100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LRE

I

pif(w

±

Afr 3A t

Ar

DAY AND NIGHT 11
SERTICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 24, 1918.

PRICE T

T

5 QUOTA*i
BSCRIBEO1
SOLICITING

xI'0\S EX-
YNS O()I

IVE LOYAL
CAMPAIGN

HI of Many Interesting
lences on Volunteer
Days
r oversubscribed her Red
of $13,000 last night aft-
of "voluntary" contribu-
g to the great amount of
tail work connected with
m of the contributions, the
unt subscribed could not
The treasurer of the cam-
ed, however, that although
Mount was not known, the
had superseded the-
n Soliciting Today
of soliciting will begin
g when several hundred
licitors, under the super-
Illiam Schultz, city chair-]
nvass every house in th
s not display a "V" card.
of the committee to have
z in Ann Arbor subscribe
nal fund.
booths on the campus re-
cash contributions to the
$2,715.82 had been receiv-
dents and some members
y. This amount does not
pledges, as they were tab-
>ther committee. Officials
University has done "ad-
aiding to go "over the
Exceeds Expectations
eatly impressed with the
'ificial contributions," said
Cavendish, '18, in charge
rsity section of the cam-
amount of subscriptions
,n I ever expected. I think
ter part of the success of
due to the support of the
booths, and the Union
The boys from the Union
*e erecting of the booths
work that the girls were
) At no time were girls
i the booths." Miss Cav-
,hatshe visited each booth
y hour, and there' were

FRENCH AVIATORS
DOWN 97 AIRPLANES
With the French Army in France,
May 23. - Thirty-seven German air-
planes have been destroyed, 60 have
been forced to land, badly damaged,
within their own lines, and eight cap-
tive balloons have been destroyed by
French aviators since the weather be-
came favorable. In the period be-
tween May 15 and May 18 there were
105 aerial combats.,
American and Italian escadrilles
participated in the aerial operations.
On May 16 the work continued in
broad daylight, the bombing machines
being protected by 75 chaser air-
planes, which swept all the enemy
machines out of the sky in a large
area.
PREDICTS IS SUCCESS
FOR0 "THESILVER BOX"
TONIGHT'S CAST TO INCLUDE
FOREMOST CAMPUS
TALENTI
"I think the play will be a distinct
success," said Prof. R. D. T. Hollis-
ter, of the oratory department, yes-
terday, who is the director of "The
Silver Box," the play to be present-
ed at 8 o'clock tonight in Tjniversity
hall.
"'The Silver Box' contains many
opportunities for good acting and the
cast takes advantage of every single
one of them. It is a modern prob-
lem play and tells a story that is
worth while hearing in these days."
Final dress rehearsal was held last
night in University hall and the
smoothness and speed with which the
different acts were gone through por-
tends an excellent presentation.
Prof. Hollister Director
Professor Hollister has directed the
Oratorical association plays for more
than seven years. Among those
which he has helped to produce are
"The Tragedy of Nan," "Merry Wives
of Windsor,'' "Pillars of Society,"
"Servant in the House," "Riders to
the Sea," "Shadow. of the Glenn,"
"Land of Heart's Desire," "The Fan,"
and- "The Curious Mishap," the first
four of which are still remembered
for their achieved success. -Mr. S. J.
Spinner, of the oratory department,
is assisting Professor Hollister in the
direction of "The Silver Box."
Cast Experienced.
Almost all of the players who ap-
pear in the cast of "The Silver Box"
have previously acted in some play,
and an unusually large number of
them are highly reputed in dramatics,
having played leading roles in one or
more important plays. The complete
cast of players that will present
"The Silver Box" and the characters
they will take are:-
John Barthwick, Richard A. For-
sythe, '20; Mrs. Barthwick, La Vern
Ross, grad; Jack Barthwick, her son,
Lionel G. Crocker, '18; Mrs. Jones,
Gladys E. Greening, '18; Jones, Carl
L. Dahlstrom, '19; Marlow, Harry A.
Wellford, '18; Wheeler, Nona G. My-
ers,. '18; Unknown Lady, Mabel E.
Bannister, '19; Snow, Eugene Given,
'19; Roper, Herman A. August, '19;
Magistrate, Wilfred Nevue, '18; Land-
lady, Helen W. Sellew, spec; Two
little girls, Eva M. Bowen, '18, and
Lena M. Sackett, '18; Livens, Mr.
George. D. Wilner, of the oratory de-
partment; Relieving officer, Samuel
R. Rosenthal, '20; Clerk, M. L. Moses,

'20; Usher, John H. Hathaway, grad;
and spectators. Abigail Blackburn,
'18, Bernice L. Jones, '18, June L.
Brooks, '18; A. B. Parks, '18, Warren
C. Parmenter, '20, E. O. Brinkman,
'20, J. A. Krout, '18, and A. D. Mc-
Donald, '19.
Carl L. Dahlstrom, '19, is leaving
immediately after the play to enter
the national service.
PROF. H. C. ADAMS TO SPEAK
TODAY ON "WAR FINANCES"
"War Finance" will be the subject
of a talk to be given at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon by Professor Henry
Carter Adams, of the economics de-
partment, in the parlors of Barbour
gymnasium. This is a subject in
which everyone is interested today,
and Professor Adams is exceptionally
well informed on most topics con-
cerned with it.
The talk will be open to the general
nublie.

