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May 25, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-25

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EATH R
SHOWVERS;

;
i'
a

I

r Si4ilr 43an

Iaitx

I m,

PRESS
DAY AND NIGHTI
SERVICE

TODAY

IL. No. 169.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 25, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

-

NACE ENGLAD
GEORGE SAYS ALLIES A 11
iTROYING SUBMARINES
WITH SPEED
)ATS UNBE ATEN,
T NOT DANGEROUS
its Local Engagements in Som-
Sector; American Aviators
Guard Paris
y The Associated Press)
an submarines are operating
south coast of Ireland as is,
from the sinking of the Brit-
ed merchant cruiser, Molaera
George, speaking at Edin-
said that the submarines are
conquered, but that it is no
z serious menace to. the Allies.
that the U-boats are being de-
faster than they can be built
Germans, while the Allies are
ships faster than the enemy

R. H. FRICKEN, '19,
WINS IN ELECTION
Roy H. Fricken, '19, was elected
president of the Oratorical associa-
tion for the. collegiate year 1918-19
in the all-campus election held yes-
terday, which was characterized by
heavy balloting.
Others who were elected officers of
the association are: Carl G. Brandt,
'20, vice-president; Vera Andrus, '19,
secretary; and Webb R. Clark, '20,
treasurer.
A total of 345 votes was cast. Of
these, Fricken received 175 for presi-
dent; Herman A. August, '19, 113;
and John C. Cary, '19, 57. Brandt
received 245 votes for vice-president,
while Morris Paris, '19, received 94.
Two hundred and thirty-one votes
were cast in favor of Vera Andrus,
'19, for the secretaryslbp of the as-
sociation, while Mabel E. Bannister,
'19, greceived 98. Two hundred and
twenty-seven votes were counted in
favor of Webb R. Clark, '20, for treas-
urer, while there were 107 for his op-
ponent, Herman Parzen, '19.
ETMULLEN DETAILED
TOFORT SHERIAN CAMP

Nay Raise Volunteer Age Limit
Washington, May 24.-Another move toward full utilization of the
country's man power was made today when Secretary Baker sent to con-
gress the draft of a bill supporting to raise the nation's age unit for a vol-
untary enlistment into the army, from 40 to 55 years. All men over 40 so
enlisted would be assigned to non-combatant service.
In a letter to Speaker Clark asking that the bill be put through, Sec-
retary Baker said that every man of above 40 years so enlisted in non-com-.
batant branches of the service will make available for duty with the Al-
lied troops, the men beyond the present age limit.

ig in Somme District
zone in France there
iy local engagements,
the Somme sector. The
a raid on the British
pturing prisoners. In
lion, and on both sides

NINE
TO

ALTERNATES ARE CHOSEN
REPLACE MEN IN NAVAL
RESERVE

ver in the Flanders ba
has been heavy artillei
he Ancre river in the r
and south of the Son
M~oreuil and Montididie
iave been in action. TI
erial activity along t.
.e front continues wi
'tieipating in air' fightir
operations.
Tutors Guard Paris
ans repeat their attemp
Paris from the air, An
ake part in the attack
aviators are now pr
attempt to reach ti
Ll.
Berlin's promise that t]
es would not penetra
Russia, a large army
withli 25 miles of Kur

