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October 18, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-18

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BUY THAT LIBERTY BOND NOW!

THE WEATHER
SNOW OR RAIN
TODAY

trt aU juatt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXVIII. No. 15. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1917. PRICE THREE CENTS

JOINED PEP AND
LOAN MEETING To:
BE HELD FRIDAY
YOST, FOOTBALL TEAM AND BAND
TO INSTILL GREAT EN.
THUSIASM
SPEAKERS WILI DEAL
WITH M.A.C. CONTEST
Judge George P. Codd, Former Regent
of University, Will Pre-
side
Yost, the team, the band, the fac-
ulty, Judge George P. Codd, Edward
Shields, Bob Hamilton, in fact every
one and everything worth while on
the campus will be at the combination
M. A. C.-Liberty loan pep and mass
meeting at 7:30 o'clock Friday even-
s ing in Hill auditorium.
Pep meetings are common things at
the University, but a pep meeting with
a Liberty loan, "whip the kaiser at-
tachment" is something new. Three
speakers with records which bear out
their excellence have been secured to
instill spirit into the meeting.
A cheer leader or two will be pres-
ent to direct the vocal energy of the
mob and these will be ,assisted by a
man to lead songs. Two speakers will
talk upon the M. A. C. battle and the
third will deal with the Liberty loan
problem.
Judge George P. Codd, former re-
gent of the University, former Varsity
baseball captain, former mayor of De-
troit, and at present circuit court
judge of Detroit, will preside.
Prof. R. M. Wenley to Speak
Prof. Robert M. Wenley of the
philosophy department and Edward
Shields of Varsity baseball fame in
'92, '93, '94, '95, captain of the baseball
team in '95, Varsity football '95, who
later practiced law at Howell, and is
at present at Lansing, will speak
about the game and ifstill pep into
those gathered.
Frederick Fenton, spoken of as a big
man, \physically as well as mentally
and energetically, will speak upon the
Liberty loan. Fenton is chairman of
the Michigan division of the national
reserve banks.
Along with Fenton, Bud Hamilton,
not as well known on the campus as
some of the others but who has made
a considerable hit where he has ap-
peared, according to the committee in
charge of the program, will sing
"Goodbye Germany." The words of
this song will be flashed upon the
screen and Hamilton has offered to
teach his audience the song.
Announcements of the seating plans
and other arrangements made by those
in charge will appear in tomorrow's
Daily.
EXPECT RUSS-HUN
BATTLE 'IN BALTIC
Germags Hold Entire Possession of
Island of Oesel; Cut Slav
Communications
(By Associated Press)
The Germans are entirely in pos-
session of the island of Oesel at the
head of the Gulf of Riga and Russian
forces still there are kept from com-
munication with Petrograd.

Small naval engagements continue
in adjacent waters and German air-
craft are carrying out reconnoisances
over the island and the mainland to
the east.
The Berlin war office announces that
large quantities of booty were cap-
tured in Oesel, and that more than
1,100 prisoners were taken by the Ger-
mans Wednesday.
On the mainland to the south of
Riga, there has been considerable ac-
tivity on. the part of the Germans, who
at one point endeavored to throw
bridges over the Divina river. The
Russian artillery, however, frustrated
the attempt.
A report, which if true, probably in-
dicates that the Germans are prepar-
ing for a big naval demonstration
against the Russians from the Baltic,
comes from Southern Sweden. It says
a large number of German warcraft
were observed Monday and Tuesday
and the belief prevails that they were
reinforcements from the German Bal-

