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May 23, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

th the winning run. One
, no error.
MICHIGANE

I G "

i

I

plate. No
led to cen-
g, Clark to
>sed out by
Adams fan-
ror.
: Garrett
of second
ned. Mraz
no hit, 1no

safe
ider.
left,
leted
not
the
Ones

Player A.B. R. .H. P.O. A. E.
Knode, ss ........3 0 0 4 3 0
Cooper,f .......4 1 1 2 0 0
Ohlmacher, rf ....4 0 1 3 1 0
Mraz, 3b.........4 2 2 0 2 1
Genebach, of .....2 0 1 2 0 0
Morrison, c.......4 0 .0 10 1 0
Garrett, 2b ......3 0 2 0 2 0
Adams, lb .......3 0 0 6 0 1
Saunders, p ......3 0 0 0 0 0
Totals......30 3 7 27 9 2
OHIO STATE
Player . A.B. R. H. P.O. A. E.
Metzger, rf ......4 0 0 0 0 0
Fogle, cf .........3 0 1 1 0 0
Fuller,lif ........4- 00 2 0 0
Fenner, ss .......4 0 0 1 4 0
Skelley, 3b ......4 0 1 1 0 0
Mann, lb.......3 1 1 14 0 0
Friedman, 2b .....3 1 1 1 4 1
Clark, c .........3 0 1 5 2 0
Fish, p..........3 0 0 0 3 0
Totals...... 31 2 5 *25 13 1
*One out when winning run scored.
Ohlmacher out, failing to touch sec-
ond.
Innings 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-R.1H. E.
Michigan .0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1-3 7 2
Ohio State0000000O20-2 5 1

Tea
M is
Illi
Oh
Io
Chi
vi
Pu:
Ind

Conference Baseball Standings
amI .Won Lost P'ctg.
chigan .............6 1 .857
nois ..............6 2 .750
io State ............2 2 .500
wa................ 2 .500
icago .............3 4 .428
sconsin...........1 3 .333
rdue ..............1 4 .200
liana .............0 4 .000

FOR UNIFORMITY OF
LINE OR TONE

led out for
ball was
s season.

State: Fuller
kied to Gene-
Skelley. No

Cushing's.-Adv.
Reliable Dealers Advertise in
Michigan Daily.-Adv.

singled to center
a Genebach's sac-
unded to Fenner
through with a
scoring. Garrett
as fanned for the
un, two hits, no

ig-Ohio State: Mann
Iman singled to center,
ield at, second. Clark
,cher but Mraz fumbled
and Mann and Friedman
ase. Adams fumbled
At peg an Fish's ground-
Friedman scoring. Metz-
d Fogle also struck out.
hit, two errors.
Friedman threw out
iode walked and stole
er grounded to Mann.
s called out on strikes.

Stolen bases, Knode, Cooper, 2; Gar-
rett; sacrifice hits, Genebach, 2; base
on balls, Saunders, 2; Fish, 2; struck
out, Saunders, 5; Fish,.5; winning
pitcher, Saunders; losing pitcher,
Fish.

i

ate: Fuller
out Fenner.
it was forced

singled to left.
d. Fuller made a
[orrison's fly. Gar-

Q
0

YESTERDAY'S GAMES
American League
Detroit, 3; Philadelphia, 1.
New York, 1; Chicago, 0; (14 in-
nings.)
St. Louis, 4; Washington, 2.
Cleveland-Boston game postponed,
cold and wet grounds.
National League
Chicago, 2; Brooklyn, 1.
Pittsburg, 6; Philadelphia,-5.
Boston, 3; Cincinnati, 2.
New York-St. Louis game postpon-
ed, rain.
CAPT. ARCHIE ROOSEVELT MAY
LOSE LEG OR ARM IN WOUND
Owosso, Mich., May 22.-Capt. Arch-
ie Roo'sevelt is so seriously wounded
that he may lose a leg or an arm, ac-
cording to a statement made here
Tuesday by Dr. M. D. Hardin, of Chi-
cago, recently returned from France.
Captain Roosevelt's wounds were re-
ported some time ago, but were be-
lieved slight.
Dr. Hardin, speaking for the Red
Cross, told of America's achievements
of construction in France. American
locomotives are being put into France
at the rate of eight a day, the speak-
er said.
COLLEGE MEN WANTED FOR SUM-
MER WORK
We are offering employment to col-
lege men, over 18 years of age, on
government work and regular commer-
cial lines. Our factory operates six
days a week, on three eight-hour'
shifts. While you are learning the
operation we pay you 35c an hour,
plus a 10 per cent bonus on all wages
for steady attendance, computed in
weekly periods. After learning the
work which takes from one to three
weeks, you are able to earn from $5
to $7 a day and better.
We refund railroad fare of $10 or
less in 30 days; from $10 to $20 in
60 days; from $20 to $30 in 90 days.
We have a housing bureau which will
assist the applicants In securing rooms
at the lowest rates.
Working conditions are the best.
Americans and foreigners do not work
together on the same basis.
A large athletic field is at your dis-
fosal.
Those of you who wish to come
should write a few days before you
expect, toarrive. Physical examina-
tion required.
For further information call on
or phone Carl E. Johnson, 1550 Wash-
tenaw, Agent for Goodyear Tire and
Rubbed Co., of Akron, Ohio. Phone
188, between 5-6 and 7-8, Tues.,
Thurs., and Fri.-Adv.