t-

Lieut. George C. Mullen has been

-OUTS FOR
ONTEST MONDA

ry detailed to attend the summer train-
e- ing camp to be held at Fort Sheridan,
- Ill., from June 3 to July 3, according
to a telegram received yesterday
he morning from Adjutant General Hen-
th ry O. Heistand, of the central depart-
ng ment, Chicago, Ill.
The commandant of the University
R. O. T. C. will probably leave Ann
ts Arbor June 2. Lieutenant Mullen's
ts attendance at the training camp will
give the University students who
' have been recommended for the
e camp an opportunity for further in-
Le struction. It is not. known at the
present time whether Lieutenant Mul-
he len will be placed in charge of the
te University men. A number of pro-
is fessors of military science and tactics
st from other universities have been de-
tailed also to attend the Fort Sheri-
dan camp.
Nine Alternates Chosen
1Y Nine alternates to attend the camp
were recommendqd by Lieutenant
ty Mullen yesterday afternoon. The al-
ty ternates are taking the places of the
ay students who belonged to the naval,
ag reserve, enlisted in various branches
ck of the service, or drafted..
on The list, composed of the follow-
or ing alternates, has been sent to the
ie central department:
J. W. Wills, Ray VanVolkenburg,
e- James F. Beal, Clinton H. Dearborn,
us J. A. Spence, Francis I. Nolen, John
;s T. Finley, John H. Pilkington, and
he Perry P. Hutchinson.
ry More May Re Picked
y An additional list of alternates may
be drawn up if any more of the stu-
m dents, who have already been recom-
n- mended for the camp, notify Lieuten-
se ant Mullen of their inability to re-
at port at Fort Sheridan on June 3. This
is the first list, which was selected
e- from the 46 alternates, issued by the
ot commandent.

NUNS MAKE ATTEMPTS
TO REPAIR SUB-BASE
ENEMY DIGGING NEW CANAL AT1
ZEEBRUGGE FOR OPEN SEA
PASSAGE
London, May 24. - Attempts to
blow up the two concrete laden ships,
sunk in the entrance to the Bruges
canal at Zeebrugge by the British,
have been unsuccessful, according to
information received here. Photo-
graphs taken by British airmen show
that the enemy is now engaged in,
cutting away the piers in an effort to
outflank the obstruction, hoping to
make a large enough channel for tor-
pedo crafts and other vessels larger
than submarines, to pass out to sea.
Attempt to Escape
The photographs also showed that
German crafts in the canal are head-
ed westward, which indicates, accord-
ing to the British admiralty, that they
are evidently trying to pass out by
way of Ostend, where the canal en-
trance is not blocked as completely
as it is at Zeebrugge.
Water Depth at Ostend Varies
It is doubtful, however, whether
there is sufficient water at the Ostend
outlet to enable smaller boats plow-
ing their way into deeper water.
The pictures made there by British
airmen show that the depth of the
water at Ostend varies, a depth of as
low as four feet being recorded.
Air force contingents of the Brit-
ish navy carried out bombing opera-
tions against the Zeebrugge mole,
the seaplane base, and shipping in the
vicinity, during the period from May
20 to May 22, says the statement is-
sued by the admiralty today.
DATE OF REGISTRATION FOR
YOUTHS CHANGED TO JUNE 5
Registration of men who have at-
tained the age of 21 since last June
will take place on June 5 only, in-
stead of June 5 to 18, as was an-
nounced yesterday. Arrangements
are being made whereby University
men, coming - under the registration,
may attend to the matter at the reg-
istrar's office.
Men who are not expecting to be in
town on registration day, may attend
to their registration before that time
by calling at the offices of the local
draft board, in the county building.
DR. H. D. BARSS, '141, RESIGNS
FROM UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
Dr. Harold D. Barss, '14M, instruc-
tor in surgery at the University hos-
pital, has tendered his resignation
and will leave to go into private
practice with Dr. T. J. Carney at Al-
ma, Mich., on July 1. Dr. Barss' res-
ignation will be felt keenly by the
medical faculty as he has been teach-
ing the senior sections in generalsur-
gery and has been a very valuable
man to the department. His success-
or has not been appointed as yet.
New York Firm Needs Law Students
One of the large New York insur-
ance companies offers a good position
in the legal department for any Mich-
igan student or alumnus who desires
to attend law school at night in New
York city. The salary, while nomi-
nal, will provide a livelihood and the
experience gained will be of great
value to the student in his chosen
profession.
Further details may be had by
communicating with Frank W. Pen-
nell, '12, 34 Nassau street, New York

city.
Dean of Columbus to Address Menorah
Assistant Dean Nathan Isaacs, of
the Columbus law school, will address
the Menorah society at 8 o'clock Sun-
day evening on "Legalism ip Jewish
History.";

SOLICITORS CANVASS
NOT DISPLAYING
CARDS

"DOUBLE THE QUOTA" is
CITY RED CROSS SLOGANl

ilOUSE S
"V" v

With voluntary contributions for
the Ann Arbor. Red Cross drive ag-
gregating more than $18,000, the com-
mittee yesterday began canvassing
the city, with the idea of "doubling
the quota" of $13,000.
Owing to the difficulty of counting
up the large number of contributions
and pledges, the subscriptions have
not yet been accurately tabulated.
Many subscriptions have kept com-
ing in even though the "volunteer"
days ended, but they cannot be of-
ficially included among those entitled
to the voluntary badge.
Reports yesterday showed that con-
tributions from cash subscriptions
amounted to $11,040.15, Liberty bonds
to $250, war savings stamps to $15,
and pledges to $1,903.75, making a
total of $13,208.90. This together
with money collected from other
sources aggregate not less than $18,-
000, according to officials.
Several hundred solicitors hre can-
vassing every house in the city that
does not display a voluntary card,
and this will be continued until the
close of the campaign, with the view
of "doubling the quota."
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB ELECTS
OFFICERS FOR COMING YEAR
At the annual elections of the Cos-
mopolitan club last night in Lane hall,
the following officers for 1918-19 were
elected:'
President, Sotokichi Katsuizumi,
grad.; student members of the board
of directors, A. M. Elkind, '19E, M. D.
Immerman, '19D, N. S. Chavre, '20E,
and M. Uyehara, School of Music;
faculty members of the board, Prof.
J. A. C. Hildner and Prof. J. Raleigh
Nelson; associate members of the
board, Mr. T. A. Lowrie and Mr. Roy
C. Jacobson; chapter editor, Alfredo
Ramos, '19L.
The annual banquet of the club will
be held at 6:30 o'clock next Saturday
evening inthe Methodist church.
PROF. FRAYER TO LECTURE
TO RUSSKI KRUZHOK TODAY
Prof. William F. Frayer, of the his-
tory department, will lecture before
the Russki Kruzhok at 4 o'clock this
afternoon in Sarah I Caswell Angell
hall on "The Russian Situation in Its
Relation to European Politics."
After the lecture there will be a re-
ception in the parlors of the gymna-
sium. This will be the last meeting
of the society for this school year.
The public are invited to attend both
lecture and reception. -
Oratory Class to Hold Story Hour
The class in story telling, instruct-
ed by Mr. Ray K. Immel, of the ora-
tory department, will hold a story
hour at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon
in room 302, Mason hall. The pro-
gram will last an hour.
Mothers are invited to bring or
send children between the ages of
five and ten to this entertainment. All
people interested in literature for
children are also invited to attend.

for the Liber
,king contes
. Tuesday, M

M. ROVILLAIN TO
JOIN FRENCH ARMY
Eugene E. Rovillain, former officer
in the French marines and for the
past year an instructor in the French
department of the University, has en-
listed as a private in the French army
and is awaiting his passports to sail
for France. M. Rovillain, since be-
ing in this country, has made many
unsuccessful attempts to get into both
the French and American service, but
his bad eyesight has always been a
great barrier to him. With almost
all hope gone, however, of getting into
the service again, M. Rovillain decided
to put in one more application at the
French offices in Chicago and was fin-
ally accepted.
"If it were not for the call of the
war I would never thing of leaving
my students," said M. Rovillain last
n ght, "for I have enjoyed them here
at Michigan very much."
After being retired from the French
marines, M. Rovillain went to Mexico,
where he stayed for some time before
coming to New York. He graduated
from Columbia university with high
honors,, and came to the University
last fall after teaching a year in a
high school at Jackson, Mich.
FINE ACINGFATURES'
GALSWORTHY'S "THE SILVER ,
BOX" IS GREAT SUC-
CESS