MEN MUST WORK
Law to Enable Drawing of Sufficient]
Force Necessary to Win the'
War
WILSON MAY CALL YOUTHS AS
QUICK AS CAN BE EQUIPPED
Provost Marshal's Regulations Aimed
At Idlers and Employees in
Non-Useful Industries

To Celebrate' Third Anniversary
Of Entrance Of Italy Into War
In accordance with President Wilson's proclamation, the third anni-
versary of Italy's entrance into the war will be observed at 8 o'clock this
Cvening in Lane hall. The Dante club, under whose auspices the celebration
is to be given, cordially invites public attendance.
The following program, arranged by Mr. Glen Hersman, will be of-
fered this evening:
The Dante Club ............................Roger Thomas, '18
Italian National Hymn .......... Ester Cristanelli, School of Music
Impressions of Italy During the War .........Prof. H. A. Sanders
o Sole Mio .................... .............. Ruth Cann, '18
Italy's Entry Into the War................... Prof.A. E. Boak
'L'Italia e la Cicilta......................Mr. Stephen Scatori
Lascia ch'io Pianga ............................ Ruth Avery, '18
America
In commemoration of Italy's entrance into the war, a message from
President Wilson to the Italian people was read Thursday night at a mass
meeting in Washington. As another great Austrian campaign against Italy
is impending, special significance is attached to the anniversary in official
and diplomatic circles.

Washington, May 23.-Two
ant steps were taken today
protecting the task of putting
tion on a war basis.

import-
toward
the na-

Soon after Provost Marshal General
Crowder had promulgated a drastic
amendment to the selective service
regulation requiring every man of
draft age to work or fight, Secretary
Baker appeared before the house mil-
itary committee and asked President
Wilson to be authorized to call to the
colors all men of draft age who can
be equipped and trained. The com-
mittee unanimously voted the author-
ity into the army appropriation bill
which is about to be reported to the
house.
[A w Made "To Win the War"
Under existing laws, power is given
to draft 1,000,000 fighting men. This
limit soon will be reached, with men
constantly going into camp to replace
those sailing for France. When the
law changes, the man power of the
country will be drawn upon with
whatever force that may be necessary
to win the war.
Provost Marshal General Crowder's
regulations is far reaching, it is hoped,
and touches not only habitual idlers,
but also requires that draft regis-
trants, now in occupations held to be
non-essential, must seek new jobs, or
take their places in the army.
"Non.Useful Jobs" Hard Hit
Clerks, in stores, waiters, bartend-
ers, employees at places of amuse-
ment, passenger elevator men, and
other employees around hotels and
clubs, as well as gamblers and fortune
tellers will fall into this class. *
Quips of Spring
Feature Gargoyle
Very appropriately after the long,
cold winter, comes the May issue of
the Gargoyle with pleasant thoughts
of spring and the countless joys that
the gladdest season of the year brings.
"Flowers That Bloom in the Spring,"
is the title of a unique double page
illustration of the things that invar-
iably mak their appearance in Ann
Arbor and on the campus at this rest-
less period of the year.
Thus with humor that is suggestive
of the' freshness of spring, the Gargoyle
merry-makers jest of spring initia-
tions, how prohibition is working out
in Michigan, and the thoughts of uni-
versity man and woman as they canoe
together on the Huron river. The
opinions of a number of students upon
the fairness of the recent Phi Beta
Kappa elections have also been col-
lected for this issue.
There is another excellent illustra-
tion of how the R. 0. T. C. boys are
expected to conduct themselves when
they meet the Germans, most of whom
have already been chased out of the
picture by the members of the form-
er organization.
TO DEDICATE NEW WORDE
CONGREGATIONAL ('IIURCi
Dedication of the new Worden Con-
gregational church, which has been
built to replace the one wrecked by
the cyclone on June 6, 1917, will be
held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday after-
noon. The Rev. Lorne Carter, pastor
of the church, will be in charge of
the services, and there will be ad-
dresses by the Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas,
the Rev. Ernest R. Latham, and the
Rev. Mr. Shannon, former pastor.
Harold Ristine will sing. Many peo-
ple from surrounding towns are ex-
pected to be present for the occa-
sion,
The church, though not as large as
the old one, is -more modern, and is
fully equipped for carrying on the
church and social work of the par-
ish. Commodious social rooms, in the

basement of the building, will be
dedicated at a banquet to be given
Tuesday evening.