"SHADOW SOUP" FED
AMERICAN CAPTIVES
Life Would be Impossible Without Red
Cross and Y. X. C. A. Pack-
ages for Prisoners
Washington, Oct. 17.-Minister Mor-
ris at Stockholm today cabled the
state department news of the arrival
there of Willoc Charles Smith of Nor-
walk, Conn., who escaped from a Ger-
man internment camp' at Kiel and
brought word that American prisoners
in Germany were starved but for food
sent them by the Red Cross and Y.
M. C. A.
Smith was a horseman on the Brit-
ish steamer Esmeralda, captured by
the German raider Moewe, and was
carried into Germany just before the
United States broke diplomatic rela-
tions. No details concerning his es-
cape were given by the Minister.
"Smith said," read a state depart-
ment announcement of the escape,
"that without the food packages sent
by the Y. M. C. A. and the Red Cross,
prisoners would not be able to live,
as the daily food rations consist of a
slice of black, sour bread and a drink
of cold coffee for breakfast, and for
dinner and supper about a pint and
a half of of warm soup, apparently
consisting of water and turnips."
NEW DRAFT TAKES ONLY
UNSKILLED WAR WORKERS
PROiRAI AWILL BE ANNOUNCE
WHlEN APPROVED) BY
WILSON
Washington, Oct. 17. - A compre-
hensive new plan for applying the
army selective draft which escaped
first, only men without dependents
and of no particular value to war in-
dustry, and used various grades of
dependency of industrial value from
which future drafts, would be made
strictly on the seletive basis, has
been worked out tentatively by the
Provost Marshall General's office and
discussed with the president.
The plan it was learned, today, was
submitted recently to a conference of
civilians who directed exemption board'
activities in a number of states and
received endorsement of most of them.
They are now discussing the proposed
plan with their state governors.
In selecting men for examination,
boards would first take all men phy-
sically fit having neither dependants
nor value in essential war industries.
When this class was exhausted,
draft authorities would draw on the
classes having the slightest depend-
ency claims and the least value in es-
sential industries. No class would be
exempted as such but valuable men
would l placed. so that they would
not be called until the need for sold-
iers became more urgent and all the
less essential classes were exhausted.
It is understood the entire program
will be made known a soon as it is
completed and approved by President
Wilson.

MICHIGAN SLUMPS
Eighty-eight Men Start Large Ter-
ritorial Campaign
Tonight

PHI KAPPA PSI HEADS
SUBSCRIPTION

LIST

Bob Hamilton Will Sing "So Long
Germany" at Mass Meeting
Tomorrow
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

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What Michigan is loaning to
Uncle Sam to help smash Prus-
sianism:
The ten highest subscribers:
Phi Kappa Psi, $3,350.
Zeta Beta Tau, $2,500.'
Alpha Delta Phi, $1,500.
Chinese Club, $1,050.
Arcadia, $900.
Collegiate Sorosis, $850.
Delta Kappa Epsilon, $700.
Alpha Sigma Phi, $700.
Phi Gamma Delta, $500.
Senior engineers, $350.'
Wednesday subscriptions among
students, $5,150.
Total purchase to date, $16,650.
University's quota, $200,000.
Faculty subscriptions, $59,000.
To beat Princeton's quota Mich-
igan must buy $324,350 worth of
bonds.'
Step up to that Campus tent
and GET YOURS NOW.

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DIN OF "VICTORS"
TO WORRY KAISER
Regimental Band on Border Learns
Notes of Michigan's Famous
March
Michigan's war song may soon be-
come a national one.
A request for the words of the "Vic-
tors" is contained in a letter from T.
A. Hart, '19, of the Eighth cavalry,
United States army, now stationed on
the Mexican border. Hart says that
the regimental band has already
learned the notes of Michigan's fa-
mous march and that the soldier boys
are anxious to learn the words.
There have been numerous other oc-
casions on which Michigan music has
been in popular demand. In a num-
ber of the concentration camps former
students of the University are con-
stantly asking for copies of the Michi-
gan song book.
U-BOA TORPEDOES AN
AMEICANDESTROYER
GUNNER'S MATE KILLED AND 5
SEAMAN WOUNDED; SHIP
MAKES PORT
Washington, Oct. 17.-An American
destroyer on patrol duty was tor-
pedoed by an enemy submarine yes-
terday and one man killed and five
wounded.
She managed to make port in spite
of severe damage.
Vice Adiiral Sims cabled a brief