BRITISH CRUIS
WITH Ui 1 S. FR[
SUNK; 56 MISS
STEA3IER IOLAERA SUNK
OUT WARNING; MEN I
HAMMOCKS
SHIP ON WAY FROM
ENGLAND TO FRA
No Indication of What Units 11
Board; Probably Carrying I
tingent for France

room 3Z, Maso
ur, 7 o'clock, is f
litary drill, whi
11 others.
required to d
e extemporaneo
assigned to the
re they take t
s of the orato
judges of the tr

(S. L.)
Characterized by excellent acting,
"The Silver Box," by John Galswor-
thy, was given a splendid dramatiza-
tion in University Hall last night.
"The Silver Box" is John Gals-
worthy's cry against the legal injus-
tice that is meted out to the lower
classes in England. Two men. one the
son of a wealthy member of parlia-
ment, Jack Barthwick, and another,
a poor "down-and-out" laborer, Jones,
are guilty of the same offense, com-
mitting theft while under the influ-
ence of liquor. Jones receives a'
punishment of one month at hard la-
bor, while the influence that is
brought to bear in young Barthwick's
favor results in his getting off scot-
free.
Gladys Greening, '19, as Mrs. Jones,
played the part of a broken-down
woman, struggling hard in the fight
of life, in an appealing way that won
her the complete sympathy of the au-
dience. Miss Greening displayed in
her acting a thorough understanding
of her role that entitles her to be
ranked among the best dramatic tal-
ent on the campus.
Forsyth, '20, as Barthwick
Richard A. Forsyth, '20, as John
Barthwick, M. P., gave a vivid pre-
sentation of a fluttery member of the
Liberal party who, as a matter of
principle, desires to press the charge
of the theft of his son's silver cigar-
ette box against Jones, but is anxious
at all costs to have the news of his
son's theft kept out of the newspa-
pers. His acting showed finish and
was thoroughly convincing. La Verne
Ross, grad., as his wife, played the
part of the typical spouse of a mem-
ber of the English parliament in ex-
cellent fashion.
Carl L. Dahlstrom, '19, as Jones,
was one of the stars of the perform-
ance in his portrayal of the despised
workingman who is unable to receive
justice for himself, and ends the play
with a scathing denunciation of the
injustice to be found in English law
courts. Dahlstrom is leaving today to
enter the national service.
Crocker, '18, Stars
Lionel G. Crocker, '18, as Jack
Barthwick, the irresponsible son of
John Barthwick, M. P., starred in one
of the leading roles of the play as- the
spendthrift son of h-is rich, indulgent
parents. Harry A. Wellford, '18, as
a prototype of the well-known Eng-
lish butler, supplied the comedy ele-
ment of the play.
Mr. George D. Wilner, of the ora-
tory department, Hellen W. Sellew,
spec., and Herman A. August, '19, did
some fine acting in some of the less
important roles, while the entire cast
furnished splendid support through-
out the entire play. The staging and
costuming was fine and came up to
the acting of the players.!