MAY ESTABLISH -SCHOOL
FOR MUNITION MEN HERE
HICHIGAN ANM MASSACHUSETTS
TECH CONSIDERED BY WAR
DEPARTMENT
Establishment of additional schools
to train inspectors for government
munitions factories is being consider-
ed by the war department, and there
is a possibility that one may be es-
tablished at Michigan. The Board of
Regents, to whom the matter has been
referred semi-officially, will probably
make a preliminary decision in re-
gards to the proposed school at its
next meeting.
Two Possible Establishments
' Prof. Walter L. Badger, assistant
professor in the chemical engineering
department, has received a communi-
cation from Major A. E. White, form-
erly of the department, but now with
the ordnance corps, in which the pos-
sible establishment of two training
schools for inspectors was mentioned.
Major White said in the letter that the
two schools being considered were the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
and the University of Michigan. He ad-
vised the chemical engineering head
to lay the matter before the Board of
Regents, so that a possible estimate of
costs could be considered by that
body, should it wish to accept a train-
ing school contract.
Matter Before Regents
Professor Badger, in commenting on
the letter, said that the matter had
been laid before the Regents, but that
action awaited the Regents, meeting.
The chief difficulty in accepting such
a contract, were it offered to Mich-
igan, would be the question of secur-
ing suitable room and board accom-
modations for the men; The chemical
erngineering department, he said, has
a sufficiently large staff of instructors
to successfully carry out the teaching'
program. The possibility is that the
men who would take such a training
course would not be drafted or en-
listed men, but istead, civil service
employees.
Word has also been received from
Lieut.-Col. A. H. White, former head
of the chemical engineering depart-
ment, of the possible establishment of
training schools for munitions plant
inspectors. Lieutenant-Colonel White,
who is now in the ordnance depart-
ment, wrote that it would be en ex-
cellent plan fol- Michigan to attempt
to secure such a school.
NINE GIRLS INITIATE INTO
SENIOR HONORARY SOCIETY
Mortarboard, girls' honorary soci-
ety, held its annual initiation Wednes-
day night at Newberry hall. Nine in-
itiates were taken in.
A program of speaking followed the
formal ceremonies. Weltha Mac Laugh-

AUSTRIA WILL CONDUCT
CONFERENCE WITR POLES
CENTRAL POWER MAY BE ASKED
TO GUARANTEE INTEGRITY
OF POLAND
Amsterdam, May 23.-Extremee im-
portance is attached to a conference
to be held next month between Baron
Burian, the Austro-Hungarian for-
eign minister, and the leaders of the
Polish party, regarding the future at-
titude of the Poles in the Austrian
parliament. The Polish members, it
is indicated, will lay down three con-
ditions.
The first condition is a guarantee
of the integrity of Poland. Second,
a demand for the settlement, accord-
ing to Polish decrees, of the question
of the province of Cholm, along the
Polish border, which was awarded to
the Ukraine in the Prest-Litovsk
treaty, and which Poland desires to
reclaim. The third condition is a
stipulation that Galicia shall not be
divided. Whether the Poles can be
induced to support the government,
or will definitely join the opposition,
will depend upon the outcome of the
conference over these questions.
,r.r
Vive le C0a-eau,
The Nifty Hat
Straw Hat day is again with us.
Saturday, May 25, has been sele'ted
by our representatives from "Pana-
ma," as the day for us to be'deck our-
selves with that strip of "Alfalfa."
Our staid old seniors, jolly juniors,
and swarthy sophomores, will 1ll be
out wearing that two ounce "top
piece." The freshmen-Oh, yes, they
will be there, too, displaying the two-
ounce covering all right. But notice
the color, and the shape. We all hope
that "Old Sol" beams down upon us
with his most radiant smile.
HOLD ORATORICAL
ELECTIONS TODAY
All-campus election for officers of the
Oratorical association for the year
1918-19. will- be held from 10 to. 2
o'clock today at the flag pole.
The nominees to be voted for are:
For president, Herman A. August, '19,
Roy H. Fricken, '19, and John C. Cary,
'19; vice-president, Morris Paris, '19,
and Carl G. Brandt, '20; secretary,
Vera Andrus, '19, and Mabel E. Ban-]
nister, '19; treasurer, Herbert Parzen,
'19, and Webb R. Clark, '20. .
Women are eligible to vote upon
these nominees and the Oratorical as-
sociation is anxious to have as many
do so as possible.
NAMES OF FOUR MEN -FROM
MICHIGAN ON CASUALTY LIST

