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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 21, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I hI U
Ii
~PFIBL O

WE, DELIVER FLOWEIRS
to any address at the time required. You
can order a box or a bouquet here with
absolute confidence that the fair one
will receive your gift at the time you
direct. We sell only the freshest and

most perfect blossoms.
care they will keep. for
by phone if you want to.

With
days.

proper
Order

!LANDERS 213 E.LibertySt,
OR -.
LOWERS
GARAGE

5

PAR I NION FINANCED
Y AMERICANCOLLEGES
MORE THAN 100 UNIVERSITIES
HELP IN SUPPORTING
INSTITUTION
More than 100 universities and col-
leges in the United States, including
West Point and Annapolis, have now
officilly joined the American Univer-
sity Union .n Europe and contribute
to its financial support, according to
a bulletin issued by that organization
at its headquarters. In the United
States, the honorary patrons are the
secretary of war, and the secretary
of the navy, and, in Europe, the Am-
erican ambassadors to Great Britian,
France, and Italy, and General Persh-
ing.
Meets Demands of College Men
The work of the Union has been de-
veloped in entire accord with that of
the Amercian Red Cross and the Y.
M. C. A. its general object is "to
meet the needs of American university
and college men and their friends who
are in Europe for military or other
service in the cause of the Allies."
Its central headquarters are the Roy-
al Palace hotel, 8 Rue De Richelieu,
Paris, of which it has exclusive use,
and at which upward of 5,000 Amercian
college men have already been regis-
tered. The Union offers its privileges
to men of all colleges in the United
States, whether graduates or not.
London Branch Established
In September, 1917, through the ef-
forts of Messrs. Sheldon, Grant, and
Tweedy, and with the generous co-op-
eration of Mr. Henry King Smith, of
the Farmers' Loan and Trust company,
a London branch of the Union was
opened at 16 Pall 'Mall, East. About
200 American college men have al-
ready registered there. Through the
courtesy of the Farmers' Loan and
Trust company, the entire first floor
has noW been given over to the Un-
ion. A large writing and reading
room, plentifully supplied with Am-
erican newspapers and periodicals, to-
gjsher with a bureau of information
and registration, will be opened from
9:30 o'clock in the morning until 5 o'-
clock in the afternoon. A duplicate file
of all registrations in the Paris office
will be kept here. The office will be
in charge of, Prof. J. W. Cunliffe, of
Columbia university, who has been ap-
pointed director of the London branch
of the Union.
Special Rates to College Men
Excellent hotel arrangements have
been secured at reduced rates for all
American college men, at the St.
James' Palace hotel on Bury street.
This hotel is situated near Piccadilly
Circus and not far from the Union of-
flee. A large reading room and lounge
on the ground floor is reserved for
the exclusive use of members of the
Union. Rooms may also be had at
hotels near by under the same man-
agement. The restaurant of the St.
James' Palace hotel is open at spec-
ial rates to members of the Union
whether or not they occupy rooms.
Oxford and Cambridge universities
have appointed representative com-
mittees of hospitality to encourage
visits to them by American college
men. An unusual opportunity is .thus
given to see English universites un-
der the most favorable conditions.
Members of the American University
Union who wish to avail themselves
of the privilege may do so by arrange-
ment with the director of the London
branch.t

YALE PROFESSOR TO LECTURE
ON BOYS' WORKING RESERVE'
Prof. Wililam L. Phelps, of Yale un-!
iversity, will deliver a lecture at 7:15
next Monday evening in Hill auditor-
ium in behalf of the boys' working re-
serve.
The working reserve was organized
for boys who are too young to take
actual part in the war, but who de-
sire to help their elder brothers. By
joining the reserve they will get the
opportunity. They will be placed
either on farms or in factories, de-
pending upon their inclinations and

/ '

PHONE 1101

100 OPERATORS NOW ABROAD;
EXCHANGE MAINTAINED BACK
OF TRENCHES
Washington, May 20. - Since the
early days of the war women of the
allied countries have distinguished
themselves in various lines of war
work. Whether fighting shoulder to
shoulder with men in the Russian
"Battalion of Death;" driving ambul-
ances over shell-torn roads, nursing
in military hospitals, or performing a
thousand and one duties at home,
women have taken an important part.
However, there has been thrown
open a new field in which the Amer-
lean woman already has demonstrat-
ed her infinite resourcefulness, in-
nate versatility and racial capacit
for speedy, accurate work. The new
task is that of operating an Ameri-
can telephone exchange, often a short
distance behind the trenches in
France.
Telephone Assumes Importance
In modern warfare, the telephone
has assumed such importance that
frequently it ismreferred to as the
nerves of the army. It was not to
be expected that General Pershing's
expeditionary forces were to rely on
foreign system of telephone communi-
cation, abandoning the more expedi-
ent service which this nation, as a
pioneer in the field, had developed.
Accordingly, vast quantities -of tele-
phdne material were taken overseas
and installed by the Army Signal
Corps. During 1917 men operators
:and French women were 'used for the
work, but neither group was satisfac-
tory.
The great difficulty was procuring
operators, capable of speaking,, both
French and English, who were nec-
essary in order to maintain accurate
communication between the French
and American armies. In November,
last year, General Pershing called up-
on headquarters of the Signal Corps
to forward overseas as soon as possi-
ble a force of 100 trained oerators,
able to speak intelligently in both
tongues.
Applicants from U. S.
Believing it possible to obtain op-
erators with a command of both lan-
guages in parts of the continent where
there were large French populations,
an effort first was made to fill the
quota from the French pioneers of
Canada and Louisiana. "Want Ads"
were placed in the French-Canadian
papers, but from more than 300 ap-
plicants only six could be consider-
ed. Then the announcement was pub-
lished in newspapers of this country,
and from 2,400 applicants there were
procured 25 experienced operators
and 25 possible eligibles. At the pres-
ent time 7,600 applications have been
received, and from that list the first
group of 100 was selected and sent
across, 150 more are now in training
schools, and a reserve force of 400
more is on file.
TWENTY MICHIGAN MEN PASS
MATH EXAMS AT CAMP JACKSON
Twenty Michigan men, all candi-
dates for field artillery commissions,
are listed among the 480 who passed
the mathematics examination recent-
ly given at Camp Jackson, S. C. As a
result of their standings, these men
will be assigned to immediate duty
overseas. The Michigan men are as
follows:
Howard C. Reed, '12E, Fred R.
Sheridan, '13E, Leroy C. Johnson, '16,
Philip C. Lovejoy, '16, Laurence W.
Lamb, '17E, Harry L. W. Bowles, '17E,
George Walterhouse, '17E, Lynn W.
Fry, '17E, Edmund M. Brown, ex-'18E,

Waldo M. McKee, ex-'18E, Howard
Willard-Jones, ex-'18E, Alfred G. Mo-,
rency, ex-'18E, William G. Hogan, ex-
'18E, Lee 0. Case, ex-'18E, Joseph G.
Hall, ex-'18E, Carl A. Sorling, '18, Al-
len 0. Beach, ex-'19E, John R. Boers-"
ma, ex-'19E, W. Roscoe Tonkin, ex-
'19L, and Max F. Kuhlman, ex-'20E.
Professor Half Makes Northern Tour,
Prof. A. G. Hall is making a
tour of the northern part of the
Southern peninsula inspecting high
schools. He will also give extension
lectures at several places. He ex-
pects to return this week.

CUT FLOWERS

CORSAGES

FLOWERING PLANTS

FLORAL

Cousins & Hall v
PHONE 115 Members of Florists' Telegraph Delive

lug

h-

YOUR SPRING SU
will be carefully tailored of the i
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

111 S. TFIFPHI1NF

Us I LLLIE I IL UIIILU
MAKE GOOD IN FRANCE

Get. your Straw

GOLF SUITS

RIDING

We hale a full line of
Sailors and Panama

D. E. Grennai
The Custom Tailor 60
BUY
hoover Steel Ball

Straw Hats from $1.50 to

NOW

I,

Between the Theaters
Your Floral Nee
GIVEN SPECIAL ATTENTION BY US

FRESH

LANGUAGE
WANTED

PROFESSORS ARE
BY WAR DEPARTMENT

GEO. H. FISCI
312 National Bank Bldg.

3. Inc. A'," crs

YEAR

the follow-!

semster
-19, at

of
a'

Professors of languages to address
foreign audiences in this country in
their own tongue are being sought
by the war department, according to
a letter addressed to Frank Bacon,
'02, social director of the Union.
"We are asking the colleges to give
us the names of professors who can
address foreign audiences in their
own languages, and who will be glad
to do so," the letter states. "Any in-
formation you may send will be highly
appreciated. We should like to have,
an added word in regard to the loy-
alty of such individuals."
The request comes from the office
of D. C. Brewer, in charge of the for-
eign speaking soldier sub-section,
military intelligence branch.
PROFESSOR SI]NG PUBLISHES
NEW' ENGINEERING MANUAL
"Hand-book of Hydraulics," Prof.
Horace W. King's new manual of hy-
draulic engineering, is reviewed in the
current issue of the Engineering,
News-Record.
Professor King's book is the result
of several years' work in collecting
,material and contains several original
formulas developed by the author. The
reviewer, while offering a number of
suggestions and criticisms, says that
the work is "the most comprehensive
that has been issued on the subject."
Technology Exams Given June 25
Civil service examinations for the
position of wood technologist will be
held June 25, 1918, for men only. The
salary for these positions ranges be-
tween $1,800 and $3,000 a year. . '