VARSITY WINS HARD FOUGHT GAME
FROM DETROIT 14-3; NEW PLAYS
HELP IN BRINGING ABOUT VICTORY
r - 1 2

WHAT-A $50 LIBERTY
LOAN BOND WILL DO
"Do You know what a $50 Lib-
erty bond will do? Considerl It
will-
"Buy three Springfield rifles
complete.
"Buy 1,500 rounds of am-
munition, enough to supply 16
soldiers going into battle.
"Buy 10 new rifle barrels to
replace those worn out.
"Pay one soldier for seven
weeks.
"Feed one soldier five months
or a company of 150 enlisted
men one day.
"Equip one soldier with cloth-
ing complete for a three-year
enlistment period.
"Keep clothing of one soldier
in repair and replace worn out
clothing for two years."
-From the Harvard Crimson of
Oct. 15, 1917.
UYENROLLMENT
SHOWS LARGE DECREASE

* * * * * * * * * * * *.

.-

The University slumped
low her Tuesday Liberty
scription total yesterday,
day of her campaign.

$1,900 be-
loan sub-
the third

Reports of the committee late last
night showed that but $5,150 had been
subscribed to the loan Wednesday. The
total student bond purchase is now
$16,650.
Eighty-eight men will start a town-
combing territorial campaign tonight,
and no student will be deprived of his
opportunity to buy some of the second
issue. The men are to be divided into
11 groups, captained by the following:
Stephen Attwood, '18E, John Chase,
'19, Ralph Gault, '19, Norman Ibsen,
'18E, Albert Horne, '18, H. A. Knowl-
son, '18, Robert McDonald, '18, W. S.
Dinwiddie, '18E, Donald Drake, '17E,
Lansing Thomas, '18E.
Frederick R. Fenton, chairman for
Michigan of the federal reserve dis-
trict of Chicago, has consented to pre-
sent new features of the Liberty loan
at the M. A. C. mass meeting Friday
'night in Hill auditorium. "So Long
Germany," the new catchy patriotic
song, will be sung for the first time
before a large audience by Bob Ham-
ilton.
Honor Societies to Buy Bonds Jointly
Nearly all the honor societies have
signified their intentions of clubbing
together to buy bonds.
The Chinese club showed their
American Michigan spirit by the pur-
chase of $1,050 worth of the issue.
Volunteer organizations who will
take charge of the campaign tent at
State street and University avenue are
being sought by the committee. The
Trigons have the tent management
this week. The. purpose of the sta-
tion at the State street corner is to
give students an opportunity to sign
applications for the loan.
"Why can't I take a $100 bond?"
asked one student when he signed for
a $50 certificate, "If there hadn't been
a world's series, I might have."
This instance, according to the com-
mittee, is characteristic of the general
student extravagance which coula
well help save Michigan's repu'tation
in filling her loan allotment.
Campaigning among the faculty will
be renewed today in a personal can-
vass. The drive will be brief and will
give every faculty man a chance to
do his bit.
Ann Arbor's subscription to the sec-
ond Liberty loan reached a total of
$395,450, more than two-thirds of the
county's quota, at noon yesterday. The
total of bonds purchased in Washte-
naw county is reported at $597,000.
Detroit Raises Half of Second Loan
Detroit, Oct. 17.- Subscriptions to
the Liberty loan in Detroit today pass-
ed the $30,000,000 dollar mark, half
way towards the city's quota of $60,-
000,000.

