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May 14, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- I U P OL)xx 1, 1Y1.

...,.

_.....
v_

Valk-Over

OLLEGE
MODISH
Comfort-

,
=

voman is as young as her feet. Here are the very
t keep your feet feeling young, vigorous and stylishly
inged Tip and Military Heel
Black and Brown calf, white Buck and white cloth.
Either Boots or Oxfords.
alk-Over Boot Shop.
115 SOUTH MAIN STREET
dents of the University of Michigan
inspect our new line of very smart models in
(oung Men's Top-coats
(oung Men's Gabardines
(oung Men's Suits

ilored garments every one 'of them.
as. We advise early inspection.

Fashions

z Plate of Ice Cream every Day

C rEAM
C REA M

® p 4"

ious, Refreshing, Nourishing

ADITIONAL SRTS
To Select Winner
Of VJig Ten Medal
Michigan's best athlete and scholar
will be selected next Saturday by a
joint committee of representatives of
the Board in Control of Athletics and
the deans of the various colleges. The
occasion for this selection is the pre-
sentation of the Conference medal for
the highest standing in both"scholar-
ship and athletics, which is given by
the Big Ten each year to the senior
in each university with the best re-
cords.
In other Conference schools this
medal has always been considered one
of the highst honors one could re-
ceive and has been a goal much striv-
en for. This is the first year the me-
dal has been given at Michigan since
the Wolverines returned to the Con-
ference and the announcement of the
winner will undoubtedly arouse con-
siderable interest.
Prof. R. W. Aigler, Philip G. Bartel-
me and others on the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics, will probably sub-
mit a list of available candidates to
the deans who will go over the names
from the viewpoint of scholarship. In
this way the man who has made the
best combined record will be found.
Men like "Cece" Cross, '17, the great
shot putter, who also had a "B" aver-
age in his work would be likely can-
didates for the honor.
DUAL MEET WITH NOTRE DAME
NEXT ON WOLVERINE SCHEDULE
With Notre Dame slated as the next
opponent, Coach Farrell had his en-
tire squad out, and sent them thru
the usual routine of the afternoon
workout yesterday. Steve plans to
give stiff practice sessions for the re-
mainder of the week, as he says that
the team will have to work hard to
win from the Catholics.
Due to a mistake in the rating of
Lindstrom, a junior, 10 points were
given to the sophomore tot'al, which
rightly belonged to the juniors. These
additional 10 counters place the jun-
iors in second position, and drops
the freshmen back a notch.
TWO FRESHMAN TEAMS PUT
ON 5.4 PRACTICE CONTEST
Five freshmen were drafted from
the yearling squad and with the re-
serves played the Varsity yesterday.
The remainder of the squad divided
up into two teams,with Jewell and
Kimball as pitchers and held a game
of their own. The first squad mana-
ged to win by the score of 5 to 4.
Coach Mitchell believes that he has
seen enough of the men to get a line
on their playing ability and will be-
gin drilling team-work into them
from now on. Karpus did particularly
well against the Varsity yesterday
afternoon getting two extra-base hits.
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA BEATS
DELTA DELTA DELTA, 1-4
In a spectacular game of baseball
staged in honor of the drafted men,
Kappa Kappa Gamma beat Delta
Delta Delta, 12 to 4. It was probably
the most exciting game of women's
baseball that has been staged this
season.
AVIATION PROMPTS

YOUNG INVENTORS
"Aviation is everybody's pet; every
layman has ideas for improvements
which he believes to be new," said
F. W. Pawlowski, professor of aero-
nautics in the engineering college,
yesterday afternoon in discussing the
lastest alleged improvement on exist-
ing types of airplanes. The new in-
vention consists of small wings de-
signed to act as brakes for slowing up
the progress of the machine.
"If it is desired to arrest the flight
of the machine," said Professor Paw-
lowski, "it is only necessary to 'stall,'
or tip up the nose of the plane until
it has slowed materially. This is ex-
ceedingly dangerous, as the controls
will not have effect unless a sufficient
speed is maintained."
Professor Pawlowski showed. the
same device in an aviation book pub-
lished in 1914 to illustrate his point.
"Only last week three inventors came
to me with devices that they thought
were original. One was an architect,
and another a physician. Only one o
the ideas was of any value, and that
had been discovered years ago," he
said.
It is the novelty of the whole science
that prompts so many untrained per-
sons to offer ideas on the subject,
according to Professor Pawlowski.

