
the deputy registrars, who will ask
the student the required questions,.
and signed by the student and regis-
trar. The registration card must be
mailed so that it will reach the stu-
dnt's home precinct where he votes
before June 5, the date of national reg-
istration. With the registration card
the student must enclose a stamped
and self-addressed envelope, in order
that the registration certificate, which
is evidence that the student has reg-
istered, may be returned to the stu-
dent.
Students who will not be registered
in the registrar's office are those whose
homes are in Washtenaw county, and
foreigners and aliens who have no
legal domicile. These will register in
the precincts or townships in Washte-
naw county where they are now resid-
ing. It has been suggested that the
student bring the required stamped
and self-addikessed envelope with him
to the registrar's office so that the
registration cards can be mailed as
soon as filled out.
The cards will be mailed to the reg-
istrar of the student's home prechict,
in the care of the sheriff of the stu-
(dent's home county. If the student
lives in a town the population of which
is over 30 000, he will mail the card
in care of the mayor of the town. In
case the student does not know his
home precinct, he will send the card
as directed at the registrar's office.
Students from states other than
Michigan will register from Thursday
to Monday, May 24 to 28, inclusive,
while those whose homes are in Mich-
igan will register from Tuesday to
Saturday, May 29 to June 2, inclusive
The registrar's office will be open all
these days, Sunday excepted, between
the hours of 9 to 12 o'clock in the
morning and 2 to 5 o'clock in the aft-
ernoon.
The entire responsibility for fulfill-
ing the legal requirements rests on
the student.
SELECT MEN FOR FEDERAL
AMBULANCE CORPS TONIGHT
Final selections of men for the gov
ernment ambulance corps will be mad
at a meeting of all who have signed
for this work at 9:30 o'clock tonigh
at the Michigan Union. No man wil
be considered unless he has passed th

physical examination, the final onek
being held between 2 to 4 o'clock thi:
afternoon at the University health
service.
Sandals May Replace Shoes on Farnm
Sunbury, Pa., May 23.--Sandals may
replace shoes ,in some counties o
Pennsylvania. Many farm clubs in
tend to adopt the new footwear if th
weather will permit. The high pric
of leather is given as the cause.

American Vessel
Sunk by Torpedo
Name of Ship Not Given; May Have
Been One of Seized Ger-
man Liners
Paris, May 23.---An 8,000-ton Ameri-
c n vessel carrying a cargo destined
L)r Switzerland has been tropedoed
and sunk in the Mediterranean today.
The name of the vessel is not specified
in the announcement.
Inquiries of American shipping ex-
perts this afternoon developed the be-
lief that the ship may have been one
of the Ierman liners recently seized
and pressed into service of the United
States. One shipping authority said
that the only vessel anywhere near
8,000 tons that he was aware of being
in the Mediterranean was one of the
German ships which sailed recently
carrying a cargo for Italy.
EN6I11EERING COLLEGE
EXMS BEGIN JUNE 11
SECRETARY L. A. HOPKINS GIVES
OUT SCHEDULE FOR
FINALS
Examinations in the engineering
college will start June 11. according
to an announcement from the office
of Secretary L. A. Hopkins yesterday,
and willsbe held according to the fol-
lowing schedule:
Classes meeting Monday or Wednes-
day-At 8 o'clock (C. E. 2), first Mon-
day, 8-12; 9 o'clock, second Monday,
8-12; 10 o'clock, first Saturday, 8-12;
11 o'clock, first Tuesday, 8-12; 1
o'clock,. second Wednsday, 8-12; 2
o'clock (M. E. 2), first Wednesday,
2-6; 3 o'clock,second Tuesday, 8-12.
Classes meeting Tuesday or Thurs-
day: 8 o'clock, first Tuesday. 2-6; 9
o'clock, second Monday, 2-6; 10 o'clock,
first Wednesday. 8-12; 11 o'clock, first
Friday, 8-12; 1 o'clock (shop 3), sec-
ond Tuesday, 2-6; 2 o'clock, first Fri-
day, 2-6; 3 o'clock (E. M. 1, E. M. 2),
first Thursday, 2-6.
Classes meeting Friday any hour,
and E. M. 3. second Wednesday, 2-6.
Classes meeting Saturday any hour,
second Thursday, 2-6; any day 4-6,
second Thursday, 8-12; drawing 4, 5,
4a, 5a, first Thursday. 8-12; shop 1,
E. M. 4, first Saturday, 2-6; shops 2,
4, C. E. 3, first Monday, 2-6.
Irregular classes will have exam-
inations first Monday. 2-6; first Thurs-
day, 8-12; first Saturday, 2-6; second
Wednesday, 2-6. and second Thursday,
2-6.
The first lecture hour is counted as
the first class in courses with both
lectures and quizzes.
- All conflicts must be reported to the
office of Secretary Hopkins before the
evening of June 2.
- PLAN TO BUILD 32
- CANTONMENT CITIES
Quarters to House New National
Army; Will Accommodate
Over 900,000 Men
Washington. May 23.-Plans for the
- construction of 32 great cantonment
e cities to house the new national army
were under consideration in the quar-
t trmaster department today. Engi-
neering men from all over the country
e have been called in to aid the depart-
s nent as volunteers.

s Secretary Baker assigned Colonel
h Littel to oversee the construction of
the semi-permanent camps. Each of
the cantonments will accommodate
s between 20,000 and 30,000 soldiers,
y amounting in all to more than 900,000
f men. They must be completed within'
- two months. They will require roads,
e sewage and water systems, heating and
e lighting systems, and adequate rail-
road connections.

NAVAL MILITIA LEAVES TONIGHT FOR
GREAT LAKES' TRAINING CAMP PLAN
FAREWELL MEETING FR6 BOYS OF'17

LAY OUT SITE FOR
NEW BARTON CAMP
Prepar ounds on Plan Similar to
Former National Service
Schools
Preparation of the site on Barton
lake for the sixth national service
school is in the hands of Prof. W. C.

SORDIER

RESERVES TO CHICA
FOR ADDITIONAL
WORK

BAND AND ALL DRILL
COMPANIES TO ASS

Prof. J.
with

t. Allen to Present D1vis4
Colors; Governor Sleeper
to Attend Send-Off

Hoad of the engineering college. and The Michigan naval militia leavee

MICHIGAN'S H ELPING HANDS

OPEN TICKET SASE FOR MICHIGANENSIAN TO GO
FRIDA9Y NIGHT CONCERT' ON SAL THIS MORNING
OFFICIALS ENDORSE WORK OF, 1917 BOOK 1)EDICATED TO PRESI-

.1

COMBINED MUSICAL
CLUBS{
Tickets are now on sale for the an-I
nual spring concert of the Glee and
Mandolin clubs to be given tomorrow
night in Hill auditorium. The paste-
boards may be secured at Sheehan's,
Wahr's, Calkin's Drug company ons
Delta Calkin's Drug company on
South University, Trubey's, Grinnell
Bros. music store or from any mem-
ber of the combined clubs.
Dean John R. Effinger and Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall have endorsed the
work of the club in the following
statements:
"Hill auditorium should be crowded
for the Glee club concert, May 25. As
this is to be a joint benefit, the pro-
ceeds to be divided between the local
Red Cross association and the Glee
club itself, popular interest in the en-
tertainment should be especially keen.
The Red Cross certainly deserves sup-
port and the Glee club has done good
work for the University this year
which deserves substantial apprecia-
tion.
"JOHN R. EFFINGER."
"The University Glee and Mandolin
clubs are to be congratulated on the
real service they have rendered to the
campus and the University during re-
cent years. By their loyal and gener-
ous contributions to the interests and
welfare of University life they have
won the hearty and lasting apprecia-
tion and support of both officers and
students. They will receive this same
hearty response to this latest occasion,
on which a share of the proceeds are
to be given to so worthy a cause as
the Red Cross.
"ARTHUR G. HALL."

DENT HARRY B. HUTCH-
INS
Michiganensian sales start this
morning at 8 o'clock in the main cor-
ridor of University hall continuing all
day today and tomorrow. More than
1,400 copies of the 1917 year book, in-
cluding the 1,300 copies already sub-
scribed for will be put on sale during
the two days.
The new edition of Michiganensian
has been dedicated to President Harry
B. Hutchins. In addition to being the
largest year book ever turned out at
this University, this year's publica-
tion contains more snap shots and pic-
tures and new features than any of
its predecessors.
One of the biggest features of the
book is the reproduction in four colors
of six oil paintings by two artists who
are instructors in the college of archi-
tecture. Mr. E. H. Barnes and Mr. L.
A. Mqkielski contributed these paint-
ings, the former having painted three
local scenes and the latter three scenes
in France.
Opposite the "In Memoriam" page
appears a cut of the tablet erected in
Alumni Memorial hall to the memory
of the late President-emeritus James
B. Angell.
**** * * * * * * * * * *
* 3EN TO TAKE TESTS FOR *
* HARPER'S HOSPITAL UNIT *
* * ____

the problems of water supply and
sewerage are now receiving closest
attention.
The camp will be laid out on a plan
similar to former national servicej
camps. It is expected that there will'
be nearly 50 pyramid tents, 16 feet
square, for the use of the students, be-
sides headquarters, Red Cross, store,
hospital, mess, assembly, and matron's
tents. Mess tent will be divided into
two dining rooms. with the kitchen in
the middle.
Professor Hoad is being assisted in
his work by a men's advisory board,
of which Regent Junius E. Beal is
chairman. Other members of the
board are Dr. Victor C. Vaughan, R.
W. Hemphill; and W. E. Underdown.
Applications for membership in the
school are being received by Miss
Alice Evans at Barbour gymnasium.
Fees amount to $35 and regulation uni-
forms must be purchased by all stu-
dents through Mrs. Henry B. Joy,
Grosse Point farms, general chairman
of the school.
SENATOR DEFENDS
WILSON'S SPEECH
Answers. Critics of President's Recent
Address; Says Misappre-
hensions Must Stop
Washington, May 23.-In a remark-
able speech today, Senator Lewis of
Illinois replied to critics of President
Wilson's speech to the directors of the
American Red Cross, in which the
president said that this country has
no specific reasons for entering the
war.
"There has been great misappre-
hension as to what the president
meant," Lewis said. "I believe I may
say that he meant this country had
no one particular grievance, but did
have broad grounds in world democ-
racy and rights of mankind."
The senator later said that "If the
present misapprehensions were al-
lowed to continue, the government
would have difficulty in floating its
bonds and pursuing its military pro-
gram."
DISCUSS FOOD BILL
Problem of Supply Control Now Be-
fore Senate and House
By J. P. Yoder
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 23.-The big fight
in congress to determine the scope of
the food control by the government
kuring the war was launched today.
Both in the house and in the senate
the first of the two administration
food control bills were reported. Both
provide a thorough survey of all food
products in the country, for the pre-
vention of waste, and for appropria-
tions to eliminate animal parasites.
The total appropriations are $15,000,-
000.
Princeton Trains 35 Aviators
Princeton, N. J., May 23.-Thirty
five students of Princeton university
are being trained as aviators in the
university aviation school.

tonight.
After a farewell demonstration ten-
dered the militia at 8 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium by the combined
efforts of the University and the citi-
zens of Ann Arbor, and following a
half-hour service beginning at 7:15
o'clock in the St. Andrews Episcopal
church, the Seventh and Eighth di-
visions of the first battalion, Michigan
naval militia, will march back to the
gymnasium.
The band will meet at 7:30
o'clock in front of Waterman gym.
The naval militia, in uniform, will
fall in behind the band.
The University volunteer coM-
panies will assemble at 7:30
o'clock sharp, on North University
and Washtenaw avenues and fall
in behind the naval militia in the.
following order:
The engineering company will
head the column; then the law stu-
dents, the medical students, the lit-
erary students and then any other
department that is drilling.
In case of rain, the volunteer un-
its will not meet but the naval mil-
itia will march with the band as
announced.
After the entertainment, the au-
dience will please remain seated
until the band and naval militia has
marched out.
The volunteer units will again
line up in the same order in which
they came in to form the parade
back to the gymnasium.
They will be escorted by the Uni-
versity band under Major Wilson, to
be followed in parade by the student
body, Company I, -Michigan national
guard, and the University training
squads.
Shortly afterward the four Pullman
cars attached to the 10:42 o'clock train
will take the boys to the Great Lakes
naval station, 30 miles north of Chi-
cago, according to orders received late
Tuesday night and announced at quar-
ters yesterday morning in Waterman
gymnasium.
Prepare for Send-off
Extensive preparation has been
made by a committee headed by Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins and Charles
. ink of the School of Music,,to give
the boys a send-off worthy of the oc-
casion.
The student body and the public
are asked to congregate in Hill audi-
torium and be seated by 8 o'clock to-
night. President Hutchins will pre-
side and deliver a short address. Mu-
sic will be furnished by the Univer-
sity band.
Governor Albert E. Sleeper of Mich-
ig n is invited and will give a'short
talk. The Hon. Truman H. Newberry
of Detroit, ex-secretary of the navy
under ex-President Roosevelt, will ad-
dress the militia, while Dr. L. P. HalL-
will say a few words in behalf of the
Ann Arbor branch of the American
Red Cross.
Present Division Colors
Prof. J. R. Allen of the engineer-
ing college will formally present to
the two divisions their colors on be-
half of Mrs. J. T. Broadhead and Mrs.
(Continued on Page Six.)

* All men enlisted with the am-
bulance unit of Harper's hospital,
* Detroit should report for physical
' examination this afternoon.
* DOCTOR HAMILTON.
*** * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*

l'I

WALDO FELLOWS

Hill Auditorium

25 Cts.

h

TODAY
in
University
Hall

Michiganensian
On Sale Today, in University Hall

TODAY
in
University.
Hall

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