100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 15, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I-

rSitr i an

:43 at lx

w

DAY

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 1918. PR:

HILL

.

"

STRIVE
PASSAGE

FORI

iHY

WOLVERINES ENTER
CHAMPIONSHIP MEET
New York, May 14.-Seventeen col-
leges and universities have entered'
teams for the annual track and field
championship games, of the inter-col-
legiate amateur athletic association, to
be held on May 31 and June 1, at
Franklin field, Philadelphia, Penn.
The list closed on Saturday.
A surprise was the entry of a team
from' the University of Michigan,
which recently rejoined the western
conference league, and will compete
in the Big Ten gamed on June 8 in
the middle west. The Wolverines
have a small group of high class per-
formers, and should the points be
well distributed at Franklin field,
Michigan may succeed in winning the
championship in the what probably
will be her final appearance in Eas-
tern college athletics for some sea-
sons.
66 60 MEN TOL E
FOR CAMPS BEFORE JUNE

ows Heavy
i1 Hun

r in France,
but import-
Kemmel, ap-
hands of the
egan an as-
and gained a
at latest re-
tenaciously
French have
s vigorously.
May 14. -
during the
'against our
h of Given-
mmunication

CAMP

CUSTER RECEIVES
ASSIGNMENTS OF
TROOPS

loss-I

o rush
h, was
ig the

ich positions on
landers and Pic-
been embroiled
vy artillery duels
in the Vosges

Attack
the line,
vitzerland
1 infantry
once. Near
delivered

en

G err

Jill 44 in the
cial accounts
ed a foothold
but that the
hem hard.

I, in Flanders, the
iitative, and inflict-
he enemy. On the
French carried out
ver.
ermans everywhere
omparatively quiet,
ening their line, in
power.
is delivered, it is
nemy will strive for
separating of the
h armies, and the
age to the channel

Washington, May 14.-Twenty-four
states, and the District of Columbus,
were called upon tonight by Provost
Marshal General Crowder to furnish
the national army 61,600 more men
qualified for general military service.
A movement of drafted members,
under this call, is to extend under two
periods, from May 20 to 24, and from
May 29 to June 2. These dates were
fixed, because during the five days,
beginning may 25, approximately
223,000 men, called for recently, will
be moving to the camps.
In all, 284,600 men will be journey-
Ing from their homes to military
camps between May 20 and June 2
Including numerous calls for techni-
cal and specially qualified men, the
total number, summoned during May,
is something light 366.600-men. Near-
ly half of the 800,000 are expected to
be called this year.
The camps selected for'the regis-
trants, affected by. tonight's order, are
not all national army camps, showing
that men are to be sent wherever
room may be found for them.
The states drawn upon, and the
camps assigned them, do not include
Michigan or an assignment to Camp
Custer. .
140'MICHIGAN WOMEN OFFER
SERVICES FOR FARM WORK
The "back to the farm" idea as a
substitute for frivolous vacations is
increasing in popularity every day
among Michigan women.
Miss Alice Evans reports more than
140 applications, 66 of which have
been accepted so fa .
It is expected that more definite in-
formation concerning places of em-
ployment, and detailed outlines of the
work, which is to come from Lansing
this week with a special committee,.
will be effective in securing more "re-
cruits."
Miss Helen Frazer, the noted Eng-
lish war-worker, is also an enthu-
siastic supporter of this branch of
service, and will devote part of her
lecture next Monday morning to a
thorough treatment o its various as-
pects.--
100 Forestry Students Serve In France
"Nearly 100 former forestry students
are now serving the colors and a
large number of them are in France,"'
said Prof. Filibert Roth, head of the
forestry department, yesterday, "There
are at present only thirty students left
in the department as all of the seniors
and most of the juniors have left."
Professor Roth said that although
the forestry students were given the
opportunity to join the forestry divi-
sion of the engineering reserve corps
that none of them did so as most of
those eligible preferred to go into
service immediately.
"It would be mere guess work to
predict how many students will enter
the department next year," Professor
Roth stated, "but twice as many en-
tered last fall as did In 1916." The to-
tal number of Freshman foresters

