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May 12, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-12

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I

iX W ARtAU1B
'ODAY

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xttx

ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY 'AND NIGHT
SERVICE

No. 158.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 12, 1918.

PRICE T

ER AND
AS DAILY
H 918-9

NTROL ELECTS
MANAGERS IN

BUT

GARGOYLE
[NESS MANAGER

oiutments Left
i Treasurer with
er to Act

to

three positions on the stu-
blications were filled by the
s of tIle Board in Control of
Publications yesterday.
ice L. Roeser, '19, telegraph
f The Daily, was elected man-
litor for the coming year, and
Makinson, '21M, was re-elect-
tess manager. Walter S. Riess,
re-appointed business man-
the Gargoyle.
r was appointed to the staff of
chigan Daily among those
n Thanksgiving day, 1916. He
eporter during the remainder
ollege year. Last fall he was
night editor, remaining in that
until March of this year, when
appointed telegraph editor.
.son was made business man-
the remainder of the year fol-
the departure of C. Philip
and J. Ellsworth Robinson for
.ent service.
has been business manager
argoyle since N. H. Ibsen, '18E,
government service in Janu-
o other elections were an-
[ by the board at this time.
ntments for heads of the Wol-
vere left in the hands of the
n and business manager of the
ith power to act. A resolution
appointments other than those
Daily be subject to such salary
tment as the 'board may see
ake was passed.
board is contemplating the
of salaried positions for the
f the Inlander in an effort to
more interest in this publica-
the campus.

OBSERVE MOTHER'S
DAY, ASKS WILSON
Washington, May 11.-A nation's
unity tomorrow in reverence and in
homage to motherhood was asked to-
night by President Wilson in a Moth-
er's day message to the American peo-
ple.
Messages to American mothers also
were issued tonight by Secretary
Baker, Secretary Daniels, and Dr.
Anna Howard Shaw chairman, of the
Woman's committee, of council of na-
tional defense.
Elaborate preparations have been
made by the churches of Ann Arbor
for the observance of Mother's day.
Many have planned special programs
and all will devote some part of their
regular worship to the day set aside
by President Wilson as a day of rev-
erence and homage to the nation's
motherhood.
Every individual is urged to observe
the day in some fitting manner. The
cmstomary roses, colOred in honor
of living and white for the deceased
mothers will be worn.
D0 JOHN W LANGLEY,
NOTED SCENTISTIDIES
HELD HONORARY DEGREES IN
PHILOSPHY AND
MEDICINE
Dr. John William Langley is dead at
his home at 2037 Geddes avenue. The
funeral services will be held from his
late home. Dr. Langley was born in
Boston, Mass., October 21, 1841.
Dr. Langley was English, both his
father and mother coming from Eng-
land. He was well known as a scien-
tist and as an author. He began his
education in the Chauncey high school
of Boston, and the Milton high school,
At nineteen years of age he received
a degree of bachelor of science from
Harvard University. In 1861 he en-
tered the University of Michiga as a
medical student. Dr. Langley held
many responsible positions 'during the
next fifteen years.
As an author, he ranked with the
best. He belonged to the American
Association for the Advancement of
Science, and the American Society of
Mining Engineers. He was a cor-
responding member of the British As-
sociation for the Advancement of
Science, and an honorary member of
the New York Academy of Science
and of the Engineering Society for
Western Pennsylvania. Many scien-
tific and engineering papers have been
written by Dr. Langle'.
In 1877 the University of Michigan
conferred upon him the honorary de-
gree of doctor of medicine, and in 1892
that of doctor of philosophy.
Dr. Langley is survived by a wife
and three children, Mrs. Mary W.
Herrick of Cleveland, Mrs. M. L. Whit-
man of Pittsburg, and Samuel Pier-
pont Langley, living at home.
War Department Locates New Camps
Washington, May 11.-The war de-
partment will offer a military train-
ing course of one month beginning
June 3, to 6,500 college students, selec-
ted from 120 institutions. The camps
will be located at Plattsburg, N. Y.,
Fort Sheridan, Ill., and the presidio,
San Francisco.

