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May 18, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ThE NJCHIGAN DAILY

1

TO REGISTER *
'ATE ENGINEERS
de registration of engineers
licensing of those competent
ce their profession is the ul- *
al of a campaign inaugurated
ichigan Society of Engineers. *
larence T. Johnston, of the en-
college, heads the commit-
arge of the movement, which *
sent striving only for the reg- .
of civil engineers. To this *
atement has been drafted for *
e to be presented to the state r
re next winter. This meas-
ich calls for compulsory lie- *
f all civil engineers in the *
now being circulated among
3 of the Michigan Society of
s, and corrections and amend- *
e being added. *
engineering profession is the *
>ortant profession that is not *
I by law," said Professor *
i yesterday. "Doctors, law-:
d even plumbers and steam-
re compelled to fulfill certain
nentsabefore being allowed to
but under present conditions,
can pass himself off on thet
s an engineer."
dea is not original with the
i society, according to Profes- a
zston, for other states have al w
assed laws dealing more or w
roughly with the quetsion. t
o has a limited registration t
ile in Illinois, the licensing of o
etural engineers is necessary. h
.g and Louisiana have also s
ilmilar measures."
ssor Johnston himself has &
ip engineers' registration laws
e of the western states. P
hoped by members of the so-
at the registration law for civil n
rs, if passed by the legislature, b
but the beginning of the move- i
;he latest styles in personalr
cards at James Foster Houser
-Adv.a

* * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE THEATERS :

UNIVERSITY TO U UIN
8IG RED CROSS DRIVEJ

I I

I CITYNEWSj

Choice fits From
College Exchanges

I

Y

"The Naughty Wife," at the
Garrick.

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TODAY
Majestic - "A Pair of Sixes,"
played by Taylor Holmes.

D
7

Wuerth --William Russell In
"The Great Stanley Secret." Also
news and comedy, "Hello Teacher."
Orpheum-Bessie Love in "The
Great Adventure." Also news and
comedy.
Arcade-Seven reels of govern-
ment pictures to show the pro-
gress of our preparations to aid
our allies.

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Ty
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* * *' * * * * * * * * *
AT THE MAJESTIC
"The old era of press agents seems
to be going out," remarked Taylor
[olmes one day, between scenes of
A Pair of Sixes." "The old timer was
regular Munchausen as far as facts
were concerned. I recall one fellow
with a glib imagination and a little in-
oxication, who sent out a story to
he effect that " I studied for grand
opera. And a week or so later, when
he sobered up, he wrote that I was
tone-deaf." Taylor Holmes plays in
"A Pair of Sixes," at the Majestic to-
day.
Postal Employees Get Pay Increase
Washington, May 17.-An amend-
ment to the postoffice appropriation
bill providing for an increase of $200
in the salaries of clerks, letter car-
riers and certain other postal em-
ployees, and increase of 20 per cent for
rural mail carriers, and for employees
receiving less than $800 a year was
adopted late today by the senate.

(Continued From Page One)
Abner Larned, a survivor of the
torpedoed Tuscania, and famous
throughout the state as an orator, will
deliver. an address at 7:30 o'clock
Sunday night in Hill auditorium. The
Washtenaw county war preparedness
committee expects that a large num-
ber of people will be present, in order
to further the number of voluntary
subscriptions.
Opens Booths on Campus
The work of receiving contributions
will be started the day following the
parade. The booths on the campus,
under the management of University
girls, will be open from 7:30 o'clock
in the morning until 6 o'clock in the
evening so that every student will be
able to subscribe while going to his
classes. The girls will be dressed in
Red Cross costumes, and two of them
are expected to be in the booths at
all time to take care of the subscrip-
tions. The booths will be open Wed-
nesday and Thursday, and will be
managed entirely by junior and senior
girls.
For each subscription of satisfactory
amount, a "voluntary contributor's'
card, to be hung in windows, will b
given by the committee, in additior
to the Red Cross button. Each care
will contain a large "V" with a re&
cross in the opening of the "V." Th(
possession of the card will mean tha
the owner has made a gift that is be
lieved to be in accordance with his of
her means. In addition to this, badge;
will be presented to voluntary sub
scribers, to be worn on the coat wit]
the button. Each badge will also con
tain a "V", representing volunteer.
Solicitors To Canvass
Following the close of the two vol
unteer days of the campaign, Re
Cross solicitors, under the direction o
William Schultz, city chairman, wil
canvass every house in the city tha
" does not display a "V" card. Mi
Schultz said that the captains an
lieutenants were already appointee
There are more than 360 men soli
citors, and an equal number of women
Tickets for the winning of the sma
bull calf and "handsome" colt, give
to the war preparedness committe
for the Red Cross benefit, have bee
distributed throughout the campu
and are now being placed on sale. i
is already reported that a larg
amount has been made through th
sale of the tickets. Because of th
fact that the government does not uz
any of the money received in th
Red Cross drive for local expense;
it was found necessary to find som
other means of raising funds. Th
money made from the tickets will 1
used entirely for paying the expense
of the campaign.

County Food Administrator A. D.
Groves has received orders from Fed-
eral Food Administrator G. A. Prescott
that all manufacturers who use sugar,
exceptin, hotels,restaurants,bakries and
boarding houses, must obtain a certi-
ficate from the food administrator dur-
ing the months of May and June. The
manufacturer must also file with the
administrator a sworn statement as
to the amount that he is going to use.
Judge George W. Sample has issued
an injunction in the circuit court
against Daniel J. Jeanerett of the
city cartage company. The injunction
restrains him from disposing of any
of his property or infrfering with
Mrs. Jeanerett's personal affairs. He
is unable to draw out any money in
the bank belonging to the City Cart-
age company until a decision in the
case is reached.

Dean F. W. Blackmar, of the Uni-
versity of Kansas, has been made a
member of a committee to organize a
lea g ute for constructive immigration
legslatin to recommend federal laws
which shall more adequatelyrcontrol
immigration.

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y
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Judge George Sample handed down
a decision dissolving the temporary in-
junction, granted against the Ann Ar-
bor Railroad company and Abraham
D. Budd, for the Washtenaw Mutual
Life Insurance.
U. S. CALLS FOR MORE
MERCHANT MARINES

A DePauw University army unit and
military department under the direct-
on of a commissioned officer of the
Unitel States army, deailed by the
war department will be formed next
ear as soon as college opens.
The faculty of the University of
Wisconsin voted last week to issue a
'war certificate" to each alumnus or
ormer student of the university who
has entered military service in the
present war. It has already provided
for graduating with a "war diploma"
all seniors who enlist, and for giving
the certificates to all who enlist who
are below the rank of senior,
The class of 1918 at Princeton has
decided this year to return to the old
custom of memorial pledge cards for
the raising of the senior class mem-
orial, instead of the insurance method
employed by the graduating classes of
the past few years. The absence of
so large a part of the senior class
has made this plan expedient, for it
will be easier for men in the ser-
vice to sign pledge cards than to take
out a separate insurance.
The University of Wisconsin has
been officially cleared of all implica-
tions or charges of disloyalty, as made
recently by Robert McNutt McElroy,
by a visit from S. Stanwood Menken,
president of the National Security.
league, who made the trip from New
York expressly for the purpose of
investigating the charges made by Mc-
Elroy, educational director of the
league.

ei
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n
V
P
b
F
LY

MR. BROWN
Offers men. and women high
est- marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
of suits, overcoats, or shoes he will
take off your hands. Sell your old
clothes. They are no good to you.
I can use them. You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
them cheap. Their absolute value will
paid. Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude Brown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will
gladly call at your residence.-Adv.

Wed. a OR K 50C to
MatiReeK Nights
and Sat. DETRO $2.50
4<The Naught Wife
with
CHARLES CHERRY and BLANCH YURKA
ARCADE
SHOWS AT 3:00, 6:30,'8:00, 9:30
tsc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Sat-8-'he Government uses Tlhe Ar-
cade today to show the progress of
preparations to aid our Alies. Seven
reels of fine pictures. The Govern-
ment's net profits constitute a fund
to help dependent widows and orph-
ans. Shows: 10 iA. M., 3, 6:30, 8,
9:3o P. M. Adults, 2$C; Children,
Mon-o-May Allison in "Social Hypo-
crites" and )rew Comedy, "Gas
Logic."
Pa na!ma
'Hats

,.

-N
FR ATER NITI ES

1

Arrange for Your
GROUP PHOTOGRAPHS

Unsurpassed Accommodations

)NE 948-W

619 E. LIBERTY

New Skirts

hite Gabardines

j

White Satins

White Pussy Willow Taffetas

hite Tub Novelties

White Poplins

Silk Poplins Radium Satins
Striped, Plaid and Plain Taffetas'-
Blue-and-White Foulards

vy Blue Seres

Wool Poplins

UNSKILLED LABOR HINDERS
CONSTRUCTION OF LIBRARY
Progress in the construction of'the
Library building is being greatly
hindered by a shortage of unskilled
labor. The contractors state that they
are able to find all the skilled work-
men that are needed, but that they
need a number of day-laborers.
Elaborate patterns are now being
put into place on the walls around the
front and side of the new building.
These patterns are assembled in the
basement of the building, and are then
laced on the wall in blocks. It is ex-
pected that the outside of the build-
ing with the exception of the roof,
will soon be finished.
Workmen have already begin con-
struction of the roof, and are now put-
ting on the "high-ribs," preparatory
to laying the concrete. The pouring
of the concrete will be very difficult,.
as this must be done entirely by hand.
'this faultfitalaying CkIT. m ETAO A
According to architects, this kind of
,roofis fireproof, 'and keeps the build-
ing cool in summer and warm in win-
ter. The roof will be covered with
red tile later.
Foresters Will Hold Last Meeting
The last meeting of the Forestry
club for this semester will be held
next Wednesday evening in room 215
of the Natural Science building. Prof.
Filibert Roth, the head of the forestry
department, will probably be the
speaker for the occasion.
Meiorah Society to Elect Officers
Menorah members in good standing
will meet at 8 o'clock tomorrow night
in Newberry hall to elect officers for
the ensuing year. The program for
next year will be discussed at this
meeting.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

Washington, May 17.-The sea is
calling again to American youth.
As the new ships of the merchant
marine glide down the ways, the need
for men grows more pressing. Abund-I
ant opportunity to aid in winning thet
war is offered the crews of the new
vessels, with the centainty that when
peace come, there will be further ad-l
venture and good pay in earring Ame-
rican commerce throughout the world.
Recruiting of the boys and men who1
must go down to the sea if America
is to regain her old place among the;
maritime nations is in the hands of
the Shipping Board's enlistment ser-
vice, headed by Henry'Howard, with
headquarters at Boston, who has out-
lined to union men and steamship
companies what already has been ac-
complished.
"About a year ago we realized the
shortage that was to arise when the
new fleet was finished," Mr. Howard
said, "and we started the training of
officers, both deck and engineer. We
established a train of schools extend-
ing along the Atlantic coast, the Gulf
'of Mexico, the Pacific coast and the
Great Lakes, to enable us to get hold
of the men who had experience at
sea. We then got the cooperation of
the steamboat inspection service. No
man was admitted to our schools for
officers unless he could first qualify
for experience required by the rules
of the steamboat inspection service.
That obviated the training of any dead
material.
"We have turned out officers so fast
that a great many have not been find-
ing positions in the merchant marine,
and have gone into the navy. It has
been, to a certain extent, a short cut
to a commission in the navy."
LOCAL MERCHANTS
OPEN STAMP DRIVE
The downtown merchants' thrift
stamn committee opens its drive today.
Complete plans of organization were
made at a meeting held last night at
'the city Y. M. C. A. which was attend-
ed by 60 business men of the city.
Committees of two were appointed
to cover each block of the city in the
present drive. The campaign will be
conducted on a competitive plan, a
great deal of rivalry already having
been displayed by the various com-
mittees. Nate Stanger, chairman of
the committee, expressed himself last
night as being cnfident that Ann Ar-
bor's quota in the war saving and
thrift stamp campaign would be filled
despite the fact that Michigan is still
the 47th state in the Union in lite
amount sold.
The Masons of this city are arrang-
ing for a series of open air meetings
similar to those held here last week.
The first of those to be conducted by
this organization will be held tonight
at the court house, plans for which
have not yet been completed.
American Steamer Neches Sunk
Washington, May 17.-The American
steamer Neches, a cargo carrier of 7,-
175 tons,'was torpedoed and sunk on
the night of, May 14 or, in the early
hours of May 15 without loss of life,
the navy department announced today.
Gasoline 25c, Polarine 55c. Staebler
& Co., 117 So. Ashley St.-Adv.