LAO WILL OPEN
FESTIVAL TONIGHT
Substitutes For Stracciari Whose En-
gngement was cancelled Because
of Illness
MATZENAUER, CONTRALTO, WILL
BE ACCOMPANIED BY LA FORGE
Army Mechanics Invited to Attend
Concert as Guests of
Association
Hipolito Lazaro, the Spanish tenor
of the Metropolitan Opera house, will
substitute in the opening concert of
the May Festival at 8:15.o'clock to-
night in Hill auditoriujn, for Riccardo
Stracciari, who is unable to appear on
account of an attack of appendicitis.
Margarete Matzenauer, the Austrian
contralto, will sing -a group of songs.
She will be accompanied by Frank La
Forge.
Lazaro First Rank Tenor
Lazaro's voice was discovered when
he was serving as a soldier in the
Spanish army under "Butcher" Weyler
in the Spanish-American war.- He
was given an extended furlough from
the army in order to secure.a musi-
cal education. He has sung in many
European musical centers. During
the past winter he made his debut at
the Metropolitan Opera house in New
York city. Since then he has been
recognized as a tenor of first rank.
The 200 army mechanics have been
invited as guests of the May Festival
association to attend the concert.
Announces Program
The program will consist of the
following:
Chicago Symphony orchestra, Mr.
Frederick Stock, conductor, "Amer-
ica"
"0 Paradiso" from "L'African
...... . ... .Myerbeer
"Spirito Gentil" from "La Favor-
ita".................Donizetti
"Cielo E. Mar" from "La G-
conda"...............Poncielli
Sig.'Hipolito Lazaro.
Songs with the piano;
Before the Crucifix ..Frank La Forge
Sorrow in Springtime (in Rus-
sian)............Rachmaninoff
Dear Lad o'Mine.......Branscombe
Carnival ..................Fourdrain
Mme. Margarete Matzenauer
Frank La Forge, accompanist. ,
ATHENA LITERAY SOCIETY
PLANS FOR "LIBERTY" CONCERT
Plans for the "Liberty" contest
were discussed at a meeting of the
Athena literary society Monday' night
in Mason hall. It was decided that,
in order to stimulate interest among
the members, topics of war propa-
ganda would be discussed in the reg-
ular meetings of the society.
A brief resume of Russia's position
in regard to the present war, was pre-
sented by Ida Mines, '20, at this meet-
ing, and extemporaneous discussions
on this subject were -given by other
members.
The election of oratorical board offi-
cers which will be held Saturday
morning was brought before the sb-
ciety as an event which should be
given particular consideration by wo-
men of the University interested in
oratorical activities.
Casualty List Numbers 72
Today's casualty list showed 72
names. Killed in action, 14; died of
wounds, seven; died of disease, three;
wounded slightly, 21; missing In ac-

tion 27.
Officers named included Captain
Lloyd B. Russell, Manchester, Okla.,
and Lieutenants Herbert Boyer, San
Francisco, and Stephen E. Fitzgerald,
Dorchester, Mass., killed in action.
Major John L. Haskins, Minneapolis;
Captain Michael J. O'Conner, Boston,
and Lieutenants Edward M. Guild,'
Nahant, Mass., * William A: Murphy,
Chicago and Ray E. Smith, Rutland,
Vt., wounded slightly; Lieutenant Ben-
jamin C. Byrd, Hartford, Conn.
Wilson, '19, Leaves for Service
Herbert E. Wilson, '19, left last!
week for Indianapolis, where he will
join the national army.
Wilson was deeply interested in
inter-collegiate athletics, and while at
the University of Iowa, which he at-.
tended before he came to Michigan,
wrote frequent articles in various
newspapers asking Michigan to return

MILITARY CAMP MEN
MAY RECEIVE CREDIT
"The committee on national service
of the colleges of Engineering and
Architecture will recommend to the
faculty that permission be granted to
students in the R. 0. T. C., not in the
engineer or naval enlisted reserve
corps, who are over 21 years of age
or will become 21 before June 5, to
attend the training camp this summer
at Fort Sheridan, Ill.,"
"Such students as may be appointed
for this camp will receive credit for
such camp in lieu of the three last
weeks of the semester provided their
work is satisfactory and provided that.
they do not leave the University be-
fore noon of June 1."
FRESHMEN TO HOLD BIG
PEP MEETING TONIGHT,
YEARLINGS TO ELECT CAPTAINS
TO DIRECT SPRING
TUSSLES
Every able-bodied, class spirited
freshman is expected by the commit-

tee on class games to attend the pep UNIVERSITY EXPECTED TO HELP

OV1E RNMENT SIGNS CONTRACT
INSTRUCTION OF 500 ADDIT
ARMY MECHANICS AT UNII

meeting to be held at 7 o'clock tonight
in the ampitheatre of the Physics
building. A fresh pot will be neces-
sary for admission. Robert T. Mc-
Donald, '18, will explain the "sure-
fire" Michigan spirit to the first year
men.
R. C. Patterson, '18, member of the
class games committee, will explain
the rules of the contest to the fresh-
men. J. I. MClintock, '19, chairman
of the committee, will act as chairman
of the meeting, introducing the speak-
ers.
Two captains will be elected by the
grey-potted men at this rally, one to
take charge of the tug-of-war events
and the other to direct the rope con-
test. The captain of the' tug events
will appoint three lieutenants to take
charge of the various weighted teams
and the rope contest director will
select 20 men for the cane spree and
three lieutenants for the obstacle
races.
Information given out about the rope
contest tends to show that it will be
one of the roughest of class games
ever staged at Michigan.
POLICEMAN BIT BY MAD DOG
DECLARED OUT OF DANGER
The Ann Arbor policeman who was
bitten by a mad dog which he at-
tempted to capture last Wednesday is
reported to be out of danger from
hydrophobia. The dog was shot im-
mediately afterward and the remains
taken to the Pasteur institute at the
Medical building where a positive
diagnosis of hydrophobia was made.
The injuries sustained by the officer
were slight and he recived prompt
treatment.
The diagnosis necessitated the rec-
ent order of the police department
that no dogs shall be allowed to run
loose in thestreets.
The dog came from the country
north of Ann Arbor and is reported
to have bitten several other dogs
before he reached the city limits.
Merchants to Have Dollar Day
The merchants of Ann Arbor have
selected Thursday, May 23, as dollar
day. This day will be of unusual in-
terest to some who are looking for
real bargains.
Dollar day has come to be very pop-
ular with the public, because it real-
izes that the merchants are not try-
ing to unload upon them, unseason-
able or undesirable merchandise. Ev-
ery merchant will try to give his
customers the greatest possible value
for a dollar, upon this day. A greater
supply of those articles for which
there will be a larger demand have
been placed in stock. Every merchant
who took part in the last dollar day,
will participate in the sale.
Mrs. Raymond Wafer Dies at Hospital
Mrs.'Raymond Wafer died suddenly
Sunday night at the Ann Arbor pri-
vate hospital. She is survived by
an infant daughter and her husband,
Dr. Raymond F. Wafer of the psychia-
try department of the University hos-

,U

RAISE QUOTA OF
$13,000
The University is counted upon to
do its part in raising Ann Arbor's
quota of $13,000 for the American Red
Cross.
The drive is to be distinguished from
other campaigns owing to the system
of voluntary contributions which has
been decided upon. The first three
days of the campaign, May 21, 22, and
23, will be used entirely for voluntary
subscriptions. For that purpose, five
booths are to be erected on the cam-
pus, to be under the supervision of
University girls. A booth will be
placed at each corner of the campus,
and one in the neighborhood of the
flag pole.
Large Contributions Not Expected
Large contributions are not expec-
ted from the individual student, ac-
cording to men in charge of the drive,
a dollar a student would be a splendid
showing for the University. However,
large subscriptions are being planned
by some of the societies in the Uni-
versity, and the School of Music,
which would otherwise be expended
for spring entertainments, group pho-
tographs, dance favors, and flowers.
The big feature that will launch
the campaign is the Red Cross parade
on Tuesday, May 21, in which most
organizations of the city are expected
to take part. Plans are being made
to include the army mechanics men,
the R. o. T. C., and the University
band in the parade. The work of re-
ceiving contributions will start im-
mediately after the parade. -
Money to be War Fund
Contributions made during this
campaign do not include Red Cross
membership. The money raised will
be used entirely as a war fund. It is
to be sent to the Red Cross headquar-
ters in Europe, and then disposed of
in the manner seen fit by them. Here-
tofore the money raised for the Red
Cross was used for local needs, but
this is to be used wholly for imme-
diate needs of the men in service.
Abner Larned to Speak
Abner Larned, one of the men who
was on the Tuscania when it was
torpedoed by a U-boat, has been secur-
ed to delived an addres on the even-
ing of May 17 in Ann Arbor. He is
known as one of the foremost orators
of the United States, and he is now
general chairman of the drive in De-
troit.
Dents to Enter Service June 1
Several seniors and Juniors of the
dental reserve have received noti-
fication from Washington that they
will be called into service June 1st or
possibly earlier. They will be dental
assistants., with the rank of privates
until examinations for commissions
are held. The news has thrown these
classes into some excitement due to
the fact that final examinations do
not begin until June 10. The faculty
is expected to make some provision