AWIT ORDERSH
BRITISH DESTROY GUN NES'
AVELUY WOOD; ENEMY
RAIDS REPULSED
HUNS CLAIM 3 U. S.
AIRPLANES BAGG
Internal Conditions in Austria
main Bad; General Foch hone
-Belgian Commander
(By Associated Press)
London, May 23. - Field Mar
Haig's report tonight says:
"Hostile raids were repulsed
loss during the night at Aveluy
south of Hebuterne. A German
tillery post in Aveluy wood was
tacked by a party of our troops,
the gun destroyed.
"A few prisoners, and a mac
gun, were captured last nght
French troops in raids north of
leul and east of Locre.','
Berlin, via London, May 23.-T
American airplanes were bro
down on the Lys battlefield ye
day, according to a statement is
by the war office today, which
that frequent attacks made by the
lies on the western bank of the E
were repulsed.
Feats of Yankees Win Pr'ais
Washington, May 23,-Exploits
American aviators, and the part
en by American soldiers in tr
skirmishes, have gained a'n ami
reputation for courage and reso
fulness Ambassador Sharpe repo
to the state department today.
said numerous references appe
in the Frenchm press of these cha
teristics.
(By Associated Press)
German preparations tor res
tion of their great offensive' along
western front are reported to y
been completed. Teuton legions
awaiting the command which
hurl them at the lines from w
they recoiled in the first two ir
operations of -the drive. Allied I
ers believe the German blow Wil
struck in a few days, and are a
ing with supreme confidence' the
of strength which may prove deci
In the meantime, only the arti
and aerial forces of the conteim
armies are showing great activit:
Increased Activity -at emm
Kemmel, and the line to the s
west of Ypres, is again marked
heavy bombardment, while fa
south, the guns continue to rm
The German official report men
frequent French infantry att
along the Avre, but these pro
were local operations.
In the air, however, the fig1
has seemed to grow in inter
American airmen have made t
appearance on the Lys battlefleld
cording to the German offirial re
This is the first time that Ame
aviators have been reported on
front, and it is probable that they
attached to the large body of
who recently reached positions or

British front.
Paris Air Raid Fails
The Germans have been at N
in raids behind the Allied lines.
Wednesday night a determined e
was made to reach Paris, but mo
the machines were driven off.
There has been 'some sharp figh
on the Italian front, but not of a
nificant character.
Internal conditions in Aus
which have been extremely cri
for some time, show little impi
ment, according to latest rep
There have been renewed riot
Prague in which anti-German s
were sung and cheers were giver
President Wilson.
Fights Break Out at Kiev
Serious fighting has broken ou
Kiev between troops commander
Gen. Skoiopauski, the self-style
man of the Ukraine, and the fo
which have remained faithful to
Rabbi, which was ousted by the
mans some time ago.

er of incidents connected
volunteer days" are an in-
the extreme spirit of sac-
ng Ann Arbor people. A
haired woman presented
fore one of the University
i deposited 98 pennies with
girls that she had saved
or this purpose. The work-
e campaign said that they
y justified in giving this wo-
card as peoplewho had
ributions of over $100.
hat well dressed man, upon
contribution of 50 cents at
campus booths was asked'
ubscription was not larger.
,s though the man was cap-
unteering more. The answer
was that he was deposting
amount at every booth in
Another case is teported of
er givng five war savings
r his share. He had saved
rder to be able to say that
ne his "bit." This was the
ting spirit and Miss Caven-
that the manner in which
scribed was remarkable.
[ECHANICAL ENGINEERS
FOUR-FIFTHS OF CLASS
cal engineers are not to be
the chemical men in num-
n in war service, according
. C. Anderson, of the engi-

i are left out of the
iors that commenced
ege term. In one of
rson's classes which
red 15 men, only two
answer the roll call.
ne remaining men are
alified for war serv-
aining four will be in

l
i
7
l
F
i
"

uin, '18, presided as toastmistress, and
responses were received from Ruth Washington, May 23. - The army
Bailey, '18, Alice Woessner, '18, and casualty list issued today contained
Helen Dailey, '19. In addition. Miss the names of 86 men. The list was
Agnes Wells ,gave an interesting talk.' divided as follows:
-------_Killed in action, 14; died of wounds,
Glee Club Serenades Sororities May 28 12; died of disease, 11; severely
The Glee club's annual serenade of wounded, 39; slightly wounded, 9;
sorority houses is to be given Tues- missing in action, 1.
day, May 2,, according .to Gordon C. The Michigan men contained in
Mack, '18, manager. The club is plan- the list were: Corp. Miles Douglas,
ning a new repertoire for the event. Rockford, died of wounds. Privates
Wartime 'songs and specialties will Frank Charles Mastenbrook, Grand
make the program somewhat differ- Haven, and Harold H. Neumann,
ent from those of past ,years. A mar- Glennie, died from disease. Private
tial tone will predominate, though the Martin Elenbass, Lucas, is listed as
program has not been announced. slightly wounded.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan