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October 18, 1917 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-18

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18, 1917.

a;

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FADE T

T E M C G N D I P am, ..'l

WHAT 9ARE.1FUTURE
French Athlete Discusses Post-Bellum
Status of Athletics and Gen-
ral Sports
PREDICTS ANTI-TEUTON STAND
IN INTERNATIONAL CONTESTS
Quotes President of U. S. F. S. A. on
Probable Resumption of Old
Olympic Games
(By Charles de Saint Cyr.)
Motoring, aviation, riding and driv-
ing, hunting, traveling, interest the
masses and have more followers.
Yet it is football, running, swim-
ming, lawn tennis, etc., in a word-
athletics-regulated by the U. S. F. S.
A., by far the most powerful federa-
tion in the world, which constitute the
fundamental basis of sports; it is to
them, more than to anything else, that
we look to fortify the human body. It
is athletics which are at one and the
same time the makers of physical en-
ergy, and the test masters of moral
energy. The question is of the high-
est importance; we shall refer to it
again several times. Today it is suf-
ficient for me as an introduction to
set down the fact.
What will be the morrow of this
past, already rich in hopes attained?
This is what we must ask ourselves
today,,when in all the branches of our
national activity, the formidable
events we are witnessing lead us to
make a sort of probable balance sheet
of the future. This is the anticipation
which I have discussed with Mr. Mich-
ael Gondinet, honorary president of
the Racing club of France and of the
U. S. F. S. A., whose by-laws he
drew up. * This double "honorary" title
does not, happily, mean in any way1
that Mr. Michel Gondinet has retired;
at all from from sporting circles.
Athletic Reawakeningc
"Athletics," he states, "will have a
magnificent reawakening. The war
will have served to show up theirr
value. The young people, those who7
are now at school, will have for their
seniors, the combatants of today, a
feeling of passionate aamiration. Thist
will incite the young ones to imitate,1

I . _ 1

or at least to try to imitate, these glor-
ious seniors,' and this imitation will
take on the only form which it is
probable will be available, namely,
sports and sporting contest. These
children will have grown up to the
noise of the battle, not of a far-off
battle, but of a nearby war. They
will have felt too much energy vibrat-
ing around them to be able to escape
feeling the imperious necessity of
manifesting their own. Thus, the war
will, in a way, have nourished sports,
and caused them to prosper."
Opposes Franco-German Matches
The question of the resumption of
international relations, which entirely
dominates that of the Olympic games,
was one which had to be raised. Mr.
Michel Gondinet, who always opposed
any Franco-German match, is very
concise:
"These relations, such as it had been
thought well to establish them, such
as the Olympic games had given them
an official stamp, cannot be resumed."
And my informant conjures up the
face of the universe of tomorrow:
"We shall take part in a sort of
renaissance and a new classification
of the peoples of the earth. For a long
time there will be, as it were, two
races of mankind and two worlds,
separted one from the other. Sports
will in nowise bring them together;
for sports require gentlemen- a very
fine English word which signifies a
very beautiful thing, for it personifies
honor and loyalty. Well, the nations
who have made, in the frightful man-
ner we know, the war of today, we
cannot consider these nations as na-
tions of gentlemen. But I would
gladly see the framework of the Olym-
pic games, reduced insofar as the num-
ber of nations taking part is concern-
ed, enlarged, and I hope that the
works of the spirit will be no longer
banished therefrom. Remember Olym-
pus! Such solemnities at certain pre
determined ceremonies would consti-
tute grandiose manifestat~lons in
which civilized mankind would appear
in his full physical and moral devel-
opment.
Lessons in French. Madame Bre-
mont-Alabaster. 723 S. Thayer St.
1471-M.-Adv.
Get her a big yellow "mum" beforet
the game at the Arcade Floral Shop.
Prices: 40c, 2 for 75c.-Adv.

IWAA.PLANS PROGRAM
OFEDIERSIFIED EVENTS
WOMEN TO GIVE DANCE 'AND'
CARNIVAL FOR SOLDIERS'
BENEFIT
A wienie roast, an all-campus dance
and a skating carnival, are some of the
events planned by the Women's ath-,
letic association for the coming sea-
son, at a meeting of the athletic board
held last Monday night in Barbour
gymnasium.
Phyllis Egglestone, '19, is in charge
of the roast, which will be given aft-
er one of the hockey games, and which
will be announced later. The dance
will be given within a few weeks, for
the purpose of raising fund to main-
tain suitable home conditions for Mich-
igan soldiers while off duty in France.
Miss Alice Evans, director, was of-
ficially authorized to inform Miss Kin-
ney, chairman of the A. C. A., that
the athletic association would gladly
undertake the organization of a skat-
ing carnival to assist in raising ad-
ditional funds.
Hockey has assumed a stand-still
status in the last few days. A few
seniors were out for practice Tues-
day, and more are expected to put in
an appearance as soon as weather
conditions improve. The schedule for
practice periods will be as follows:
Seniors, Monday ad Wednesday at
3:30 o'clock; juniors, Tuesday at 3:30
o'clock, and Wednesday at 2:30
o'clock; sophomores, Wednesday at
3:30 o'clock; freshmen, Thursday at'
3:30 o'clock. Class teams will be chos-
en before the end of next week. ;
Beulah Smith, '18, has been chosen,
women's basketball manager to suc-;
ceed Doris MacDonald, '19.
MICHIGANDEFEATS DETROIT
IN HARD FOUGHT CONTEST
(Continued from Page One.)
the whistle sounded the end of the
game. Score: Michigan, 14; Univer-
sity of Detroit, 3.
Lineup and summaries:
Michigan (14) Detroit (3)
Goetz............L.E......... Ellsner
Goodsell.........L.T...........Voss
Boyd .............L.G........ Bateson
Lambert..........C....... ....Kenny
Culver...........R.G....... Harwood
Weske...........R.T.........Hogan
Hanish........R.E..........Kane
Weston..........Q........Edwards
Froemke.........R.H..........Allen
Cohn.............L.H..... Fitzgerald
Wieman..........F.B...... Hendrian
Touchdowns-Wieman, Goetz.
Field goal-Allen.
Substitutions - Michigan: Cart
wright for Hanish, Lambert for Cul-
ver, Culver for Fortune, Lindstrom
for Goodsell, Genebach for Weston.
Detro4t: Eichenrode for Lauer for
Hendrian, Guiney for Fitzgerald,
Krentler for Guiney.
Referee-J. C. Holderness, Lehigh.
Umpire-Anthony Haines, Yale. Head
Linesman-Walter S. Kennedy, Chi-
cago. Time of quarters-15 minutes.

Hal omes Across
With Post Portem
By Hal Fitzgerald
The sports editor of this merry
sheet requested me to lighten the lab-
ors of the regulars Vy contributing
a !ew notes on Saturday's game Just
as I was leaving the Press building,
I ran into Cliff Sparks aal Tad Wie-

little cuss went and double crossed
her in scandalous fashion. I don't
suppose she'll speak to him again.
until he runs a couple of kickoffs
back over into the promised land or
boots a field goal from the 50-yard
line.
Someone in the press stand stated
that "Michigan was playing the old
army game." It's quite the style this.
year, anyway, and is being done on
both sides of the Atlantic.
Coach Yost is not as restless this
year as he has been in former seasons.
The coach only changed his seat 47
times, whereas in former years he has
always managed to break into thq
century column. He still talks to the
ESTABLISI

boys in earnest fashion between the
halves, though. Culver told me the
coach had learned a whole lot of new
words that he was using this year-
vigorous, strong ones, too. I've been
wondering since how Ward knew so
much about it.
During the course of the day I shook
the paw of Long John Edmunds. John
said he feared that he and Harry Tut-
hill were going to have a bad year.
Both used to break into the public
prints daily, but now their press agent
is gone. Pardee is in Allentown.
Jack always was a thoughtless kid.
Daily advertisers cater to Daily
readers.-Adv.

man.

I shook hands cordially with

Cliff and painfully with Tad Wieman.
He nearly broke the old' right wrist.
The Germans don't knw how lucky
they are. They ought to be glad Tad
isn't mixed up in this E .ropean brawl.
Tad looks bigger than ever. If he
ever gets mad, it won't be at me.
CliIf Sparks is also getting husk-
ier In fact, right now he must be ful-
ly one-half as big as Tad.
After passing sorrowfully through
the gate that requires fifty cents in
cold cash, I met Mr. Bartelme, and
bemoaned the fact I'd had to pay to
get in. "You were foolish to pay,"
he said. If Mr. Bartelme feels that
way about it, I'm inclined to believe
I was. The good gentleman shall re-
ceive a personal visit In his office
before I attend another game.
During the course of the festivities,
someone aimed a megaphone 'at the
press stand and announced, "Rye for
Hanish." I didn't know they were
serving it to the players on the field
this season. This is, indeed, a swift
age.
When they announced the result of
the world's series, the New York root-
ers yelled. I was among those that
remained silent, and I clutched feel-
ingly for the well-worn wallet.
Young Cliff Sparks is in high
disfavor at home. His mother
came down for that Cliff would
and bet a box of candy that Cliff would
score the first touchdown and then the

J

PHED 1818

CL O HING
MADISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET
NEW YORK
Telephone Murray Hill 8800

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HOTEL PONTCHARTRAIN, DFTROIT
To-day
October 18th
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for Fall
Sendjor Illustrated Catalogue

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"
°

P. G. BARTELME CLAIMS BALL
GAMES DRAW SMALLER CROWDS
"All games throughout the country
will not be as largely attended this
year as previous years," said P. G.
Bartelme, director of out-door ath-
letics.
Tickets for the Michigan-M. A. C.
game are on sale. The authorities be-
lieve that the crowd at the game Sat-
urday afternoon will not equal the
record of last fall.

iT F, RM

-- 11

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