'20;

muel Lapiport, '20;
oldberg, '20; report-
urnal, Lawrence H.
arian, Maurice L.
strative board, A. J.
Gornetzky, 19L, H.
id S. R. Rosenthal,
'Nathan Isaacs, of
x' school, will deliv-
'Legalism in Jewish
nal meeting of the
his semester to be
26. Professor Isaacs
n authority in jur-
ier fields of law and
iany articles on le-
the Michigan Law
law journals. ,

17 MICHIGAN MEN
DIE FOR COUNTRY
Although the United States has been
at war but little over a year the Un-
iversity has 17 gold stars in her flag
of honor. 'Some have died from dis-
ease, and some from accidents while
at training camps, while others have
been killed in action.
A list of the Michigan men who
have sacrificed their lives for the
cause, with the date of their death
an'd the manner in which they died is
as follows:
Spencer T. Alden, '13E, at Great
South Bay, L. I., while instructing at
the naval aviation school on May 24,
1918. Stanley R. Augspurger, '17A,
a private in the engineers corps, was
drowned on the Tuscania on Feb. 5,
1918. Horace P. Beale, '15, died of
pneumonia at Camp Dix on April 22,
1918. , Thomas C. Bechraft, '09L, lieu-
tenant of 21st battalion Canadians,
killed in action on April 17, 1917. Al-
fred W. Brake, '17E, at Cambridge,
Mass., on Feb. 17, 1918, while serving
in the radio department of the navy.
Gordon D. Cooke, '16E, while serving
as a second lieutenant at Fort Bliss.
Robert T. Gilmore, '91M, a captain in
the medical officers' reserve corps,
died from infection at Camp Green-
leaf, Ga., on Jan. 20, 1918. Carlton
G. Green, '18E, private in t.he signal
corps, died of meningitis at Camp
Jackson, on Feb. 24, 1918. Richard N.
Hall, '12E, killed in action while serv-
ing with the American ambulance ser-
vice in the Vosges mountains. Charles
W. Howell,'15E, died from empyerna
at Camp Lee, Va., on March 23, 1918.
Frederick 'W. Hough, '18, was killed in
action while flying on the French front
in March, 1918. Kenneth W. Koch,
'17E, a pharmacist's mate, died March
14, 1918, of diphtheria while at sea.
Frank A. Lewes, '16E, a second lieu-
tenant in the Royal Flying corps, kill-
ed in an accident on March 27, 1918,
at Montrose, Scotland. Donald E.
McKisson, '15E, an assistant instructor
in the radio department of the navy,
died of pneumonia, at Toledo on Dec.
28, 1917. George B. F. Monk, '13D,
was killed in action in France on Dec.
18, 1914, while in British service.
William Sears, '17E, died of pnue-
monia while instructing at the naval

that has

world

Neti
Sh

I M1
'Walir's
108 &

Sells the

Jm . r

Is~
RTfS

ability.
,Leave Copy All boys who are between the ages
at of 16 aAd 21 will be expected at this
Students' lecture, as well asi farmers of the
Supply Store vicinity who desire boy labor for the
summer.

EYES EXAM]
DRUGLESS METI
We can save you time at
R. C. Fuller, Opt
With Haler & Fuller, Stai
MR. BROWN
Offers men and won
est marketable prices
old clothes. Anything
of suits, overcoats, or she
take off your hands. Se
clothes. They are no go
I' can use them. You wi
money's worth. No quibb
them cheap. Their absolut
be paid. Men's and wome
both. Call Mr. Claude Bri
Ihoover Ave. Phone 2691.
gladly call at your residen

for
in

etbook contain-
sum of money,
please call 1460

EZSCILLANEOUS
SALESMAN-Don't pass up this op-
portunity to make big money during
the Summer and to obtain valuable
business experience. We have the
best seller of the year. Needed in
every home, office and factory. 100
per cent profit. A postal will bring
free particulars. Write: Milwau-
kee-Western Sales Co., 143 Fourth

Why .Delay Longer?
Just received a complete stock of beautiful'
VICTROLAS
Prices from $20.00 to $400.00
TERMS TO SUIT YOU
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

Free Exhibition

aviation school at Boston, Mass.
Feb. 19, 1918. William H. Wane

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