LINOSTROMMAKES N'HN-RN ER,
FOURTEEN TRACESTERS WILL
TAKE CHICAGO
TRIP
The best hand grenade record made
at Ferry field this year 'was made
yesterday afternoon by Lindstrom,
one of Steve's weight men. Lindstrom
made a total score of 26 out. of a
possible 45. His mark is only six
points less than the score which the
whole University of Minnesota gren-
ade team made to win the event in a
dual meet with Wisconsin two weeks
ago.
Coach Farrell has practically pick-
ed the squad he is to take to Chicago
to compete with the Windy City track
team. Steve said last night that he
will take 14 of his athletes, although
he may make some changes before
the anen depart for the meet Friday.
Yesterday's workout was rather
light as most of the squad took a
lay-off to see the Wolverine baseball
team defeat the Buckeyes. The prac-
tice this afternoon will be the last of
the week. All the athletes are in
good condition. Haigh and Captain
Donnelly are fast rounding into their
old time form, which means more
counters for the Maize and Blue.
Reports from the Maroon school
say that Coach Stagg's proteges are
oat to avenge the defeat the Wolver-
ines handed them inthe indoor meet,
when Michigan turned the Chicago-
ans back by a large score.
Reader Admires
Flowers At Game
Sporting Editor, The Michiga. Daily.
Dear Sir:
I saw what you said the other day
about people sticking to the ball games
until they was finished. I'm for it-
for most people. But when those
members of some guild or something
else feminine insist on sticking hats
etc. in front of those of us who would
enjoy the game otherwise, you and I
don't agree at all.
They told me after the game that
Ohlmacher threw someone out at the
plate on a dandy play. All I saw of
it was a 'waxed tulip on top of Mrs.
Brown's hat when she turned to wave
her hand to "that Mrs. Smith you know
who-."
The yelling was dandy. I heard
some of it over the conversation. And
every once in a while the female con-
gregation would sit down to rest and
then I would see that there were still
players on the field. I'll bet Mraz
looked funny scoring from second on
Garrett's hit in the ninth. I wish I
could have seen him.
I heard Morrison say once: "What
have you got to say out there." He
didn't need to holler anything like
that. They had lots to say anyway,
I want you, dear editor, to con-
gratulate the players for me. I would
have cheered' them had I only known
what they was doing. I surely "stuck
to the finish." I couldn't get out.
Understand me-I'm strong for go-
ing to these ball games. But honest
to Heaven, I prefer seeing them.
That's all I hope.
Your- .
Russki Krushok to Hear Prof. Frayer
Professor William A. Frayer of the
history department willspeak on the

Russian situation before the Russki
Krushok at their regular meeting at
4 o'clock Saturday in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. The subject of his talk
is the "Russian situation in its rela-
tion to European politics."
MR. BROWN
Offers men and women high-
est marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
of suits, overcoats, or shoes he will
take off your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no 'good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
them cheap. Their absolute value will
be paid., Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude Brown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will

Young Me

$1.50 White
Soft Collared I'U L
Shirts
$1.00 sP

Twenty-five 1918 Spring
priced remarkably low for qui

D
LLDOIR

$19.00

Here's a chance for 25
lows to save $6.00 on a c
wool suit.
Sizes 35 to 38

One lot
75c Silk
Men's Hose
2Pair for
$1.00

F. W. G-

17 degrees

309 SOUTH

I.
4.

0 1 --
,_li -

Evers
absolutely

TODAY IS

!lp

m~ler

L am'
rM7
i
i
u
0

Dc

The folio'
many bargains

SILK HOSE in black, wh-
and $1.50 values........ ..... .

women are planning vacation
do duty for many occasions,
omplements to light costumes.

2-CLASP SILK
GLOVES
in black, white and
$1.25 and $1.35
$1.00

Prompt'

4 yds.

Shop

Special lot of SATIN
CAMISOLES, . .$1.00
LEATHER SKINS
for table covers, $1.50
and $1.75 values,
$1.00
4 yds. 35c and 40c cre-
tonne in wide range of
colors .......... $1.00

2

Patronize a Daily advertiser once
S and you will patronize him again.-
Adv.

PI CES
und in our own shop,

I

III II

I I

np . shades, wor
at.......L

.4

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