(By The Associated Press)
London, May 24.-The British armed
merchant ship, Molaera, with Ameri-
can troops on board, has been torpedoed
and sunk, according to an official bul-
letin issued by the British admiralty.
56 Americans Missing
"The armed merchant cruiser, Mol-
aera, was torpedoed and sunk yester-
day morning," says the bulletin
''There were no casualties among the
crew, but 56 of the American troops
on board, up to the present, have not
been accounted for. It is feared that
they were killed by the explosion in
one compartment, close to the hole
where the torpedo plowedthrougah.
The Molaera . was torpedoed and"
sunk without warning. It was a moon-
light night, and although a good look-
out was kept, the periscope was not
sighted until the torpedo was on its
course of destruction.
Men in Iammocks
Most of the men on board were in
their hammocks when the explosion
occurred: The soldiers and sailors
showed no fear. When it was seen
that the Molaera was settling down,
all on board were taken off by the s-
corting ship. The men lost all their
belongings, which were supplied by
the naval forces.
The Molaera is a 9,500 draw, and
owned by the Oriental steamship nav-
igation company. She was built in
1903 and is 520 feet long.
Washington Hears Nes
Washington, May 24.-Sining of the
British merchant cruiser Molaera, with
a total loss of 56 American soldiers.
was announced in a cablegram re-
ceived tonight by the war department
from the British admiralty. The un
derstanding here was that the ship was
moving between England and France,
The war department authorizes this
statement:
"Information has been received from
London that the British armed mercb-
ant cruiser, Molaera, has been sunk,
and that 56 of the American sodlers
aboard are missing."
At a late hour, no further informa-
tion was received by the war depart-
ment to indicate what American units
were on board the vessel. Many men
are training in England, and it is pos-
sible that the Molaera was carrying
a contingent bound for the front.
CITY CIVIC ASSOCIATION
ELECTS OFFICERS FOR YEA
At the election of officers of the
Ann Arbor civic association last
night, the following officers were
elected: president, Charles F. Kyer;
vice-president, Dr. T. F. Langford;
treasurer, E. B. Manwaring; and sec-
retary, Mrs. Winona S. deValenzela.
All but the new president were re-
elected for the new term of offce
unanimously.
A motion was passed to make the
secreary .of the Ann Arbor civic as-
sociation the secretary of the local
food administration, in the face of
a certain drive to begin next week.
ITALIAN FLAG OCCUPIES PLACE
OF HONOR ABOVE POSTOFFIOE
Itly's flag was displayed at the
postoffice yesterday, occupying the
place of honor under the Stars and
Stripes, by special orders of the treas-
ury department, in observation of the
third anniversary of the entrance of
Italy into the war.
The postoflice lacked a flag to dis-
play, but obtained the loan of a very
handsome banner from Prof. Aubrey
Tealdi, of the forestry department, 01
the University.

Italian flags were also displayed
about the city in celebration of the
I----"

peakers will be picked fro
:ake part in the final co
held Tuesday night. The
meet at 6:30 o'clock th
hour before the contest b
pick their subjects by I
1 all be on the same phase

Oil

Liberty extemporaneous speak-
ntest is the first attempt at the
rsity to hold a large extempor-
s speaking contest and promi:es
an interesting experiment. No
sion will be charge to attend it.
R. Memorial Service on Sunday
.members of the Sarah Caswell
1 chapter of the D. A. R. are re-
d to assemble in the vestibule
Presbyterian church at 10
k May 26 for the purpose of at-
g, as an organization, memorial
es by invitation of the pastor,
L. A. Barrett.
rnlval Committee Needs Help
ty freshmen and sophomores are
d by the construction commit-
the Michigan Union carnival to
in Waterman and Barbour gym-
ns Monday and Tuesday after-
Volunteers for this work are
to sign up at once in the En-
ing society rooms or at the Un-

LIEUT. DREESE, EX-'19, HERE
TO INSPECT RADIO COURSE
Lieut. E. E. Dreese, ex-'19E, is in
Ann Arbor on a tour of inspection of
course in radio communication. He is
here to give special talks to the men
and has brought with him some spe-
cial apparatus of recent design.
The course offered in this univer-
sity has the largest enrollment of
any of the schools in this country
giving similar courses, there being 41
of these and our share of the total
enrollment being 10 percent. Lieut.
Dreese states that he finds our uni-
versity the best equipped of, any
which he has visited so far and he
believes our men are better trained in
code work and in military drill than
the men of any other school he has
visited.
Lieut. Dreese will be in Ann Arbor
until Monday. If there are any stu-
dents who would like to 'interview
him regarding radio communication
they'will be able to do so in Room
109, engineering building.

Alumna to Give Address on Advertising
"Advertising as a Vocation for Wo-
men," will be the subject of an address
by Hazel Whitaker, '06, of Detroit, at
4:15 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at
Newberry hall. Miss Whitaker, who is
at present employed in the advertis-
ing department of J. L. Hudson Co.
in Detroit, has had experience in so-,
cial service work, teaching, and
newspaper corresponding.

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