report of the incident to the naval de-
partment late today. He gave few de-
tails but it is assumed there was no
fight and that the U-boat made good'
her escape after launching a torpedo
when submerged.
Gunner's' Mate Ingram was the man
killed. He was blown overboard by
the explosion andhisrbody was not
recovered. His mother lives in Ala-
bama. In accordance with the policy
of secrecy concerning American naval
operations, the department did not di-
vulge the name of the destroyer or
the exact place of the encounter.
None of the wounded men were seri-
ously hurt.
They are: Herman Pankratz, gun-
ner's mate, St. Louis; William E. Mer-
ritt, seaman, New York; Frank W.
Kruse, Toledo; Patrick Rutledge, oil-
er, New York City; William Selmer,
fireman, Dundas, Minn.
TRIBUTE PAID
MICHIGAN MAN
DonI M. Dickinson, '67L, is Buried with
high Honors; Members of De.
troit Bar March
Honors and marked tribute were
paid yesterday to the memory of Don
M. Dickinson, '67L, who died Monday.
Mr. Dickinson was former postmaster-
general during President Cleveland's
administration. Judge Howard Wiest,
presiding judge of Michigan, ordered
the Wayn'e county circuit courts
closed for the day.
A cortege of honor, composed of
circuit court judges and leading ,mem-
bers of the Detroit bar marched in a
procession to the cemetery. Among
this. body were Judge George S. Hos-
mer, ex-Judge James O. Murfin, and
Judge Henry A. Mandell.
In Washington, Postmaster-General
Burleson ordered the flags to be kept
at half mast on the postoffice building
during the day as a tribute to the
f o r m e r postmaster-general. Sym-
pathetic telegrams of condolence have
been pouring in to the relatives of the
deceased from all over the country.
Dramatic Critic of N. Y. Times Dies
New York, Oct. 17. - Edward A.
Dithmar, dramatic critic of the New
York Times, and for 40 years a mem-
ber of the editorial staff of that news-
paper, is dead following an opera-
tion. Mr. Dithmar was 63 years old.
U. S. Adds $733000,000 to Entente Loan
Washington, Oct. 17.-Loanis of $50,-
000,000 to Russia, $20,000,000 to France
and $3,000,000 to Belgium made today
brought the total credits of the United
States to allied nations up to $2,711,-
400,000..

MEDICAL SCHOOL HAS GAIN OF
16 STUDENTS OVER
LAST YEAR
With a total enrollment of 4,690 stu-
dents for this year as against 5,944 of
the year previous it becomes evident
that what is perhaps Michigan's great-
est war sacrifice amounts to a loss of
1,254 men.
Every school and college in the Uni-
versity except the Medical school has
felt the brunt of this loss. The Med-
ical school enrollment shows a gain
of 16, which is probably due to the
fact that drafted medical students
have been permitted to return to their
studies on the condition that they are
liable to immediate call.
The literary college suffered the
greatest loss in numbers. The Law
school, however, suffered the greatest
proportionate loss-over one-half the
enrollment amount of last year. The
loss is totally in men students-about
20 per cent-while the enrollment of
women is the same this year as for
1916 The new course in Army Stores
Methods has an enrollment of 350.
The following are the latest figures
for the years 1916 and 1917:
Literary college-1916, 3,106; 1917;
2,485; a loss of 621. Engineering col-
lege-1916, 1,472; 1917, 1,156; a loss
of 316. Medical school-1916, 321;
1917, 337; a gain of 16. Law school-
1916, 375; 1917, 177; a loss of 198.
Pharmacy college-1916, 105; 1917, 75;
a loss of 30. Homoeopathic school-
1916, 52; 1917, 37; a loss of 15. Dental
school-1916, 346; 1917, 305; a loss
of 41. Graduate school-1916, 266;
1917, 187; a loss of 79.
SOCIETY INITIATES
Woolsack's Take in Five Junior Laws;
Give Banquet Tonight
Five junior laws have been elected
to the Woolsack, honorary society.
The new members are as follows:
Ronald A. Butler, Thomas E. Phillips,
Leslie G. Field, Eugene Kirkby, and
Donald F. Geddes.
An initiatory banquet will be held
tonight at the Renelen Hospice. Prof.
E. C. Goddard and R. W. Aigler of the
law department will be the principal
speakers.
Guardsmen Killed in Railroad Wreck
Spartanburg, S. C., Oct. 17.- Five
New. York national guards were kill-
ed and several others hurt early to-
night in a head on collision between
two cars on the Piedmont and North-
ern Electric railway between this city
and Camp Wadworth.