JEWISH SINGER PLEASES
AUDIENCE AT CONCERT

s

Senors

Despite the heavy downpour of rain
Sunday night, Sarah Caswell Angell
hail was filled to its capacity when
Elizabeth Gutman appeared for the
Menorah society in a concert of Jew-
ish music.
Opening the program with the sing-
ing of the "Star Spangled Banner,"
the famous Baltimore soprano was uni-
que and original, interesting and in-
tensely dramatic from start to finish.
Consisting as the program did of folk
songs rarely heard, the entertainment
was of unusual character. Miss Gut-
man presented the Yiddish and Rus-
sian songs with the sympathy of an
artist who felt and understood the
emotions and inner spirits of her art.
Miss Gutman proved to be not only
a singer of remarkable talent, but
also an actor and scene painter, as
well as interpreter of her own songs.
Her voice was clear, rich, and sympa-
thetic.
After the concert, Miss Gutman was
entertained at the home of Prof. and
Mrs. I. Leo Sharfman. She will ap-
pear at the University of Cincinnati
tomorrow.
IWHA'SGOING ON
TODAY
4:30 o'clock-Girls' Glee club meets
in Barbour gymnasium.
5 o'clock- Freshman girls' social
committee meets in Barbour gymnas-
ium.
7:30 o'clock-Jewish Student society
meets in room 204, University hall.
8 o'clock-Business meeting of Cer-
cle Francais in the Cercle rooms.
TOMORROW
7 o'clock-Fresh pep meeting in
physics amphitheater.
8:15 o'clock-May Festival concert
in Hill auditorium,
U-NOTICES
Act III of "The Silver Box," will re-
hearse at 7 o'clock tonight in Univer-
sity hall.
Members of the Adeph house of
representatives wishing to attend the
club's annual "wienie" roast are ask-
ed to assemble in front of the soci-
ety's bulletin board at 5:45 o'clock to-
night in University hall.
STU1)1ENrl DRAFT EADERSARE
SENT BACK TO ANN ARBOR
Max Frocht, former member of the;
University, and Elwood Moore, former
student at the Ann Arbor high school,
who were convicted and sentenced to
the Detroit house of correction last
year for refusing to register in ac-
cordance with the selective service
law, were released Saturday, and im-
mediately taken into custody by
Thomas O'Brien, chief of police of
Ann Arbor, by the order of the local
selective service board yesterday
morning, to determine their standing
in relation to the draft at the present
time.
Frocht claimed exemption on the
grounds of being an alien, in filling
out his questionnaire. The local board
reserves the right to postpone deci-
sion for five days, and until then he
was given orders to hold himself sub-
ject to strict surveillance.
Moore was inducted into service,
and will be sent to Camp Custer to-
day, as provided by the selective ser-
vice rules for the treatment of men
who are convicted of refusing to
register. Moore claimed exemption
from service on account of being a
Quaker, but County Clerk Edwin A.
Smith, clerk of the local board, holds
against him the court record in which

he made the claim of having no re-
ligion.
MR. BROWN
Offers men and women high-
est marketable prices for their
old clothes. Anything in the
of suits, overcoats, or shoes he will
take off your hands. Sell your old
clothes.- They are no good to you.
I can use them., You will get your
money's worth. No quibbling to buy
them cheap. Their absolute value will
paid. Men's and women's apparel
both. Call Mr. Claude-Brown at 210
Hoover Ave. Phone 2601. He will
gladly call at your residence.-Adv.
Play Ground, Indoor and Tennis
Balls at Cushing's.-Adv.
You will always 'ind bargains 13
Daily advertisements. Read thDem
read ars.-A Y.

ELIZABET H GUTMAN PRESENTS Labor, in its issue for May 10, contains

UNIQUE PROGRAM OF
FOLK SONGS

an address recently delivered by Prof.
Warren W. Florer, of the German de-
partment, state historian of the Mich-
ign society of the Sons of American
Revolution, at the convention of that
society.
Professor Florer said in part: "Our
society stands for a conservative re-
publicanism which recognizes indivi-
dual merit, social justice, and histori-
cal ballast. We grandsons of grand
'Sons of Liberty' should possess the
poise of calm deliberation and the ele-
mental forces of vital progress. For
generations our ancestors have ex-
tended the cordial hand of welcome to
the sorely oppressed of autocratic
Europe. It is our function to co-
operate in furthering the innate tal-
ents of our children and their children
so they will become progressive citi-
zens of a free republican state."
In referring to the present crisis,
Professor Florer said: "A firm hand
with a gentle touch is necessary in

Prices

Men's

$5.00 to $7.00
$3.00 to $6.00

L /

Women's

Our ability to bring to our customers
the best footwear at impressive saa-
ings is a well known truth.

I

/.

GET PREPARED AND
COOPERATE--FLORER
The Herald, a Detroit weekly pub-
lished for the Michigan Federation of

I

this great hour. The Sons of the
Anerican Revolution, descendants of
the master workmen of 1776, say to
all liberated men: Get prepared. Co-
operate with us. Work not only for
yourself and family, but help to make
the world safe for master workmen,
so that you may earn master's wages
in a free land."
ASSOCIATION TO HOLD FOUR
DAY CLINIC AT GRAYLING
Dr. E. R. Van der Slice, medical
field secretary of the Anti-tuberculosis
association of Michigan, left yesterday
afternoon for- Grayling, where he will
hold a tuberculosis clinic today, Wed-
nesday, Thursday, and Friday. Exam-
inations made at the clinic are free
of charge. At present they are held
in several of the larger cities of the
state at least once each month.
According to Mr. W. L. Cosper,
executive secretary of the association,
a clinic will soon be established in
Berrin county in either Benton Har-
bor, Niles, or St. Joseph. Mr. Cosper
is now in correspondence with the
Tourist club, of Dowagiac, who desires
to have a clinic in Cass county. The
establishment of a clinic in Van Buren
county is also under consideration.

GROSS & DIETZEL
119 East Washington

An unusual offering

I

of 5Ien 's Oxfords
Women's Oxfords
and Women's Pumps

Leave your orders now for
Engraved Cards,
Sheehan & Co.
n Arbor Detroit

.1

BUY
Hoover Steel Ball Stock
NOW

,.....

Victor Records

.

OF

May Festival Artists

GEO. H. FISCHER

I

ON SALE AT

312 National Bank Bldg.

Tel 1060

mn

haeberle & Son's Music House
So. Main Street Phone 254-F1

SENOS

a

GITYNEWS
e usual farewell demonstration
a street parade from the Court
e to the Michigan railroad sta-
will be given to the Ann Arbor
agent of drafted men who start
olumbus, Ohio, this morning at
o'clock. The parade will start
the Court House at 10:30 o'clock
e morning.
:atement of the financial condition
e city of Ann Arbor appears in
innual report of the city treas-
which appeared yesterday.
e assessed valuation is an addi-_

tion to the report this year which
will be of special interest. City Treas-
urer Ross Granger has added this to
the annual report for its informative
value and with it is a statement of
the tax rate, and the rate and valua-
tion, are reported for the last two
years so that a comparison can be
made.
Members of the common council met
last night as a committee of the whole
to prepare the city budget for the
coming year.
Department heads will meet at the
same time, and will be called into the
session as they are needed.
Watch The Daily Classified column.

Order your personal cards now
from the

I

MAYER-SCHAIRER CO
.112 SO. MAIN ST.

an

at Attractive Prices

11

SV JJO
FRATERNITIES

am constantly taking Used Kodais in exchange toward Neer
s, and, although we have use for all of them in our Rental De-
ant, we offer many of them at much less than their real value.
ow is the time to get your Kodak out and have it put in order for
mmer. Bring it to me for adjustment and cleaning.

Arrange for Your

l

GROUP PHOTOGRAPH

Unsurpassed Ac

PHONE 948-W

PHlOT

No. University Ave.

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