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May 20, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-20

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WEATHER(
RALLY FAIR
TODAY

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UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

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VOL. XXVII. No. 164. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 20, 1917. PRICE FIEcm

SOPHOMORES WIN
SPRING CONTESTS
BY SCORE OFA-3
SECOND YEAR MEN TAKE LAST
TWO RELAY
RACES
FRESHMEN CAPTURE
PUSH-BALL CONTEST
Yearling Abducts E. E. Wieman, '19,
Depriving Sophs of
Captain
By winning two out of the three
relays in the second bout of the un-
derclass games held yesterday after-
noon at Ferry Field the sophomores
gained two more points and defeated
the freshmen in the annual spring con-
testst by a score of four to three. The
favorable weather conditions brought
out hundreds of spectators to view the
sports.
Meetings on the campus at 2 o'clock
the two classes marched to the field
where they were smeared with the dis-
tinguishing green and red paint. The
relays were held first and the year-
lings started off by winning the initial
race.- The sophomores came back a
won the next two, thereby cinching
their victory in the combined contests.
Although the freshmen had spirited
away their captain, E. E. Wieman, the
sophomores appointed a substitute
and began the pushballecontest which
took place directly after the relays.
Arriving in Ann Arbor when the games
were over Weiman related the thrill-
ing tale of his abduction.,
Some ingenious freshmen using the
name of the Major Castle, made an
appointment with the soph captain for
1 o'clock in Waterman gymnasium.
When the unsuspecting victim had
made his way to the supposed office of
the major 15 burly freshmen bound
and gagged him, and took him to a
point about 15 miles from Ann Arbor.
Here they left him ti free himself and
find his way back.
Although' minus their captain the
outnumbered sophomores put up so
strenuous a fight that the yearlings
were unable to score a goal. At the
end -of the final quarter the ball had
been pushed 20 feet into the sophs'
territory and the freshmen were de-
clared winners. No serious injuries
were sustained, the contestants suf-
fering only from the heat and lack of
air. ,
After the contest the freshmen rolled
the ball to Hill auditorium where
their picture was taken.
REPORT INCREASE
OF AIR ACTIVITIES
British Forces Bring Down Two En-
emy Aeroplanes and Two
Balloons
London, May 19.-Increase of air ac-
tivities in inverse proportion to the
severity of the fighting on the ground
was indicated in Field Marshal Haig's
report tonight.
"Northeast of Eddy there was hos-
tile artillery," he said. "Two enemy
aeroplanes and two balloons were
brought down by our forces yesterday.

Five of our aeroplanes are missing,"
the report stated.
BRAZIL RAILWAY COMPANY
PLANTS NUCLEUS COLONIES
Rio De Janeiro, May 19.--Following
an idea very similar to that adopted
by James J. Hill in his "empire build-
ing," the Brazil Railway company has
established a number of "nucleus
colonies" along its right of way
through uninhabited sections of Bra-
zil's interior. The colonists who set-
tle in these towns are assisted by both
the railroad company and the govern-
ment until they become self-support-
ing.
Thirteen colonies consisting of 641
families, a total of 1,593 persons, have
been established in the last year, and
have proved that pioneering in Brazil

PUT LID ON SOUTH
ANTI-DRAFT PLOTS
Disclose Two Plans in Western Texas
Against Military Policy of
Government
Dallas, Texas, May 19.-An 'armed
uprising against the selective service
law has been nipped in the bud in
western Texasthrough the vigilance
of United States authorities, it was
mrade known here today. Seven men,
said to be ring leaders of the plot,
were arrested and brought from Sny-
der, Surry county, tonight.
Adaline, Texas, May 19.-Several al-
leged conspirators against the gov-
ernment were arrested at Rotan, Fish-
er county, tonight. They have con-
fessed, according to information re-
ceived here.
P. A. Hickey, editor of a socialist
paper published at Dalletsville, was
released under $1,000 bond on the
charge of conspiracy to enter the fed-
eral grand Jury Oct. 1. The arrests
tonight are part of a move toward
breaking up of alleged wholesale an-
archistic movements throughout west-
ern Texas. Additional arrests in this
section are expected.
CHILDREN O EUROPE
WAR'SWORSTICTIMS

EXAMS COMMENCE
ELEVENTH Of JUNE

U. S. WarChiefs Busy Planning
The Dispatch of P ershing 's Force'

By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 19. - UniformedI

Schedule for Second Semester
Will Be Given Out To-
morrow

Finals I men plotting America's war destinies

LITERARY COLLEGE EXAMS
TO CONTINUE FOR TWO WEEKS
All Four-hour Classes Except Wednes-
day Will Be Examined During
Tuesday Period
Examinations in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts w'l be-
gin Monday, June 11, and will bg held
in accordance with the following
schedule, except that all four-hour
classes meeting on Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday, shall be ex-
amined at the periods belonging to the
Tuesday time of recitation.
Monday or Wednesday classes: at 8.
first Monday 9-12; at 9, second Mon-
day 9-12; at 10, fir'st Saturday 9-12;
at 11, first Tuesday 9-12; at 1, second
Wednesday 9-12; at 2, first Wednes-
day 2-5; at 3, second Tuesday 9-12.
Tuesday or Thursday classes: at 8,
first Tuesday 2-5; at 9; second Monday
2-5; at ,10, first Wednesday 9-12; at
11, first Friday 9-12; at 1, second Tues-
day 2-5; at 2, first Friday 2-5; at 3,
first Thursday 2-5.
Friday, any hour, second Wednesday
2-5; Saturday any hour, second Thurs-
day 2-5; any day 4-6, second Thursday
9-12. Irregular classes not provided
for, first Monday 2-5; first Thursday
9-12, first Saturday 2-5, second Wed-
nesday 2-5, or second Thursday 2-5.
Economics 1, first Wednesday 2-5;
psychology 7, first Tuesday 9-12; zo-
ology 24, first Thursay 9-12. Examin-
ation schedules may be obtained at the
registrar's office tomorrow.
Solemn Seniors
to Writhe Soon

behind barred doors hastened their
labors today so that Old Glory might
wave over France quickly and ef-
ficiently. Stirred by the knowledge
that the raising of an American army
is at last authorized, they planned the
dispatch of the first 28,000 men under
General Pershing's leadership, and
mapped out details of equipment and
forces.
War wheels that had been filled by

congressional indolence whirled anew.
The navy department started the ball
rolling with the announcement that a
regiment of marines would go with
Per.shing as infantry, under command
of Colonel Doyen.
Men who will aid General Pershing
In his great task were busy all day]
with details of the expedition which
will put the first real American fight-
ers on European soil in the struggle
against Teuton autocracy. While they
labored, other army chiefs busied
themselves with machinery for the big
camp system, wherein America will
train her fighters.

HOOVE HCONSENT
TO TAKE OFFIC
OF FOODDICTATE
ACCEPTS APPOINTMENT ON C
DITION THAT HE RECEIVE
NO PAY
WANTS CO-OPERATION
ON VOLUNTEER BAS
Expect Definite Policy of Food (
servation to Take Form
Immediately

I

FELLOWS WILL FATURE GOVERNOR PROCLIMS
A NUA SPRING CONCERT MAY 30 MEMORIAL. DAY

Washingtojn, May 19.-Herbert (
Hoover expressed his willingness t(
night to serve as "food administrato:
on condition that he receive no Da;

MRS.

JOSEPh LINDEN SMITH
TELLS OF RED CROSS
WORK

"The most innocent, the most path-
etic of all the victims of the great
war in Europe are the children," de-
clared Mrs. Joseph Linden Smith of
Boston introducting her talk on Red.
Cross relief work in France, at Sarah
Caswell Angell hall last night. "Each
case," she said, "is a veritable Greekr
tragedy, and the fright of these ter-
ror-stricken children many of whom
have seen their mothers shot down,
can never be forgotten."
Mrs. L. P. Hall of this city, introduc-
ed the speaker, whom she met on the
ship on which they both returned
from Europe last December. Mrs.
Smith pointed.out the work which is
being done in the large buildings and
chateaux in southern France which
have been set aside as homes for the
lost orphaned children.
"When many ofthem first come," she
said, "they have lost confidence in
everybody and refuse to speak for
days, their first question often being
in regard to the cellar in which they
are to hide in case of a German at-
attack. Due to the careful attention
which the Sisters give them and
to the cheerful surroundings, the lit-
tle ones soon become interested again,
and learn American songs which they,
sing to the Americans working among
them.
"Out of- the 2,000 children we have
,cared for," said the speaker, "but
eight have died of sickness, and we
have been able to identify all but 30
of them through the records of the
central office at Paris. These 30 came
from districts where the civil records
had been destroyed by Germans, and
therefore identification was impos-
sible."
It requires but $72 a year to care
for a child, according to the speaker,
and it is not necessary to ask any
assistance from the French govern-
ment. Mrs. Smith appealed to the
women to sew for the relief work, and
to all the audience to join the Red
Cross movement. Anyone desiring to
be of some help can obtain information
from Mrs. L. P. Hall.
PREDICTS SMALL CHANCE FOR
COMPULSORY FOOD RATIONING
London, May 19.-While England
probably will have to begin doing
without sugar in a few weeks, and only
certain classes of workmen will be
permitted to have beer, there is small
chance of compulsory food rationing
Kennedy Jones told the United Press
today.
"It looks like we will have a rich
harvest, he said, which will make com-
pulsory rationing unnecessary. Most
likely the government will take over
the beer industry after November, and
supply beer only to certain classes of:
workmen. At present there is only a
two weeks' supply of sugar in Eng-
land."

3la

FORMER CAMPUS STAR TO AP-
PEAR AT COMBINED CLUBS
ENTERTAINMENT
Waldo Fellows, '14, will be one of
the big drawing card for the ap-
pearance of the clubs this year.
While in college Mr. Fellows was
popular as a comedian in campus pro-
ductions. He starred in several Mich-
igan operas and in one of them sang
the alleged funniest song that has
ever been produced at Michigan. This
was ."Things They Never Say," which
he will sing again Friday night.{
In addition to his operatic suc-
cess Mr. Fellows was a prominent
member of the Glee and Comedy
clubs. He will sing several popular
songs playing his own accompainment.
As an encore he will probably give
his well known movie piano player's
stunt of which he is the originator.
Other features of the concert will
be solos by popular campus singers
and the bajorine sextettes which
made a big hit on the western trip.
Part of the concert proceeds will
be donated to the Red Cross.
CHILEAN MINISTER PREDICTS
NO EXPORTING AFTER WAR
Santiago De Chile, May 19.-Not one
of the European belligerents will be
able to do much export business for
a long time after the war, according
to Miguel Cruchaga Tocornal, Chilean
minister in Berlin.
The government has received a long
report from the minister on the sub-
ject of European trade. His com-
munication was intended primarily as
an answer to stories that Germany
is' getting ready to flood foreign mar-
kets with accumulated goods as soon
as peace is restored.
The fact, he says, is that Germany
has used up all her accumulations and
has been able to produce no more
manufactures because she has had to
concentrate all her energies upon war
supplies.
In official circles here this is inter-
preted as meaning that South America
will remain dependent upon the United
States for a long period.

WAR WITH GERMANY MAKES DAY ment for his services, and that

Number of Gargoyle Will -Nike
Expose of Foibles of the
Last Year Men

ESPECIALLY AUS-
PICIOUS

Material for the forthcoming num-
ber of the Gargoyle, which will appear
on the campus at noon Tuesday, is
said to be particularly varied in its
nature. The gay and festive spirit of
the spring as evinced in prose and
verse, vies with the satire and dire
accusations directed at the senior
class.
Roger Davis, '20, has contributed a
double page drawing depicting "Swing
Out Past and Present," and another
entitled "What They Wear Beneath
Their Gowns."
A cover design by Reed Bachman,
'20, also conveys the idea of the Swing-
out in appropriate and pleasing fash-
ion.
DAYLIGHT BILL ORDERED TO
SENATE FAVORABLY REPORTED'

Well-nigh three score years have
passed since our fathers took up arms
for the cause of the Union. Tht was
a righteous war, a holy war. It was
waged for unity and liberty and hu-
man happiness. Four years the con-
flict raged. Then came the end, and
the Union was saved and the slaves
were set free. Some of those who
fought in that war are with us yet,
though a fast diminishing company.
Year by year their ranks grow thin-
ner. One by one their comrades leave
them.
For many years our people have
gone forth on Memorial day to place
flowers on the graves of those veter-
ans of the great Civil war who have
gone beyond, and to pay a tribute of
respect to those who still remain. It
is a beautiful custom. May the time
never come when it shall die out.
May this generation, and the genera-
tions yet to come, never forget what
they owe to the brave men who fought
their battles for them.
Especial Significance
This year Memorial day has an espe-
cial significance. With most of us,
up to this time, the observance of
the day has been more or less perfunc-
tory. We have scarcely realized its
meaning. Today that meaning is
brought home to us through the grim
reality of war. The world at war!
Three years ago we scoffed at the sug-
gestion. It could not be. The thing
was unthinkable; but the impossible
happened. The great powers across
the sea came to death-grips. Men's
hearts melted within them. In Eu-
rope a deep-seated earthquake seemed
to heave up the basis of civil life and
the tribunals of men and the thrones of
monarchs, and the temples of God
were shaken to the lowest atom of
their structure. Still we hoped that
our land would fare free. Neutral we
would remain, and go calmly about
our peaceful pursuits. It was not
to be. The menace to human freedom
became too frightful; and today we
are at war. Our sons are being
drafted. Our daughters are enlisting
under the Red Cross banner. From
ocean to ocean the nation is girding
up its loins for the fray.
Righteous War
This too is a righteous war. We did
not want war. We did our best to
keep out of war; but there was no
escape from the situation. The rights
of all neutrals were being contemptu-
ously disregarded. The freedom of
the seas was being denied us. Ameri-
can citizens were being slaughtered in
defiance of international law and all
the rules of civilized warfare. De-
mocracy was being slowly throttled,
and our very existence as a free na-
tion was being threatened. This ruth-
less war rang out a strident challenge
to our manhood. Our cause then is
a just cause. It is the cause of hu-
.(Continued on Page Four.)
REV. L. A. BARRETT TO TALK
ON RELIGION AND WORLD CRISIS
Rev. L. A. Barrett will take "Formal
Religion and the World Crisis" as his,
topic for the morning service at the
Presbyterian church. The service will
begin at 10:30 o'clock. At noon bible
school will be held for all classes. In
the evening the theme of the young
peoples' service will be "Friendships."

whole force under him, exclusive of
clerical assistants, shall be employed
so far as possible under the same
volunteer basis.
The president said "the proposed
food administration is intended only
to meet a manifest emergency, and to
continue only while the war lasts.
Since it will be composed for the most
part of volunteers there is no need
to fear the possibility of anything per-
manent arising out of it. All control
of consumption will disappear when
the emergency has passed.
Urges Producers Volunteer Aid
The president urged that all associa-
tions of producers and distributors of
food stuff mobilize and volunteer in
the work of co-operation. The presi-
dent's food proclamation further pro-
vided as follows: "Volunteer mobiliza-
tion of food producers and distributors
for intelligent control of food con-
sumption; no inquiry into existing
available food stuffs costs and prac-
tices of food producing and distribut-
ing trade; prevention of all food
hoarding and "hoarders"; requisition-
ing of food supplies and equipment for
handling them when necessary; gov-
erument establishment of places to
guarautse farmers their profit; pro-
hibition of food waste; licensing of
legitimate mixtures and milling per-
centages, and government food co-
trol to end immediately after the war."
Except Prompt Action Matter -
With Hoover's appointment a definite
policy of food conservation is ex-
pected to take form immediately. The
'president has already urged prompt
action by congress on the food con-
trol legislation he has drawn up. The
attitude of the government on the em-
bargo question is coming to light.
Steps will be taken immediately to
prevent supplying food to Germany
through Scandanavian countries and
Holland, it was learned today. The
house and senate conferees on the
espionage bill- have agreed to let the
embargo provision remain in the
measure.
LAST MEETING OF UNITARIAN
STUDENTS TO BE HELD TONIGHT
Members of the Unitarian Students'
society will hold their last regular
meeting of the year this evening at
the home of Prof. J. Langley, 2037
Geddes avenue.
The meeting will be held out of doors
and the subject for discussion will be
"The Relation of the Young People to
the Church." The members will leave
in a body for the home of Professor
Langley from the church at the cor
n.er of State and Huron streets where
they will meet at 6:30 o'clock.
Several members of- the Unitarian
Young People's society of Detroit will
be present as guests. There will prob-
ably be a special meeting of the lo-
cal society next week for the election
of officers.
PUT 1,000 MICHIGANENSIAN
COPIES ON SALE THIS WEEK
One thousand copies of the 1917
Michiganensian will be placed on sale
Wednesday and Thursday of this week
in the corridor of University hall. The
books are being bound in Detroit and
according to A. L. Kirkpatrick, '18,
business manager, will be on sale in
time.
Five hundred of the books will be
sold on Wednesday and 500 on Thurs-
day. The men leaving school can
leave their slips and $2.50 and the
book will be mailed to them at their
new address.

Washington, May 19.-The Calder
daylight saving bill was ordered fav-
orably reported tot the senate today
orably reported to the senate today
commerce.
, This is the first long step taken in
congress to bring about the saving
of an hour of daylight during the sum-
mer months. If it becomes a law the
clocks all over the country will be,
set forward an hour.

Women's Service League Meets Today
How to co-operate most efficiently
with the aims and work of the Na-
tional league or women's service will
be discussed at the meeting of the Wo-
men's league for constructive service
to be held at 4 o'clock tomorrow at
Newberry hall.

Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division Streets

!0:30 A. M.-Leonard A. Barrett.
the World Crisis.

Formal Religion and

NOON-Prof. Thos. E. Rankin speaks to University classes. 1
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Evening Service.
First Methodist Church
A. W. Stalker, D. D., Minister
10:30. "Life's Two Worlds."
7:30. A Beautiful Mothers' Day Program.

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