GOODSELL AND FITZGERALD RE-
MOVED FROM GAME FOR.
ROUGHNESS
WESTON NOT BADLY
HURT, BUT RETIRES
Wet Field Causes Many Fumbles For
Visitors Which Aid Wolverines
To One Score
Michigan, 14; University of D-
troit, 3.
That's the score as it read at the
end of the hardest fought game seen
on Ferry field this season. The De-
troiters came to Ann Arbor yesterday
with a reputation and a 145-point vic-
tory against the University of Toledo
to their credit. But the Wolverine ag-
gregation took to the Duffytes like
fish to water.
It took the Yostmen all the first
quarter and a good part of the sec-
ond to get on to the Detroiters, but
when they got started they encoun-
tered no great difficulties.
Both teams had a slippery field to'
contend with and as a result fumblng
marred the game. Perhaps the fact
that the. Detroit eleven engaged in
this department a little too lavishly
accounts for their defeat.
Wolverines Win Toss
The Wolverines won the toss and
elected the east goal. Play started
when Culver kicked off. Edwards
brought the leather back 10 yards.
Michigan was penalized five yards on
the first down for off side. The De-
troiters succeeded in making first
down and then fumbled. Michigan re-
covered the ball on the 40-yard line.
The Wolverines could not gain and
were compelled to kick. Duffy's men
were penalized 15 yards for holding
and then kicked -back to the Wolver-
ines. Neither team did much damage
for the rest of the quarter.
The Detroiters successfully executed
a forward pass, Edwards to Allen,
which netted them 29 yards. Another
forward pass failed and the visitors
were compelled to punt. Michigan
tried a couple of long passes without
much success. On the first down the
Detroiters were held for no gain. The
next play was a forward pass which
Froemke intercepted. He was finally
stopped on the visitors' two-yard line.
On the first down Wieman lugged the
ball over for the first score of the
game.
Yost Takes Squad Indoors
Between halves Coach Yost took
his squad into the clubhouse for the
first time this year. The reason for
this move is a matter for conjuncture.
Some say the coach wanted to use
strong language while others are of
the opinion that the cold wave was
responsible for this bit of strategy.
Voss kicked off to Weske, who car-
ried the ball back 20 yards. Several
tries for plunges through the De-
-troiters' line brought no results and
Wieian was forced to kick. Edwards
was downed in his tracks on the eight-
yard line. The Duffyites punted back
without any try at straight football.
On a trick forward pass which beat
Minnesota in 1903, the Wolverines
gained 25 yards. Another pass,
Froemke to Goetz, netted Michigan a
second touchdown. Wieman kicked
goal.
Detroit took a decided brace, and
started a march 50 yards down the
field. A fake play brought no results.
The ball was on the Detroiters' 27-
yard line. Allen dropped back and
dropped a perfect goal.
Weston Hurt .
The visitors went out for the Wol-

verines' blood when Lambert stepped
in and spoiled another forward pass
in the fourth session. Goodsell and
Fitzgerald were put off the field for
roughing it up. The Detroiters& be-
gan tearing up distance between them
and the goal posts. Weston was hurt,
and had to be carried off the field. A
few more plays brought the visitors
on Michigan's four-yard line. Michi-
gan held Detroit for downs, -missing.
six points by less than 'a yard. Cohn
went through center for five yards as
(Continued on Page Three.)

SUBMIT

YELLS

Winner nof Contest to Receive Free
Ticket to 1. A. C. Game
"U.-S.-A., U.-S.-A.,
To lick the Germans
We'll have to pay."
"Yea Liberty,
Yea Loan,
Yea, Yea, Liberty Loan."
The above are two of the yells sub-
mitten to the judges for the Liberty
loan yell contest. Both of them are
novel and deserve praise.
Yells are to be handed in to the
editor of The Michigan Daily not later
than 6 o'clock tomorrow night. The
person submitting the best will be
given a free ticket to the M. A. C.
game Saturday afternoon.
Armory Dances to Be Continued
Week-end dances will be continued
at the- Armory this year. There will
be a dance every Friday aifd Saturday
night. Mr. and Mrs. Ray Bassett, city
forester, will act as chaperones to-
morrow night. The affairs will be of
the same high standard as that of last
year, and have been sanctioned by
members of the faculty.

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