* in University hall to all seniors
* bringing their receipts for them.
* This will be the only opportunity
* for literary seniors to procure
* their invitations and they are
* therefore advised by the commit-
* tee to make sure of getting them
* on that day.

* Senior lit invitations have ar- *
* rived and will be distributed from *
* 8 to 12 o'clock Saturday morning *

*
*
*

Senior Invitations Saturday

* * * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*

RED CROSS CAMPAIGN IN
CITY TO' BEGIN MAY 21

*
*

(M. K. -E.)
Acceptance of the terms o
iversity's contract for the ti
500 additional army mecha
received by telegram from
ton yesterday. Secretary
Smith, to whom the telegran
dressed, stated that the wa
ment officials had accepted
tract in the form in which it
mitted last week.
Under the terms, of the a
the government is to send
chanics here June 15, 200
will replace the 199 men i
iersity of Michigan trainin
ment, and the additional I
scheduled to pursue courses
ilar nature.
Officials of the engineeri
and the Union are making
tions for the instruction a
of the new contingent.
Cantonment-Type Bull
Plans are now being mas
construction of a canton
building just south of the e
shops of the campus. This
will be used for training th
ics in automobile chassis cw
size and materials of which
ing will be consructed hat
been decided upon.
The 700 men will be fed
Union building. Five hundre
will be lodged in Waterma
ium, while the remaining 2
quartered in the houses no
by the 199 men in trainingI
Union to Raise $100,4
A meeting of the Uni
bership committee has b
ed for Thursday, when plai
discussed for raising $100,0(
plete the new Union suffi
house and-feed 700 mecha
Aug. 15, the date on which t1
lotment is to finish its cou
struction.
32 DRAFTED ANN ARBO1
LEFT YESTERDAY F
Soon after 10 o'clock yes
young men lined up in th
of the court house and rec
final instructions from W
Esslinger, chairman of the:
board. They were given
farewell demonstration bya
are made to know and fee
people at home are behind
Karl A. Boettger was appc
tain, and he was given the
appoint assistants as nee
men who left are: Karl A.
Wacel N. Dwarakov, Earl 4
liam L.. Winkleman, Elmer
Arnold C. Busch, Lyman.lD
Claire J. Blythe, Roy H. Bu
rian J. Leever, Herman
ward J.-Brokaw, Harold C.
James W. Wilson, Leonard
man, Andrew -L. Minzey,(
Schoeffle, William M. Breini
R' 0. Luenser, Harry Allen,
Baur,' Simon E. Wollf, Rol
Harold Allen, Freeman G. A'
Lambert, Ivan H. Beeman,
C. Davis, George Stackle
Sobal, John S. Lafferty, C
Moore.
The .boys will start for
and then to various training
Language Dept. Adopts Fren
Members of the Roman
department at the Universil
nesota have adopted a Fren
by means of fines collecte
sences and tardinesses at
weekly meeting. Delinquen
are penalized five cents a n
tardiness and $1.00 for Sab
It was suggested thatI
spending the money on an:

PL ANS BEING MADE
TONMENT TYPE BI
ON CAMPUS
MEN TO BE LOD
WATERMAN GY\
Union Committee to Arran
ing $100,000 at 2
Thursday

a

at

inte Corno
, considerable
id Monte Cor-
e approach to
>m Trent to

h weekly casuality list, is-
y, aggregates 41,612, of
er, 501 ?officers and 5,065
illed or died of wounds.
to Get "Independence"
effort, to force former
jects to take up arms
Entente Allies, has been
e German emperor in a
i announcing the "inde-
f Lithuania. The emperor
o assumes, that the con-
be concluded "will take
of the German empire to
wally with those of. Lith-

ble, fight-
v between
.ists.

vote of

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan