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May 23, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1918.

_r

OYS

WOLVERINES BEAT
SOHIO BY ONE RUN

RED CROSS GETS
SOOO FIRST DAY

LAW SCHOOL LOSES
TWO FACULTY MEN

FLY

illiam .L. Phelps, of the
ment of Yale univer-
ver a lecture on the
g Reserve/' at 7:15
r evening in Hill audi-
of the lecture is to in-
between the ages of 16
iteer their services for
this summer. There
choice of jobs offered
r will receive the reg-
ges. Some will work
sand others will be
3 seen fit by them. The
in back of the move-
s to have every avail-
his services.
the age limit are ex-
d this lecture, as well
he vicinity who desire
lie summer. The boys
young to take active
r will in this manner
pporthunity of aiding

Last Conference Game to Be Played
here Won by 3 to 2
Score
GARRETT BRINGS IN PAIR OF
RUNS WITH TIMELY SINGLES
Ohimacher Makes Circuit Drive, But
Is Called Back for Failure to
Tag Second
In the last Conference game to be
played on Ferry field this season,
Michigan beat the Ohio State base-
ball team, 3 to 2 in a neck and neck
game, yesterday afternoon.
Three times there was need of a
bingle to bring in a Michigan run-
and twice Garrett came through,
while the other time Ohlmacher rose
to the occasion. But with the game
on ice, in the 'eighth, Adams and
Mraz made errors and let in the tie-
ing runs.
Saunders, with his hurling, Gar-
rett, Mraz and Ohlmacher, with their

3 PLAN
RAFT PROBE
AVIATION PRO-
BE INVEST-

University Girls in Charge of Booths
on Campus Collect
$1,:>00
HOPE TO FILL QUOTA WITH
VOLUNTARY SUBSCRIPTIONS
Number of Contributions by -Poor
Is Feature of
Drive'
Ann Arbor closed the first day of
the Red Cross war fund- campaign
with a total of more than $5,000. This
amount represents only cash contri-
butions, the pledges having not yet
been calculated. Ann Arbor's quota
for the week is $13,000.
Out of this, more than $1,500 has
been received by the four booths on
the campus. This does not include
all the faculty subscriptions, as the
number of pledges are not under the
supervision of the campus workers.
Girls Work in Booths
"It went splendidly. The girls were
in the booths all the time," said Vir-
ginia G. Cavendish, '18, of the School
of Music, in charge of the University
section of the drive, in commenting
on the results yesterday. The major-
ity of contributions are between $1
and $2 on the campus, although there
have been a number of $25 and $50
cash subscriptions from students.
The highest amount subscribed on
the campus yesterday was $100 by a
member of the faculty.
The booth. in U-hall is used exclu-
sively for pledges, while the other
booths are for cash contributions.
Another booth will be erected today
in the University library, in order
that every student may be able to
subscribe.

The Law school will lose two of
the most prominent and popular
members of its faculty at the close of
the academic year when Profs. Rob-
ert E. Bunker and John R. Rood
withdraw from the University. The
Regents at their April meeting ac-
cepted the resignation of Professor
Bunker and granted Professor Rood's
request for an indefinite leave of ab-
sence.
Professor Rood leaves for Detroit,
where he will practice, making a spe-
cialty of real property law, in which
he is an authority.
Both professor's have been mem-
bers of the faculty for a considerable
time, Professor Rood coming to the
Law school in 1898, and Professor
Bunker in 1901. Both graduated from
the Law school and returned to the
University after engaging in active
practice. Professor, Bunker graduat-
ed from the literary.college in 1872
and from the law school in 1880,
while professor Rood took his degree
from the Law school in 1891.

SECRECY GURD
VICTORY AT P

SPress)
2. - Attorney-
to the military
letter from1
at President
irecting the de-
investigation of
aying the de-
a parallel in-
ig to the attor-
rm the investi-
the entire his-
.ction since the
gone into, and
by a complete
covered regard-
rere found for

itude? sen-
as virtual-
n commit-
med whol-
I that in-
be left en-
justice.
dide
nsion

batting, and Garrett and Morrison
with their fielding, were the luminar-
ies of the fray.
Fish Is Effective
Fish, the Columbus school's pitch-
er, held the Wolverines to but two
hits in the first five innings, retiring
the batters one ,two, three, up to the
fourth. Lungdren's men had a poor
day at the bat, although they gather-
ed a total of seven bingles. The work
of the Ohio State twirler was far
from the brand put up by Hamilton,
and Klein, but he made the Michigan
batters fan the air, almost as often
as -did the two from Iowa and Illi-
nois.
The first run of the game came in
the sixth, after two men were out.
Cooper got on through an error and
stole second. Ohlmacher, who fol-
lowed Coop, after getting a part of
the ball six times came through with
a home run, scoring Cooper ahead of
him. Ohlie, however, failed to touch
second in transit, so his long hit went
for a single, and he himself was out,
ending the inning. Ohlmacher's hit
was one of the longest seen on Ferry
field this year.
Michigan Scores Again
The next inning Michigan again
scored. Mraz led off and singled, go-
ing to second on Genebach's bunt,
and coming home on Garrett's hit
over first. This with the run made
in the preceding inning seemed to
make the game safe for the Wolver-
ines, but the blow up in the eighth
tied the score.
The ninth was nearly a repetition
of the seventh. Mraz, again led off
and singled, going to second on Gen-
ebach's sacrifice. Garrett, who drove
out the hit that scored the second run
of the game, came up with two out.
Fish had pitched two balls and two
strikes when Tommy hit the ball on
the nose, driving it over short for a
clean hit, and scoring Mraz. Two
were out when the game ended.
Saunders Hurls Well
Saunders pitched an excellent game
for his second try in Conference base-
ball, allowing but five hits, one of
which was a scratch infield dribble,
and walking but two men. If it had-
n't been for the unfortunate eighth,
Dutch would have had a shut out to
his credit.
Tommy Garrett was the big star'
of the game, making two hits which
aided in the scoring of two of Mich-
igan's three runs and stopping one
of the Ohioans' rallies by going way
behind second for a fast drive, which
(Continued on Page Three)

I.

ittee of the American In-
ctuaries, appointed at the
the Carnegie Foundation
ancement of Teaching to
rious questions involved
lishment of the Teachers'
nd annuity association,
npleted its final report to
f trustees and forwarded
:enry S. Pritchett, presi-
Carnegie foundation.
nittee, of which Prof.
lover is the chairman, has
meetings during the last
lans considered were set
e advance proof of the
ual report; together with
he proposed charter, ta-
ium rates to be employed,
of policies of insurance
contracts proposed to be

Fills the Flag
Six hundred sixty-six dollars re-
sulted from the "Fill the flag," dur-
ing the parade, apd the returns from
the sale of' tickets on the colt and
calf were somewhat lower, a total of
$632 having been reported. These
with the $317 realized from the auc-
tion make up a considerable portion
of the amount received.
All voluntary subscriptions must
be in by tonight. The war prepared-
ness board wishes the people of the
city to understand clearly that they
must make their contributions to-
day, and have their voluntary cards
in the windows of their homes Fri-
day morning, in order to be passed
over in the general solicitation on
Friday and Saturday, when the sev-
eral hundred solicitors will canvass
the city. Every home that does not
display a "V" card will be entered,
and satisfactory reasons must be pre-
sented for failure to subscribe. The
fact that some student has a card in
his window will not excuse the house
from being entered by the solicitors.
Large Contributions in City Booths
In the city booths, several large
contributions have been reported by
individuals. There have been a num-
ber of $100 subscriptions, some $200
and $300 subscriptions, and one at
$400. The men at the tables were
kept busy all day writing out re-
ceipts. The number of volunteers
was so much greater than the num-
ber expected, that the supply of "V"
cards and Red Cross buttons ran out
in the early part of the afternoon.
Many Small Contributions
-Both the poor and the wealthy of
Ann Arbor are showing real sacri-
flical patriotism, as indicated by the
large and small contributions. De-
spite the fact that some of the sub-
scriptions aggregate even $400, 25
and 50 cent subscriptions were not
uncommon. One of the workers call-
ed up the city chairman of the drive
and asked him whether a woman who,
claims she can afford to volunteer
only 25 cents should be presented
with a "V" card. The answer was
that if that was all she was able to
give, she was doing as nobly as the
ones who were giving the larger
amounts. She was presented with a
card.
The war preparedness board hopes
that the, voluntary subscriptions shall
cover Ann Arbor's quota tomorrow,
so that soliciting will be made un-
necessary: Unless this is done, the

and the Merrimac at Sant
Plans were long made
mander Pellegaini who a
usual means of secrecy to
the project. To divert at
took service in the trenc
Piave, and when ready to
out that he was going to v
He was accompanied by
ficer and two sailors. Fin
tions were made for a das
Pellegaini, and his comp
on rubber suits, which co
flated. The plan was to d
pedoes at the big ship, the
their own craft, jumping
and risk capture or drow
realized that there was pra
chance of returning alive.

ITALIAN RAID ON,, AUSTRIAN
SHIPS EQUALS BRITISH AT
ZEEBRUGGE
(By the Associated Press)
Italian naval headquarters, May 18
(Delayed) - The details of the re-
cent Italian naval exploits at Pola
show that it was one of the most au-
dacious feats of the war, worthy to
rank with the British at Zeebrugge

card

'18 CHEM Es
ALL JOI

by

Almost 100 per cent fc
service will be the rec
chemical engineering c]
Of the original 39 mer
senior class, 20 have a
drafted, or are employed
and gove'rnment plants.
ing members of the class
to government service
they graduate. In this
tire class will be in th
Uncle Sam.
The chemical engine
have received reports fi
ernment school for me
metalography inspectors
institute, Pittsburgh, tha
gan men who were sent
struction May 1'are far
other students in 4_leir
Michigan men hav ma
showing, which will not
for some time, the repot

e rem
rill go

Car

The object of the proposed associa-
tion is to furnish insurance protec-'
tion and old age annuities to teach-
ers in the colleges and universities
of the United States and Canada. It
is expected that premium payments
will be made through the mutual co-
operation of the teachers, the educa-
tional institutions, and the Carnegie
Foundation. It is hoped that it will
be put into operation some time this
year.
Professor Glover has just returned
from Chicago, where the last meeting.

: sai

RE NAMES REPORTED IN
ARMY CASUALTY LIST
Uington, May 22. - The army
y list today contained 48

ANN ARBOR WILL CELEBRATE
ITALY'S ENTRANCE IN WAR
Italy's entrance into the war will
be celebrated by the people of Ann
Arbor and the students of the cam-
pus by a special program and enter-
tainment to be given at 7:30 o'clock'
Friday evening, May 24, this date be-
ing the aniversary of that event.
Mr. Glen Hersman will act as
chairman of the evening's program,
and Professor Charles McKenny,
president of the Ypsilanti State nor-
mal, will be the chief speakeir of the
evening. There will also be other
speeches and vocal and instrumental
selections given.
Everyone is invited to be present.
A complete program for the even-

t
<
i
t
y
c
t
,1
y

W. W. Bishop in New
W. W. Bishop, University i
is in New York on business
ing the Library.

*

*

* Engineers Assemble This Morning *
* Assemblies will be held in the *
* engineering college this morning *
* as follows: *
* Seniors at 10 o'clock-Speak- *
* er, Mr. John S. Worley, "Ethics *
* Applied to Public Service Cor- *
* porations." *
* Juniors at 9 o'clock-Speaker, *
* Prof. Arthur L. Cross, "Current *
* Political Situation in England." *
* Sophomores t 8 o'clock - *

Ya

privates'

the

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