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May 19, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AIV J

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IDAY A

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 19, 1918.

T NO
U. S.

LIMITS ON
WAR EFFORTS

BRI

New York, May 18. - To win the
war the United States is determined
. to set no restrictions on the number
of men to be sent to France, President
L Wilson declared here tonight in a
speech re-affirmingrthe purpose of
America to set no limit on its efforts.
NTY0 As many men will go overseas as
ships can be found to carry them, the
president said, after referring to
statements having been made that
5,000,000 should go.
TAR The United States, he said, would
not be diverted by insincere talk of
sented peace from the Teutonic powers.
of Their proposals, he declared, spring
from 'a desire to have a free hand in
the East.
"I intend to stand by Russia as well
,esxas France," he said.
annual Liberal giving to the Red Cross, the
"Car- president said, is every man's duty.
audi- One of the damning things against the
dience Germans, he said, is that they have
ion innot respected the Red Cross.
Referring to Russia the president
Signor said:
favor- "The helpless and unfriendly are
Shar- the very ones that need friends and
closely succor; and if any man in Germany
dits. thinks we are going to sacrifice any-;
adame body for our own sake, I tell them
n h-r now they are mistaken."

WOLVERINES WIN
Yeslerday's Yictoiy Places Michigan
Nearer Conference Title as
,ow- is Contender
RUZICKA PITCHES WINNING
BALL DESPITE LAME KNEE

Morrison's Three Base
Run That Maes
Safe

lit Scored
Battle

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7
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E DAME EASY
FOR TRACK TEAM

iRS WITH FOUR
EQUALS REC-
ORD'

as vocal Michigan's track team won a rather
er regis- easy victory over Notre Dame yester-1
i vibrant day, 86 1-2 to 48 1-2. Coach Farrell's
men took the lead in the first event of
e of ex- the afternoon, the 100 yard dash, when-
>rtrays a Johnson and Cook took first and sec-
with Don ond places, and from that time on they1
etic, and were never headed.
le which Johnson and Gilfallen each scored
20 points, Johnson winning first in the
100 yard dash, high and low hurdles,
e cannot and broad jump, while Gilfallen count-
the part ed in six events, with two firsts in the
illo. His shot put and discus, seconds in both
Toreador hurdles, and 220 yard dash, and a
s out all third in the high jump, Johnson did
Spanish not take part in the high jump, as the
Wolverines had the meet safe in hand
tg a min- when that event came around.
rile force Johnson Equals Dash\Record
No new records were set, although
Miss Ada Johnson's time in the 100 yard dash
tton, and equalled the mark made by Hahn and
eir parts Craig several years ago. A strong
intepre- wind blowing down the track, aided
the dash men, but kept down the time
in the distance events.
on of the Baker was beaten out in the shot
effect of put by Gilfallen. Steve's weight man
fning un- was not up to the form of last week's
and furn- inter-class meet, his best heave being
ound for a foot shorter than the Notre Dame
star's throw. Baker, however, showed
up well in the javelin throw, but had
'he Star to be content with second in the dis-
cus, being again defeated by Gilfallen
arry B. in this event.
sor Stan- Half Mile Close
I of Re- The half mile, although run in slow
time, furnished one of the closest
morating races of the day. Call started out in
ry of the the lead with Buell, Charley Stoll's
May Fes- successor, a few yards behind. The
two athletes kept this position until
the last hundred yards, when Buell
made a hard try to take the lead, but
the Notre Dame runner sprinted, and
finished a few inches ahead of the
CROSS Wolverine. Call also forced Captain
Donnelly into second place by his good
work in the mile.
AMNIA AT In the pole vault, Cross and Rade-
moacher finally broke their tie, Cross'
winning out at 11 feet. Both are cap-
able of going higher, but the high
wind sweeping across the field pre-
will speak vented the vaulters from clearing the
1 auditor- bar atr abetter height.
tic meet,- Later and Haigh were going good in
ting Red the field events. Later won first honors
county. in the hammer throw and high jump.
have been He created a surprise when he took
Tuscania first in the jump, beating out Gilfallen.
a 'U-boat, and Haigh, as his best work in that
e state as event had been at a height of about
5 1-2 feet. Haigh placed second in
nn Arbor three contests and third in another.
ted Cross Messner Improving
udent is In winning the 220 yard dash, Cook
emonstra- had little trouble, being 10 yards

Ruzicka saved the day for Michigan
by stepping in the box, when everyone
thought that he would be unable to
pitch for several days, and holding
the Iowans to two hits and no runs,
while Michigan managed to score
twice in spite of the excellent work of
Hamilton.
The Iowa city men showed excellent
sportsmanship by allowing Glenn and
Langenhan to run for Ruzicka, when
the husky sophomore managed to
reach first through an error by Lay-
ton, and again when Hamilton could
not find the-plate. Glenn, running for
Ruzy the first time, brought the first
run across, when Knode sacrificed,
Cooper singled, and Mraz reached first
on a error by Kremer. Cooper, who
was on second at the time, was caught
at the plate when trying to score on
the same play.
Morrison Triples
The other run for Michigan came in
the eight, when Ohlmacher singled,
but was thrown out at second 'vhen
Shorty Mraz tried to sacrifice, the lit-]
tle third baseman reaching first in
safety. A moment later after Gene-
bach had struck out, Morrison tripled
down the right field foul line. Had,
Smalley been a faster man, he could
have stretched the hit into a homer,
for the ball rolled nearly to the tennis
courts outside of the foul line.
Several chances to score were
thrown away by the Wolverines by the
lack of head work, either by the
coachers, or the runners themselves.
In the sixth Genebach doubled, and
reached third on Morrison's sacrifice
but Garrett and Adams both fell prey
of the prowess of the famed Hamilton.
Ruzicka Displays Nerve
Ruzicka's injury did -not effect his
box work in the least. The nervy sec-
ond year hurler tried to conceal his
limping, but otherwise, it would have
been impossible to tell that he had
anything wrong with him. In addi-
tion to striking out 12, Ed went after
two pop up flies and gathered them in
safely. The Corn state batters got
two singles in succession in the third
but, these were the only two times
they were able to connect.
Garrett and Knode were both re-
sponsible for turning a couple of pro-
mising bingles into putouts, Ken going
behind second, and picking up a
grounder that the visitors were betting
on for a single.
In addition to the double and triple
Mraz, Cooper and Ohlmacher each
singled. The rest of the Wolverine
clan+ that reached bases, did not get
there through their ability to handle
the bat.
Hawkeyes Threaten to Score
Iowa threatened in the second and
again in the seventh,, but Ruzy spoil-
their hopes by the strikeout method.
In the second, Hamilton walked, and
went second when Olson hit to Gar-
ret, and Tomriny threw badly. The
next man up, Parrett, bunted to Ruz-
(Continued on Page Six).

FO 9 L -R 9[IN RAIDON YAN KS
Heavy Losses Inflicted on Germans in
Hand toTi mdGrenade Fight
with Americans
AUSTRIAN TROOPS FAIL TO
RE-CAPTURE MONTE CORNO
Mutiny Reported Among Hun Regi-
ments at Wesemberg Esthonua;
Several Officers Killed
(By Associated Press)
With the American army in France,
May 18. - The Germans attempted
a vigorous silent raid on one of the
American combat groups within a
strong point within the Luneville sec-
tor, but were badly beaten. The raid
was ay complete failure and cost the
enemy considerable losses. None of
the Americans are missing. The fight
was carried on with hand grenades,:
rifles and revolvers, and it was vir-
tually hand to hand. The Germans
beat a hasty-retreat after 10 minutes
carrying virtually all their dead and
wounded with them.
Rome, May 18. - A third attempt
by the Austrians to re-capture Monte
Corno has failed according to the of-
ficial communication from general
headquarters today.
Shoot Down Airplanes
Berlin, via London, May 18. - Great
reconnoitering activity along the
western battle front has led to violent
hand to hand fighting, especially in
the district of Lassigny, according to
the official statement issued by the
war office today, which says that on
Friday, May 17, Allied airplanes and
one captive balloon were shot down
by the Germans.

WILL CALL NAVAL
RESERVE MEN SOON
Members of the naval reserve will
soon be called to active duty, accord-
ing to a telegram received from the
commandant at the Great Lakes train-
ing station by the military authorities
yesterday afternoon. This will pro-
hibit cadets in the naval reserve, who
have been recommended for the train-
ing camp at Fort Sheridan, from at-
tending the camp this summer.
Naval enlisted reserve corps men,
who applied for membership in the
Fort Sheridan camp, should report to-
morrow to Lieut. Losey J. Williams,
room 202, Natural Science building.
Men will be chosen from the alternate
list to take the places of the men
eliminated by this order.
FRESHMEN WIN GAMES
BY YESTERDA'S VICTORY
SOPHOMORES WIN ONE RACE;
LOSE REMAINING CON-
TESTS

TENET)
KI LS
TERRIFIC BI
HALF Ml
OF
AETNA Cf

Moscow, May 18. - Mutiny is re-'
reported among German regiments at.
Wesemberg Esthonia. Several officers
have been killed, it is said.
Germans to Renew Offensive
Nearly three weeks have passed
since the German offensive began on
March 21, died down -at its final ac-
tive point in futile assaults on the
Flanders front. Every indication,
however, points to the probability
that the coming week will witness its
renewal.
The Entente Allied staff appear con-
vinced that the enemy has about com-
pleted his re-organization and is only
waiting weather suitable to his pur-
poses to strike his new blow.
Irish 'QIestion
German public opinon is being pre-
pared by Chancellor Von Hertling and
others for the imminence of renewed
fighting.
In Great Britain the Irish question
looms larger again with the announc-
ed discovery of a "treasonable con-
spiracy with the German enemy" on
the part of certain Irishmen, and the
making of hundreds of arrests in Ire-
land. The prisoners taken into cus-
tody, were mostly members of the Sinn
Fein organization.

Property Loss
Chemicals '

'---7
1
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'i
i

By winning all of the underclass
games held this morning on Ferry
field, the freshmen returned victorious
in the spring games by a' score of 4
to 2 after having been defeated by the
sophomores yesterday in the majortly
of the tug-o'-war contests.
All of the games were hotly con-
tested and, with the exception of the
rope contest, which was easy for 'the
first year men by reason of their over-
whelming numbers, the freshmen took
them only after a hard struggle.
In the obstacle races, the yearlings,'
after losing the first race, staged a
remarkable "come back" and took the
next two, receiving one point toward
the entire total of six points for the
spring games for doing so.
Cane Spree
Nineteen men paired up in the cane
spree and at the end of 15 minutes,
the two classes were tied for victory,
with seven canes in the sophomores'
possession and seven owned by the
freshmen. The contest was allowed
to go on five minutes longer, during
which time the first year men wrested
away four canes while the second year
men could get only two.
Rope Contest
The rope contest went to the fresh-
men easily. When the classes lined
up for the contest, the number of men
was about three to one in favor of the
class of '21. After the contest had
been stopped, 173 freshmen were on
the rope, while only 58 '20 men had
succeeded in maintaining themselves
there. This was largely due to a
squadron of sophomores that appeared
from behind the grandstand where
they had concealed themselves during
the first part of the contest and charg-
ed one end of the rope, placing several
men along it, but being stopped by the
mass of freshmen before they could
proceed very far.
Several hundred spectators were
lined alone the edge of the contest

Pittsburg, May 18. -
men were killed toda
plosion of T. N. T.
plant of the Aetna chE
at Oakdale, 16 miles fi
Five hundred workn
plant when at noon
slion was heard from
They knew its deadly
one man they rushed
exit. Before they could
however, the very air I
into flame and with a
beard for miles the Io:
ings were hurled into t
with them equipment
men. A great cloud of
settled over the scene
deadly fumes, torn and
dropped to the earth,
others to meet their
debris.

The number
determined toni
that it will not
indeed it ever v
of the injured,
found as far a
the remnants c
brought to Pitts
cial trains. TI
estimated at $1,
Immediately a

blaze while the hi,
chemicals added an
flames.
Bodies Conso
Throughout the a
burned. Each suc
reduced the blazin
and chemicals were
Soon after 6 o'clc
louder and more
away the remnant
practically cleared
face. Many bodies
flames, the authorit

the e

as might be

HUNS' SURRENDER
CHANCE DROPPI:
London, May 18. -
German force of 3,00
Africa was due to tt
ping of a number of b
ish airman, according
m rr ┬źn ~ihns

Troops in France Increasing
Washington, May 18. - With every
indication pointing to the early re-
(Continued on Page Six)

grounds to watch the underclass tuas. L o
sles. After the games, the victorious out
freshmen, 500 strong marched up the
State street with the rope that had to
been used in the rope contest and had his
their pictures taken in front of Hill mac
auditorium. cho
-__ _ _ _'_all

and

MISS HELEN FRAZER
Women's Part in Winning the War"
MONDAY, P. M., 8 o'clock
Changed from 8t15
NEW SCIENCE AUDITORIUM
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division

MICHIGAN FAVORITE
IN BIG TEN MEET
Chicago, May 18. - Athletic stars
from 18 middle west universities and
colleges will compete in the annual
.outdoor track and field championship
meet of the Big Ten conferenceon the
University of Chicago field June 8.
The entry list closed tonight with a
total of 388 individual standards.
Trials in five events will be held on
Friday, June 7, and the finals on the
following afternoon.
University of Michigan, with a well
balanced team, is regarded as the fav.
orite.
U. of C. Dismisses German Professor
Because of "an unsatisfactory atti-
tude toward, the war," Dr. Hermann
Julius Weber, associate professor of
German in the university of Califor-
nia, was dismissed. from the faculty
last Friday by the president of that

at the time
Von Lettov
sions was
thinking a
must be se
vertei his
long bumpo
"Ultimat
strong; sur

in A

10:30 A.M.

"Love's Great Sacrifice"

11

st c

I,

Sermon by LEONARD A. BARRETT
Noon Bible Class-Prof. T. E. R ank
6:30-Young People's Evening Servi

in 1

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