BORGLUM CLAIMS-
CHARGES UNTRUE
Declares Governinent Resorted to Sub-
terfuge to Delay Investi-
gatioii
"ONlY TWO COMPANIES READY
TO ilAKE PLANES FOR V. S."
Received Tip That "Administration
Possessed Club to Put Hit
Out of Business"
Washington, May 11.-Gutzon Bor-

Elizabeth Gutman, Master of
and Russian Folk Songs
Appear

FAMOUS SOPRANO
TO SING TONIGHT

Yiddish
to

CONCERT WILL BE HELD IN
SARAH CASWELL ANGELL HALL
Is to Be Free to Public; Held Under
Auspices of Menorah
Society
Elizabeth Gutman, the Baltimore

glum, sculptor, accused of having I soprano and master of the Jewish folk

sought to capitalize his friendship
with President Wilson by organizing
a private airplane plant, issued a,
formal statement yesterday denying
any connection with any airplane pro-
duction concern.
Government Resorts to Subterfuge
He further declared that the govern-
ment had resorted to every subterfuge
to delay the investigation of aircraft
production in which "a billion dollars
in 11 months has provided us with
no planes." Borglum stated further
that he had received information from
a confident of the President that "the
administration now possessed a club
that would put me out of business if I
did not quit."
"There is a graver question arisen,"
said Mr. Borglum, "Who is it thatis
so powerful, and where are they, that
make it impossible and dangerous to
the character and honor of inen who
dare to ask this question?"
Orders Are Being Held Up
In oral remarks supplementing his
typewritten statement, the sculptor
said that there were only two con-
cerns, the Wright-Martin and the Cur-
tis companies, prepared to make fly-
ing craft for America. These two com-
panies could have propuced 5,000 ma-
chines and the United States could
havesfrom3,000 to 4,000 in France for
the spring drive, he said, if they had
been permitted to go ahead with the
orders they had already received.
Red Cross to Launch New Campaign
The Red Cross committee of Wash-
tenaw county is about to launch a
new campaign May 21. Mr. H. W.
Douglas, chairman of the committee,
has announced that a large parade
will open the campaign officially.
Two days after this, every one will be
given the opportunity to subscribe
voluntarily. A house-to-house can-
vass will then be made.
There will be 200 Red Cross nurses
in the parade. Nine booths and 195
school districts, from all parts of the
county, will be represented. Ann Ar-
bor's quota is $13,000.
Prof. Schull Plans Crop Inspection
Prof. A. F." Schull, of the zoology
department, left yesterday morning
for Lansing to confer with the secre-
tary of the Michigan Crop associa-
tion regarding the work to be done
by it this sumer.
The association inspects the crops
intended for seed each year in order
to insure an adequate supply of the
more productive varieties of seed for
the next year,. "Such inspection is
of unusual importance now, in view
of the food situation," said Professor
Schull.' Professor Schull will return
Monday to meet his classes.

songs, appears at 8 o'clock tonight
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, at a
concert given under the auspices of
the Menorah society.
First Presentation of Yiddish Songs
Miss Gutman is now on a tour of the
western universities in the interest of
the Menorah movement. Her appear-
ance in Ann Arbor marks the first
presentation of Yiddish and Russian
songs before a university audience.
Herself of American parentage, Miss
Gutman first became interested in this
music when Russian political refugees
began to flock to this country. She
has made a special study of the Russ-
ian language, and has made her work
original, unique, and enjoyable.
The program arranged for tonight's
concert contains a variety of songs
typical of ghetto life. Several of the
national songs present the Jew of the
nineteenth century, struggling for rec-
ognition and equality under the bur-
den of autocratic oppression. Most
of the songs reveal the religious spir-
it of the race.
has Appeared with Tolstoy
The first mark of distinction that
the singer has gained from the mus-
ical critics of this country came to
her when she appeared as on intepre-
tor of Russian music during the lec-
ture delivered by Count Ilya Tolstoy
in New York city on "The Russian
Revolution." Count Tolstoy suggest-
ed that that particular event would
be incomplete without the appeal of
some of his native music. The selec-
tion of Elizabeth Gutman as an Am-
erican soprano is therefore considered
as a recognition of her intense drain-
atic and musical ability.
Miss Gutman will be accompanied
by Dence Leedy at the piano. Ad-
mission to the concert is free and open
to the University and public.
A. A. SAVINGS BANK WILL
RECEIVE STEERE WATER BONDS

GERMANS SAY U.S.
ARMY IS MUTINOUS
Washington, May 11.- A German
wireless message saying that grave in-
subordination is a daily occurrence in
American army training camps was
made public today by the state de-
partment, as an illustration of the
length to which the German govern-
ment is going in an an effort to keep
up the spirits of the civil population.
The message said: "According to
in formation from Christiania, Nor-
wegians recently arriving from Ameri-
ca says that grave cases of insubordi-
nation occur daily in American train-
ing camps. At first breaches of dis-
cipline were punished by daeth.
This was stopped because of the large
number of cases,"
NIGHT IN JA N" HAS
APPRECIATIVE -AUDIENCE

HUN~S SEEM LOAT[
TO RENEW OFFENS1
UN61W ITRLN FRON
BERLIN REPORTS AMERICA?
SUSTAFNED HEAVY LOSSES
AT APREMONT
GENERAL MAURICE
PUT ON RETIRED PA
Allied Air Forces Have Shown Th
Superiority During the Entire
Week
London, May 11.-The army coun
having considered the explanati
tendered by Gen. Frederick D. Ma
ice, has decided that he shall be p1y
ed forthwith upon retired pay.
Berlin, via London, May 11.-Hea
losses were inflicted on the Americ
troops, southwest of Apremont a
north of Parroy by a strong mine bc
bardment, according to the offic
communication from general he
quarters today.
Rome, May 11. - Italian tro
stormed Montcornet and took ab
100 prisoners, two guns and four i
chine guns Thursday, according to
official statement issued by' the v
office today.
Paris, May 11.-The Germans
tacked the French lines today al
violent artillery fire southwest
Mailly-Raineval, and gained a si
section of territory which was retal
by the French by a brilliant cour
attack, according to the war office
nouncement tonight. The Germ
suffered heavy casualties.

JIU-JITSU AND FENCING
SUCCESSFUL OF FEA-
TURES

MOST

What was supposed to be " Night in
Japan" was transformed into a rather
modern musical event when the Cos-
mopolitan club concert was presented
at Sarah Caswell Angell hall last
night.
Except for the Japanese flute solo,
by M. Uyehara, of the School of Music,
and the demonstrations of jiu-jiutsu'
and fencing, by Bunzaburo Sashida,
'20, I. Nishimurd, and Dr. Watanabe
Uyehara, there was little strikingly
Japanese about the event, the first
part of the program was made up of
musical selections,
The "Koto" music featured for the
concert was arranged for the piano
and played by Mr. Albert Lockwood,
of the School of Music. Miss Ada
Grace Johnson sang "Beautiful Japan,"
and a selection from "Madam Butter-
fly." The part of the program listed
as "An Excursion Through Japan"
was made up of a series of slides
showing different. Japanese scenes
which were explained by Sotokichi
Katsuizumi, grad.
In- an address entitled "The Ex-
tent of Democracy in Japan," Katsui-
zumi told the audience that although
constitutionally there was little de-
mocracy in Japan, the movement for
democracy is gradually growing.
The audience seemed to be pleased
with the parts that especially presented
traits of Japanese life. The success of
the concert can particularly be at-
tributed to the demonstrations of jiu-
jiutsu and Japanese fencing.

EN FRASER TO SPEAK IN
CIENCE AUDITORIUM MAY

201

Helen Fraser, author of "Women
.d War," will speak at 8:15 Monday,
ay 20, in the auditorium of the Natur-
Science building. Through the ef-
rt of President MacCracken of Vas-
r college she has been brought to
is country, and is commended as an
cellent speaker.
Prior to the War, Miss Fraser, as
member of the non-militant suffrage
oup, was engaged in lecturing on
ffrage and social subjects through-
t Great Britain. Since then she has
en continuously engaged in lectur-
g and war work of various kinds.
Her Ann Arbor talk is entitled,
Vomen's Part in Winning the War."
nrtmouth Campaigns for Freshmen
"Bring back a freshman next
ar" is a slogan with the undergradu-
es at Dartmouth. A campaign is
ing launched by the alumni council
that university this spring to urge
I undergraduate students who re-
rn next fall to bring a freshnan
th them and in that way insure a
11 quota for next year.
This movement was prompted also
r an appeal recently sent out by Pre-
lent Wilson which stated, "I would
,rticularly urge upon the young peo-
e who are leaving our high schools
at as many of them as can do so,
ail themselves this year of the op-
irtunities offered by the college and
cbnical schools to the end that the.
untry may not lack an adequate
pply of trained men."
?rof. Kraemer Gives Talks in West
of. Henry Kraemer of the pharmacy
llege has returned from a trip to
ncoln, Neb., where he delivered a
ries of addresses, on the occasion
the tenth anniversary of the found-
g of -the pharmacy college of the
niversity of Nebraska. Prof. Krae-
er delivered the oration before the
Ui Beta Kappa society, speaking on
Kultur versus Culture," and deliver-
s other addresses on the work of the

The committee handling the Steere
water bonds has reported that the Ann
Arbor Savings bank has given the
highest bid for the entire issue. The
committee will arrange for and re-
commend the sale of bonds to that
bank. There are $200,000 of these
bonds issued for five years.
They are five per cent bonds, matur-
ing May 15, -1923. The bid from the
savings bank was a satisfactory one,
offering a bonus of $1,000; in addition
to two per cent interest on daily bal-
ances of the unused portion of the
money on deposit in that bank, with
the privilege of drawing on account
at any time.
Halsey Stuart & Co., of Chicago,
offered to take the bonds at par, if
the city 'would pay to that firm $1,000
from the general city funds, for the
expenses of printing the bonds, mark-
eting and attorney fees.

Women's League Mixer Draws Crowd
More than 300 students forgot the
library, the boulevard, and movies,
long enough yesterday afternoon to
attend in the all-campus mixer in Bar-
bour gymnasium. Even to passers-
by, who would have their way unim-
peded, the strains of Ike Fischer's or-
chestra floated out, and usually suc-
ceeded in enticing them in. At any
rate, the Women's league, under whose
auspices the dance was given, repor-
ted the proceeds as highly satisfac-
tory.
The chaperones for the occasion
were Mrs. Underwood, Mrs. Hessler,'
Mrs, Lewerenz, Miss Louise Potter,
and Miss Agnes Wells.

(By Associated Press)
May 11.-Another week has pass
without a renewal by the Germans
the offensive they began March 21.
Ever since the costly defeat of Ge
eral von Arnim's army nearly tv
weeks ago the beginning of a new e
fort by the enemy has been looked fo
Possibly the' Germans have been wa
ing for some allied counter blc
which'they felt able to withstand a:
therefore hoped would be dealt.
General Foch Waiting
If this was the case, they must ha
been disappointed by the waiting at
tude of General Foch which, it is fe
now will compel the enemy to reve
his further purpose with little delay
Every day gives evidence of t
alertness of the Allied forces. Nu
erous minor operations have been u
dertaken to improve their positio
on the various fronts. Airplane rat
without number, in which the st
eriority of the entente air forces h1
been clearly shown, have served t
same end besides being notably pi
ductive of valuable information.
Allies Better Positions
Betterment of the Allied positio
reported yesterdayninclude an da
vance by the French on the Flande
front in 'the neighborhood of Loc
where the approaches to Mont Rout
one of the bulwarks of the Allied lin
have thereby been made more secu
Indications are multiplying th
Germany's position in the East
causing her uneasiness. She is t
ported to have effected sensibly t
sentiment of the Bolshevik whose
tempts to weld into shape an art
the Germans are attempting to thwa
Ukraine Situation Disturbing
In the Ukraine the situation is ev
more disturbing, according to curre
dispatches which announce a growi
anti-German sentiment because of t
repressive measures of the Teutoi
To meet this additional Germ
troops are being sent to the disturb
regions.
Troops of the national army of t
United States paraded through Lo
don on Saturday, three battalions
them to the plaudits of large crow
and the compliments of King Geor
Premier Lloyd-George, and other n
ables.
Student Secretary Speaks Tonigh
Miss Sara Snell, traveling secret
for the student volunteer moveme
who is making a tour of colleges
the central West, will speak at 6 :
o'clock Sunday evening to the Studer
at the Congregational church.
Miss Snell has visited Michigan
other times. and comes with a messa

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE,
BISHOP F. J. MCCONNELL
(Of Denver. Colorado)
'Observations on the Western Front'

MOTHER'S

DAY

Presbyterian Church, 10:30 A.M.
Huron and Division Sts.

TONIGHT
7:30

Methodist Church

TONIGHT
7:30

STUDENTS CORDIALLY WELCOMED

F' ______________________________________________________________________________________________'I '.
m b
U U

MENORAH CONCERT
JEWISH MUSIC

8 O'CLOCK
TONIGHT

Admission
Free

Elizabeth Gutman
SOPRANO

SARAH CASWELL
ANGELL HALL

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