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May 17, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-17

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ASSOCIATEI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT W
SEIVICE

TODAY

No. 162.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 17, 1918.

PRICE

CST PLANS:
TUOWAR TODAY
LASSES SUSPENDED AFTER 3
O'CLOCK; LARGE CROWD
EXPECTED
ORTUNE ELECTED TO
LEAD CLASS OF 1920
.phomores Still Lack Candidates for
Obstacle Races and
Cane Spree
Three hundred members of the soph-
nore class held a peppy meeting
,t night in the amphitheatre of the
hysicls .building where 'they com-
seted their final preparations for
e underclassmen games to be held
Ais afternoon and tomorrow morning.
. P. Fortune, Varsity football guard,
as chosen by the second year men as
ieir captain for the spring events,
Ith Lieutenants C. E. Futch and C.
nith to assist him.
Contest Rules Outlined
James I. McClintock, '19, chairman
the spring games committee, offica-
d last night at the meeting of the
cond year men, explaining what had
be done and, in general, directing
te proceedings. A. W. Boyd, 18, Var-
ty football and basketball athlete,
rd the sophomores of the necessity
r their coming out in force for the
unes, thus upholding Michigan tradi-
ons. R. C. Patterson, '18, member
the spring games committee, went
rer the rules of the contest.
Sophs Lack Men
While the freshmen have all their
en chosen for the spring games, the
phomore class still lacks enough
en for the obstacle races and the
91e spree. Sophomore tryouts for
te obstacle races will be held from
to 2:30 o'clock this afternoon at Fer-
P field. One of the sophomore lieu-
nants will be in charge of these try-
its, A large number of speedy men
-e still needed to take part in these
Lces. Several husky men are also
ceded for the cane spree and candi-
tes for these positions are asked to
mmunicate with W. P. Fortune, the
.phomore captain.
Expect Many Spectators
President Harry.B. Hutchins has ex-
ised all classes after 3 o'clock this
fternoon and a large number of un-
rclassman rooters and upperclass-
an spectators are expected to turn
It to see the tug-of-war .events.
lan W. Boyd, '18, has been appointed
feree of the games and members
the Student Council will assist to
iforce the rules. The rules for the
)stacle races, the rope contest, and
ie cane spree will be published in
morrow morning's Daily.
(Continued on Page Four)
LED CROSS PARADE
WILL OPEN DRIVE
Preparations for the opening of the
3,000 Red Cross drive are nearing
mpletion with the announcement
at all students are expected to take
art in the big parade Tuesday.
Five booths for-voluntary contribu-
ons willbe erected on the campus,
be under the supervision of uni-
rsity girls, for Wednesday and
ursday. Virginia G. Cavendish, '1
the School of Music, has been plac-
i in charge of all wofk connected

ith the University. The following
ris were appointed yesterday to as-
st her in the work: Loraine D.
yll, '18; Hazel L. Beckwith, '19;
ileen Lamb, '18; Mary M. McDonald,
8; Margaret A. Yerkes, '18; and Mar-
n Frisbie, '18.
Each of 'the six will appoint a com-
ittee of four to take care of the act-
%I work in the booths. "It is every
rl's patriotic duty to aid in the
ork," said Miss Cavendish, in com-
enting on the people expected to
>lunteer their aid. Every junior and
nior will be expected to spend one
our in the booths both days. The'
ork of receiving contributions will
started the day following the par-

COUNCIL DECIDES
TO PUNISH HAZERS
Definite action regarding hazing was
taken last night by the Student Coun-
cil when it unanimously passed the
following resolution:
Resolved, That the Student Council
abolish all public hazing and in the
future enforce this stand by recom-
mending to the faculty for expulsion
of any students persisting in such
hazing.
The Council further decided that in
the future both pep meetings be held
on the Saturday before the games.
This action was also carried unani-
mously.
A cap-night committee was appoin-
ted as follows: C. T. VanDusen, '19E,
Chairman, V. Adams, '19D, C. T. Ho-
gan, '20E, and R. Munro, 19E.
"BE9lITUDES" SUNG ON
SECOND FESTIVI L NIGHT
CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA WELL
CONDUCTED BY DR.
STANLEY
(By Edna L. Apel)
"The Beatitudes," a poetical para-
phrase. of the Gospel, was given a
splendid rendition by the Choral union
and visiting artists in Hill auditorium
last evening.
The oratorio consists of an impres-
sive prologue and eight beatitudes.
The solo parts represent Christ.
Satan, the Angel of Death, the Angel
of Forgiveness, and the Holy Virgin.
The seventh Beatitude, the most
dramatic portion of the work, opening
with a brilliant and vehemently de-
clamatory air by Satan, was sung by
Arthur Middleton, whose voice is force-
ful with vibrant qualities.
Artists Pleasing
The rich, sonorous voice of Paul
Althouse was well adapted to the
strenuous tenor passages, and Ber-
nard Ferguson brought out a pleasing
depth of tone in his baritone solos.
Miss Lois Johnston was the Angel
of Forgiveness. Her voice is replete
with beautiful qualities, her tones
clear and true. Miss Emma Roberts
has a voice which sparkles with bril-
liancy. It was peculiarly fitted for the
"Mater Dolorosa."
The choruses and solo parts grew
more passionate and furious, the tend-
er voice of Christ trying to make it-
self heard above the chaos. Many
beautiful string quartet and tremolo
accompaniments and to this tremend-
ous climax, the celestial choruses
joining to bring the work to a close
with grand hosannas.
Dr. Stanley Exhibits Skill
Dr. A. A. Stanley exhibited skillful
conducting which might be likened to
that of Walter Damrosch because of
his dramatic force.
The first afternoon concert will oc-
cur at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon
when Rudolph Ganz, the Swedish
pianist, will play Tschaikowsky's
"Concerto in B fiat minor." The
Children's chorus will sing Benoit's
"Into the World." There will be or-
chestral numbers by the Chicago
symphony.
Mme. Claudia Muzio, soprano, will
sing tonight, the Chicago symphony
also contributing to the program.
SENIORS ASSEMBLE FOR THIRD
SING AT BAND STAND TONIGHT
Seniors will again assemble tonight
in cap and gown for the third sing of

the year.
Inclement weather has made the at-
tendance at the first two sings small-
er than usual and with the promise of
a good day, a large number of '18
men and women are expected.
The sing will begin promptly at 7
o'clock at the bandstand for the bene-
fit of those wishing to leave to attend
the May festival concert.. Joe Palma,
'18, will lead the singing.
Pennsylvania Students . Plan Party
Pennsylvania students are making
preparations for a party at the Michi-
gan Union on Friday, May 24. All
students from the state are invited to
attend. Tickets man be secured from
the committee.
Geta Tucker Announces Engagement
Announcement was made last night
at the Phi Beta Phi house of the en-
-gagement of' Geta Tucker, '17, to Harry

HUN PECEAIS
FONDINTRENCH
Belgium, Especially Antwerp Port,
To Remain Under German
Jurisdiction
FREEDOM OF SEAS FOR ALL
NATIONS TO BE PERMANENT
Central Powers to have Commercial
Fleet of 17,SOO,000 Tons; Cl-
onies Returned
With the American army in France,
May 16.-The Germans conditions of
peace are clearly stated in a document
found in a German trench that was
recently re-captured by Allied troops.
A resume of the principal conditions
says:
"After the enormous sacrifices we
have made, we exact the necessary
minimum for the preservation and the
development of Germany, from the
following:
"'Belgium, especially the Flanders
coast with Antwerp, is to remain un-
der German military, economic, and
political dependence.
"'Liberty of the seas shall be es-
tablished for all nations, the central
powers being allowed a commercial
fleet, totaling, 17,800,000 tons, while
that of the Allies should amount to
10,100,000 tons.
"'Our colonies shall be returned'."
VULCANS INITIATE
ELEVEN ENGINEERS
Vulcans, honorary engineering so-
ciety, held its annual spring initiation
last night. The following men were
initiated: W. C. Babbitt, '19E, C. B.
Campbell, '19E, R. S. Cooper, '19E, B.
Glenn, '18E, Fred Hendershot, '18E,
T. R. Jeffs, 19E, L. 0. B. Lindstrum,
'19E, J. R. McWilliams, '19E, E. C. L.
Matthews, '19E, Ray Munro, '19E, and
E. L. Nugent, '19E.
The initiation was followed by a
dinner at the Michigan Union. Pro-
fessor C. T. Johnston and Mr. J. H.
Cissel, of the Engineering college, de-
livered speeches. H W. Collins, '18E,
acted as toastmaster. Response for
the initiates was given by C. W. Camp-
bell.
DETROIT WANTS 9 U. OF M..
GIRLS FOR SCHOOL GARDENERS
A number of University of Michigan
Iwomen are to have the opportunity of
becoming Urban "farmerettes" in De-
troit. Miss Agnes Wells, acting dean
of women, has received a call from the
recreation division of the garden de-
partment there, asking for nine girls to
report immediately as directors and
supervisors of the school gadens in
that city.
The girls who are to go will be
chosen from a large list of applicants
by a special committee from the liter-
ary faculty. Arrangements regarding
credit for the work missed during the
remainder of the semester must be
made before any definite contracts are
considered, but it is thought that for-
mulation of satisfactory plans will not
take long.

UNION CAMPAINS
FOR LIFE MEMBERS
$250,000 Must be Raised to Put New
Building in Condition For
War Service'
LIFE MEMBERSHIPS SET AT
$50 DURING PRESENT DRIVE
Liberty Bond to be Accepted as Full
Payment; Will be Treated
as Cash
In order to raise $250,000 to put the
new Union building in condition for
war service, a campaign will be
launched immediately to secure this
amount by life membership subscrip-
tions.
The drive will be conducted both on
the campus and among the alumni.
C. T. VanDusen, '19E, has been chosen
chairman of the campus committee,
which will open its campaign the week
of May 26.
It is planned that $25,000 will be
raised among the students, while the
remaining $225,000 is to be secured by
subscriptions from the alumni. The
latter will be reached through the
mails and by personal solicitors who
will begin their canvass about the
second week in June.
To Accept Liberty Bonds
Liberty bonds will be accepted as
full payment on life memberships.
Any one who has made one or two pay-
ments on his subscription may turn
in his Liberty bond, which will be
treated as cash.
Although the regular price of a life
membership is $100, by a special action
of the board of directors of the Union,
the secretary has been instructed to
enter, as of March 30, 1918, all mem-
bership subscriptions received during
the month of April, May, and June,
1918. By this arrangement, all men
eligible to membership who subscribe
$50 during this period, will be en-
titled to a life membership.
Little Difficult Expected
Union officials expect little difficulty
in raising the $250,00 necessary to
complete the Union sufficiently so
that it may be used as a barracks and
mess hall for 700, or more, army me-
chanics after Aug. 15, 1918. It is
thought that the alumni and students
will respond willingly and enthusias-
tically to the call for funds.
FEW STUDENTS EXPECTED AT
CAMP DAVIS THIS SUMMER
Only 30 or 35 students are expected
at Camp Davis this summer as com-
pared with 89 who attended last year,
according to Prof. C. T. Johnston, di-
rector of the camp.
"This number includes the civil en-
gineers in the reserve corps and a few
forestry students," professor Johnson
said. "We usually have five or six
students from the literary college,
but do not expect any this year."
Prof. L. J. Young, of the forestry
department, said that though only
three from his. department have thus
far signified their intention of at-
tending the camp, he believed that the
six members of the present sophomore
class would probably do so, as it is
required for graduation.

GRIFFINS INITIATE
17 NEW MEMBERS
Griffins, All-campus honorary soci-
ety, held their spring initiation yes-
terday afternoon. Seventeen initiates
were admitted into the society, includ-
ing Edward K. Ruzicka, '20, who was
initiated "in absentia." The initiates
were: Carl E. Johnson, '20; Walter
S. Riess, '20; Raymond R. Beardsley,
'19; James H. Clark, '19; Oscar 1.
Cartwright, '19E; Timothy Y. Hewlitt,
'19E; Ingham Emerson, '19; Harry
Bennett, '19; Harold J. Saunders, '19;
Curtis C. Latir, '19D; Kenneth K.
Knode, '20H; Duncan Cameron, '19;
Russell Barnes, '20; William A. Leit-
zinger, '20; A. J. Cohn, '20; and Rus-
sell D'Ooge, '19.-,
Allen Shoenfield, '18, acted as toast-
master at the banquet, which was held
at the Michigan Union following the
initiation. Speeches were given, by
James Chenot, '19L; Chester Morri-
sons '19; and James Schermerhorn,
'18. Walter S. Riess, '20, spoke for the
neophytes.
GERMNS "T'ERRORIZE"
FRENCH BY AIR RAIDS
DAVIDSON SAYS HUNS ATTEMPT
TO DESTROY MORALE OF
CIVILIANS
New York, May 16.-A German of-
fensive against the civilian population
of France was described today by
Henry Davidson on his return from
his 12,000 mile tour of inspection of
Red Cross work abroad. He comes
back to inaugurate the drive for $100,-
000,000.
"The outsanding feature of German
methods at the present time," he said,
"is the effort to terrorize women,
children, and'old men at home. 'While
the German troops are making their
drive on the front, airplanes are
bombing nearly every night towns be-
'hind the lines with the deliberate pur-
pose of terrorizing civilians.
"The purpose of this fight behind the
lines is to break down the morale of
the civilian population to such a point
that they will importune their govern-
ment for peace."
BRITISH SUFFRAGIST TO TALK
ON WOMAN'S PART IN WAR

I

AUSTRIANS FROI
NESTS ON ASh
MONTE ASSALONE AND PER
SCENES OF BITTER
FIGHTING
U. S. GUNNERS FIRE
MONTDIDIER SHA

fl

Balfour Says England Will Consider
German Peace Proposals By
Accredited Persons
(By Associated Press)
Among the rugged peaks of the As-
iago plateau, east of the Brenta river,
the Italian front has again flamed in-
to violent action. The aggressive has
been taken by the Italians, and the
Austro-German forces, instead of
launching their assaults, have been
compelled to fight to maintain their
positions they have held since last
November.
Monte Assalone and Monte Pertica,
two heights -about three miles apart,
rising to the altitude of about 5,000
feet, have seen bitter fighting. The
Rome official statement says that the
Italians have entered the Austrian
trenches in two places.
Italians Take . Initiative
The fact that the Italian armies
have taken the initiative In the fight-
ing would seem to indicate that they
have sough to carry the fight to the
enemy in such a way to break up
any arrangement for the launching of
a Teutonic assault.
From Lake Garda to the Piave on
the Italian front, and to the sea, there
have been consoling engagements.
Heavy Artillery Fire
In Flanders and Picardy only heavy
artillery fire has marked the fighting
during the last few days. American
gunners have been at work in the
general bombardment that has been
going on. They have set buildings in
Montdidier in flames.
A raid on the Austrian naval base
at Pola has been made by Italian units,
and an Austrian battleship of 20,000
tons has been destroyed.
Soviets Call New Army
It has been announced from Wash-
ington that an official order has been
issued by the Soviet government of
Russia calling for the formation of an
army that will fight for the security
of the Rusian republic.
Arthur Balfour, British secretary
for foreign affairs, discussing in the
house of commons the famous letter
written by Emperor Charles, of Aus-
tria, to Prince Xixtus, of Bourbon,
,said that Great Britain is prepared
to consider proposals of peace from
the central powers provided they are
put forward by an accredited person
in a straightforward manner. He de-
clared that no offers thus far have
been made by Austria and Germany
that have been in the interest of a
fair and honorable peace.
PROF. 0. C. GLASER ACCEPTS
BIOLOGY CHAIR AT AMHERST
Prof. Otto C. Glaser, of the zoology
department, has accepted the chair of
biology at Amherst college and will
leave at 'the end of the' present se-
mester to fill it.
Professor Glaser came to the Uni-
versity in 1905 as an instructor and
soon after was made an assistant pro-
fessor. At present he is associate pro-
fessor of zoology and is an authority
on heredity. Before coming to Mich-
igan Professor Glaser taught at sev-
eral schools including the college of
physicians and surgeons at Baltimore.

Rules For Tug-o '- War Contests

Women's Part in Winning the
War," will be the subject of a lecture
to be given by Helen Fraser at 8:15
o'clock Monday evening in the auditor-
ium of the Natural Science building.
Miss Fraser is the author of "Women
and War."
President MacCracken of Vassar col-
lege was instrumental in bringing
Miss Fraser to this country. She is
commended as an excellent speaker.
Before the war she was engaged in
lecturing on suffrage and social sub-
jects through out Great Britain. She
was a member of the non-militant suf-
frage group. Since then she has been
continuously engaged in lecturing and
war work.
TWO GERMAN AIRPLANE RAIDS
THWARTED BY FRENCH FLIERS
Paris, May-16.-Two successive at-
tempts to reach Paris were made by
two distinct groups of German air-
planes last night. The first group,
after dropping bombs 18 miles south
of the point where they had crossed
the line, returned to their base before
11 o'clock at night..
A few minutes later, a second group
of four planes crossed at about the
same spot and headed southward.
This group was headed off after it had
covered a distance of 30 miles.
Red Cross Makes Another Shipment
Ninety articles of boys' clothing were
shipped yesterday by the Ann Arbor
branch of the Red Cross.
This is in addition to the splendid.
shipment made several weeks ago of
335 articles, including 28 dresses, 54
aprons, 16 underwaists,. 18 drawers,
30 chemises, 30 night dresses, 6 bath
robes, 6 pairs slipper, 8 pairs stock-
ings, 12 blouses, 3 comforters, 50 arti-,
cles for infants, 62 wash clothes, and
12 handkerchiefs.
The Annex reports that the west
end . churches are especially active.
in the renewed interest which the Red'
Cross drive is awakening, and almost
daily offers of help are received by,
the branch.

Underclassmen will meet at 3:15
o'clock this afternoon on the campus,
the sophomores at Waterman gymnas-
ium and the freshmen at the flag
pole.
Lieutenants of the various teams are
to line up their men in the order in
which they will pull during the con-
tests, and the teams will march in that
order to the scene of the contests.
Sophomore lightweight, sophomore
middleweight, and freshman heavy-
weight teams will assemble on the
west side of the river, while the sopho-
more heavyweight, freshman light-
weight, and freshman middleweight
will gather on the east bank of the
river.
Each contest will last 20 minutes,
the first 15 minutes to be pulled either
lying down or standing up, but the
last five minutes must be pulled
standing up.
One pistol shot will signify the be-
ginning of the contest, three shots

will mean that a brief stop has been
found compulsory, while four shots
will signify that the contest has end-
ed.
The decision will be awarded to the
team that succeeds in pulling the rope
until the white rag tied to the center
of it reaches a white flag statioped at
either side of the bank.
Any man who drops his grip on the
rope will be disqualified from the con-
test and refused further participation
in it.
Only the heavyweight teams are to
be allowed to attempt to pull each
other into the river. The other teams
must relax their grips on the rope
immediately upon the firing of four
shots.
The class winning two out of the
three contests will carry the rope
back up to the campus.
Each' of the contests is to count for
one point toward the total of six
points in the entire spring games.

* * * * * * * * * * *
*

*

*
*
*

'18 LITS MAY SECURE
INVITATIONS TODAY

* Senior lits may secure their i:
*, vitations from 2 to 4 o'clock th
* afternoon, and from 8 to 12 o
* clock tomorrow morning, in Un
* irersity hall by .presenting the r
* ceipts which were issued when tI
* invitations were paid for. As the
* will be the only times at whic
* these invitations will be distribu
* ed, all senior lits are' urged
* make arrangements for securir
* them.
*
* * * * * * * * * * *

Ver, '17E, Dies
ceived of the death
. '17E. after an ill-

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