Glenn Price, of Waco, Texas, now
in an aviation corps in France, cabled
to a florist in Waco to send flowers to
his mother for "Motherg Day."
Health Service Changes Schedule
Owing to a marked decrease in the
number of students coming to the Un-
iversity health service for treatment,
the health service will be open only
from 9 to 12 o'clock in the morning,
beginning next Monday. Treatment
will be given in the afternoon only
in special cases and by appointment.
Cases of lung affections have fallen off
decidedly, and medical examination
of the reservists, has been the chief
work of the health service.
Only three students are in the hos-
pitals at present. This is considered
a very low number. The health ser-
vice is preparing for. a large number
of minor bruises and sprains which al-
ways result from the spring games.
Instrucor Leaves for Service
H. J. Andrews, instructor in fores-
try, will leave next week for the avia-
tion school at Ithica, where he will
receive his ground training to become
an aviator. Mr. Andrews was accep-
ted for service last November but
only recently received orders to re-
port for training. He met his classes
for the last time yesterday.
3 Senior Engineers Leave for Navy
Carl Bintz, C. B. Barnard, and II. T.
Porter, all senior engineers, left last
night for New York where they will
join other members of the class who
enlisted severalweek ago as second
class machinists' mates in the navy.

IN
My Own
Unitied-States
TO

The Majestic

9

Cleaned, Bleached and Reblocked
In the latest shapes, with all new trim-
mnings. Looks just like New;. We use
no acids. We do onlyhih ass work,
FACTORY HA S(ORE
617 Packard St.. neat tt}e Dc a
* Telcphoi1 .r ',-

.l

C'O M I N G

Wool Gabardines

. splendid collection of beautifully tailored skirts-for busi-
wear, for sports Wear, for dress. Every smart model-
every color!
$5 to $25,

l
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ARNOLD DALY

r!. _q
WUerthTheater
Afternoon-2:3o and 4:00
Evening-7:oo, 8:oo and io:oo
Phone-i6o-J
BOOKINGS FOR MAY
ESat--i8--William Russell in "The
^ Great Stanley Secret." Also News
and Comedy, "Hello Teacher."
SunMon-i9-2o - Julian Eltinge in
"The Widow's Might." Also Son of-
Democracy, "The Slave. Auction." E
-- ues-Wed-2 -122-Louise Glaum in -
"An Alien Enemy." Also "Eagle r
F ye," No. r i.
- Thursri-23-24-Vivian Martin in "A i
Petticoat Pilot." Also Keystone M
= Comedy, "Mud."
Sat-a,-Mary Miles Minter in "A
:it of Jade." Also News and Com.
edy.
IOrpheumllTheater
Afternoon-2:3o and 4::oo
Evening- :oo, 8:oo and to:oo
Phone-r~o-1
BOOKINGS FOR MAY
- Sat--i3-Bessie Love in "The Great
Adventure." Also News and Comedy.
Sinn-Mon-ig-2o-Margery Wilson in
"The Law of the Great Northwest."
Also News and Comedy.
Tues-22-W. S,.lHart in "The Nar-
row Trail." Also "Eagle Tye," No.
- Ix. (Ret.)
SWed-22--M1arguerite Clark in "B'ab's "
Diary." Also "Eagle Eye," No.11.:
(Ret.)
TkiursFri-23-24-f. Barney Shierry in
"Who Killed Walton." Also Comedy.-
Sat-25-"Dolly Does Her Bit." Also
1 News and Comedy.
Sun-Mon-26-27-Marcry Wilson in
"The Vinger Print." Also News and
S Comedy.
=i 111111111!111111111t111111U

TODAY,

MAJESTIC

A CURE- FOR THE BLUES

Taylor

Holmes

I

I

IN

"APair of, Sixes"
By Edward Peple
Shows Taylor Holmes in his Funniest Ro
Full of-Action-Love-Comedy
See this Picture You will Laugi

IAL PRICES ON
S and DRESSES'
Main and Liberty Streets

.SHOWS

AT 3:00, 7:00, 8:30

20 cents including 2c tax

Patronize a Daily Advertiser once
and you will patronize him again.

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