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May 11, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-11

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 11, 1918.

,
_. .,

BELL, 919, CHOSEN
OPERA CHAIRMAN
F. C. Bell, '19, will be general chair-
man of the 1919 Union opera, accord-
ing to an announcement made yester-
day by the Union. Other appoint-
ments are as follows:
Assistant to the general chairman,
C. C. Dinwiddie, '20E; stage manager,
W. P. Favorite, '20; master of cos-
tumes, C. M. Norton, '19E; master of
properities, C. J. Sullivan, '19E; ad-
vertising committee, Paul Cholette, Jr.,
'20L, chairman, and William Wachs,
'21; chairman of publicity, Mark K.
Ehlbert, '20; and chairman of music
publishing, Sherwald Sedgwick, '19.
Other appointments to committee.
ships will be made next semester

EPS CAMP
R; THREE HURT

W I .A

GE IN STATE EXCEEDS
FINDREDS THOUSANDS
OF DOLLARS

Detroit, May 1.-Damage expected
di:- to total several hundred thousand dol-
lars resulted from the wind and elec-
trical storm which swept southern
21, Michigan early tody. As wire service
be- began to reco r rom the effects of
the the storm, which blew down poles and
one- tied up communication throughout the
ince state, reports following the destruc-
n tL tion of barns, farm buildings, and
eich fruit trees, began to be received..
the Aside from the slight injuries re-
ven geived by three Camp Custer soldiers,
oPO- no casualities were reported. Dam-
ear- age at the cantonment amounted to
several thousand dollars when some
stacks were blown down. The storm
hese swept across the lower part of the
ber- state.
ular
here CADET CHOSEN FOR
nain
aitn JUNIOR PLATTSBURG
for -
Hobart Smith, '20E, has been chosen
und by President Harry B.. Hutchins to
our receive a free scholarship in this sum-
loss mer's camp at Junior Plattsburg.
end Before coming to Michigan Smith
side had two years at Culver military aca-
the depy, Indiana, and he is now a mem-
Ler." ber of the R. 0. T. C.
President Hutchins, as a member
[S of the advisory board of Junior Platts-
burg, was invited to name one of 25
SST cadets who will be similarly chosen
from other schools to act in the capa-
rom ety of leaders in the camp.
ight The scholarships include quarters,
bat- subsistence, and military training
tate This offer of 25 free scholarships was
The made possible by the generosity of the
even citizens of Plattsburg who are in sym-
has pthy with the work that is being
done there.
ner-
was INCLEMENT WEATHER HOLDS,
id a DOWN '18 SING ATTENDANCE
)ean Inclement weather held down .the
ses- attendance at the second Senior Sing
the last night, comparatively few seniors
orge being present
art- The Varsity Band furnished the
greater part of the evening's enter-
tainment. Its numbers were received
with hearty applause.
UB$S
Ilot Dog Roast is Prize for Contest
self A hot. dog roast will be given to-
tive day at Cascade Glen to the Christian
cie- Endeavor society of the Congrega-
also tional church by side "B" which has
lost in the recent membership atten-
, in dance contest to side "A", the total
im- new members being 275.
3 to- The party will leave Westminster
n in at 4:30 o'clock some going road and
ests, others in canoes. Music and a good
full time has been promised; rain or shine.
ates
Y. X. C. A. Prints Russian Paper
New York, May 10.-A weely news-
paper printed in Paris under the aus-
)AY pices of the Y. M. C. A. Is one of the
means which has been adopted to
sale cheer three battalions of Russian sol-
g in diers who, although still fighting for
r of the .Allies, have been ostracised by
and their comrades due to the collapse of
ad a Russian democracy.
;e it
nal Columbia Shows Deflcit
pos- Columbia university shows a deficit
for this year of $250,000 due to the
falling off in student enrollment in-

FORTY TDNS
Recommended by Lieut. teorge C. Mid-
Len for Fourth Officers' Train..
Ing Camp
MEN WILL BE NOTIFIED NEXT
WEEK; ARE TO REPORT MAY 15
Pick 15 Additional as Substitutes for
Those Falling to Pass Ex.
aiminatons
Forty University students, includ-
ing a number who have already grad-
uated or entered, the service, have
been recommended by Lieut. George
C. Mullen for the fourth officers' train-
ing camp to .be held at Camp Custer.
The men will receive notification of
their recommendation within the next
few days, and will report at Camp
Custer on May 15. No arrangements
have been made for the departure.
The men will not leave in a body.
Men Recommended
The following men were recom-
mended for the camp:
James P. Adams, '19; L. W. Butter-
field, '19; Cyril E. Bailey, '17; medical
school at Washington, D. C.; Charles
P. Beath, '19E; Victor C. Dibble, '20L;
Joseph N. Davies, '20; George W. Em-
ery, '18; Harold IM. Easley, '18L; Ern-
est L. Emerson, '18; Arthur A. Guet-
tel, '18; A. G. Gabriel, '18; Arthur W.
Grant, '20; Robert B. Gotfredson, '18;
Welland Gay, '18E; James L. Hess, '19;
Albert E. Horne, '18; H. E. Johnson,
'17L; Laylin K. James, ex-'18; Camp
Custer; Ralph Karl, spec., Camp Sher-
idan; William S. Kammerer, '18L;
Harley C. Keen, '19.
Arthur L. Kirkpatrick, '18; Arthur
E. Latir, '18L; Russell S. McNeal, '19E;
Ralph A. McGinnis, '17L; M. E. Mc-
Gowan, '21; Lawrence S. Martz, '18E;
Robert T. Monroe, '18; L. W. Page,
'19E; Joseph W. Planck, '18; John C..
Post, '19; Hilton Nowlen, '19; Leon-
ard W. Neiter, ex-'19L, associated with
the hospital corps at Newport News,
Va.; Thomas M. Rybolt, '18; Ward B.
Sickler, '18E; Chase B. Sikes, '17; am-
bulance corps at Allentown, Pa.; Har-
old L. Smith, '16; W. G. Slawson, '19;
Morrison E. Taylor, medical depart-
ment of the national army at Fort
Oglethorpe, Ga.; and Arch P. Wilson,
'20.
Appoint 15 Substitutes
A list containing the names of more
than 15 students, who will be order-
ed to report at Camp Custer in case
any of the 40 students recommended
for a commission fail to pass the ex-
aminations, has been compiled by
Lieutenant Mullen. The list will be
announced later.
. This is the first time since the Un-
ited States entered the war, that it
has asked for a definite number of
Michigan men. A number of students
left the University for the third offic-
ers' training camp at Camp Custer,
but no definite quota was allotted.
Staff Elect 10 to Educational club
At a recent meeting of the staff
of the department of education the fol-
lowing junior women were elected to
membership in the Girls' Honorary
Educational club; Edith Alton, Mar-
garet Anschutz, Doris Cline, Helen
Davis, Blanche Goodell, Edna Gordan,
Marion Hays, Eva Herzberg, Mildred
Rendel, and Ella Rasmussen.
Party Proeeds for Belgian Babies
Proceeds of the card party which
will be given at 2 o'clock this afternon
at the Delta Gamma sorority will be

collected for the Belgian babies. The
money will be contributed through the
national' chapter with similar dona-
tions from all the chapters.
Capt. G. It. Coulter Arrives in France
Capt. Glenn M. Coulter, ex-'18L, has
arrived in France, according to a post-
card received yesterday by Homer
Heath, '07, general secretary of the
Union. Coulter is with the army am-,
bulance service. 1

grams from the files of the arnm in-
telligence service were read in the
senate today to show that G. Borgun,
while holding a personal commission
from President Wilson to inquire into

the government aviation plan, was corporation.

war contracts.
The sculptor,.-who has been the chief
critic of aircraft officials, is represent-
ed as seeking for himself a . position
as silent partner in the proposed new

BRITISH
OF

MASpS PLAY IMPRES
IN SECOND PRUCTION

JIU IITSU IS FEATUR
1IN TONIGHT'S CONCERT

ENEMY MAY WI
SUBS TO HOT
French Attack Grivesnm
Long in German Ih
Fighting Near

EXCELLENT
SHOWN

STAGE.
BY CAST
NIGHT

PRESENCE
LAST

JAPANESE ENTERTAINMENT
FERS WIDE MUSICAL
PROGRAM

OF.

Washington, May 10.- Sensational negotiating secretly for the formation
sworn statements, letters, and tele- of a private airplane company to take

'The second performance of the
"Amazons" was presented last night
before an enthusiastic audience in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The few
rough places that charaterized
Thursday night's performance were
entirely lacking, all three acts pro-
gressing with a maximum of smooth,
clever action, and excellent stage pre-
sence.
Stars of Play
It, would be difficult to select in-
dividual stars from what proved to be
practically an all-star cast represent-
ing some of the best talent on the
campus. Jennie Jacobs, '19, who play-
ed the leading role as Lady Noeline
Belturbet, shared close competition
with both of her "Amazon" sisters. Lois
May, '18, in particular, almost consT3-
ced the audience that she was a "real
boy." It is safe to asert that Beatrice
Fales, '18, as Viscount Litterly, satis-
fied every requirement to be made of a
typical hero of romance.
Humor of Production
The humor with which the play
abounds was fairly well brought out
by Melba Bastido, '19, in the part of
Andre, the French count, and by La
Verne Ross, grad.' as Sergeant Shuter.
Winnifred Parsons, '19, as the Earl of
Tweenways, demonstrated the most
professional acting of the entire cast,
and kept her audience in constant
laughter over her thoroughly good
interpretation of the difficult role.
U. S. MARINES IN FRANCE
ACQUIRE NEW SOBRIQUETS
Paris, May 10.-U. S. Marines in
France are rapidly acquiring new so-
briquets.
The Germans, terrorized by their
maniacal fighting, have dubbed these
Americans, "Devil Dogs."
But the French who have come In
contact with the marines refer to
them as "the millionaire soldiers,"
due to the fact that marines are do-
stantly dividing their pay with the
French women and children who need
help. In many instances marines
have been known to give up their en-
tire month's pay to purchase food
for destitute French families.
And the marines are proud of both
titles.
69 MORE NANNES ANNOUNCED
IN SECOND CASUALTY LIST
Washington, May 10.-A second
casualty list issued tonight by the
war department contains 69 names,
divided as follows:
Killed in action, 4; died of wounds,
4; died of accident, 2; died of disease,
9; died of drowning, 1; wounded
severely, 20; wounded slightly, 26;
prisoners, 3.
Among the names included in the
list of those wounded is that of Char-
les Joseph Jelsch, of Romeo, Mich.
Allied Losses for April Decrease
Washington, May 10. - Official
French statistics on a submarine war-
fare reprisal in a dispatch from France
today shows that the total losses of
Allied and neutral ships, including ac-
cidents at sea, were approximately:
only one-half as great during April
this year as in April 1917.

Featuring Japanese music, an illus-
trated trip through Japan, and exhi-
bitions of genuine Japanese jiu jitsu
and fencing, "A Night in Japan," to
be presented by the Japanese students
of the Cosmopolitan club at 8 o'clock
tonight in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
promises to be one of the bright spots
on the club's calendar for the year.
Katsuizuml to Speak
Following a piano selection by M.
Uyehara, of the School of Music, and?
a selection from the opera, "Madame
Butterfly," to be sung by Miss Ada
Grace Johnson, of the School of Music;
faculty, Sotokichi Katsuizumi, '17,
who has had considerable experience
in American speechmaking, will give a
talk on "The Extent of Democracy in
Japan."
Children's Songs
A group of Japanese children's songs
will be given by Mr. Albert Lockwood,
of the School of Music faculty, who1
will also play a piano arrangement of
Japanese "koto" music. Several
slides of scienis Japan will be shown
and Miss Johnson will sing "Beautiful1
Japan," accompanied by Mr. Otto J,
Stahl.
Jiu Jitsu Tactics
Following a flute solo by M. Uye-
hara, of the School of Music, there
will. be a demonstration of jiu jitsu
tactics by Bunzamura Sashida,.'20,
and Hachbei Nishmura, '21. The pro-
gram will be closed with a fencing
match between two teams composed
of Sashida, Nishimura, Uyehara, and
Dr. Ichiro Watanabe, of the Medical
school.

(By Associated Press)
German submarine operat
the harbor of Ostend Belgiu
been seriously hampered for a
not rendered impossible by a
raid made on the harbor by t
ish, Friday morning. An offici
ment issued by the British a<
says the channel leading out
inner harbor has, been bottle(
the old cruiser Vindictive, wh
brought into position under he
and sunk by bombs. It appea
ever, that the entire channel i
ed. One report says that th
lies at an angle, and does
solutely bottle up the channel,
Germans Say ald Falti
The German official staten(
cerning the raid says that the
was a failure, and that the
the vessel lies outside of the
traffic. This report may be
ed to the one issued April 24,
following the raid of Zeebrugg
claimed that no damage was
the mole or to' the harbor.
quent events have proved I
damage done to theraid on ,
was of -a serious nature.
It is pointed out that the
tion in the channel at Ostend v
eventually to close the harbor
the action of the tide and tU
silting effects of the harbor..

Senate Investigates Air Plan

( N N L IO N O S T E NIT S O

REPORT CH
INNER HA

If Ostend and ZE
ed as ports from
U-boats operate, t

Tickets are on sale at Wahr's book 782 squar
store and may also be secured from admsquare
members of the Cosmopolitan club or admiral I
at the door. ed that t
____ ___ ____ ___be. met b3
that he h,
PROF. W. H. HOBBS RE-ELECTED bor of Os
MEMBER OF SECURITY LEAGUE laying of
mind whe
Dr. William H. Hobbs, professor of Loo"
geology and director of the geologi- Military
cal laboratory and geological museum, al fightin
and chairman of the Ann Arbor sectors.
branch of the Security league, was re- Itthpark

elected a member of the league's ex-
cutive committee, at the annual meet-
ing of the National Security league,
held Thursday night in the Metropoli-
tan opera house, New York.
Prof. Claude H. Van Tyne, of the
history department, was one of the
newly elected members of the commit-
tee. The meeting was the largest and
most enthusiastic of the kind ever
held in that city, according to reports.
Elihu Root, who succeeded Joseph H.
Choate as honorary president of the
Security league, presided. In his
address he laid emphasis on the neces-
sity of non-partisan support of the ad-
ministration in the coduct of the war.

front to

ments between
patrols on the Iti
Pope Benedict
29 as a day to
Catholic churche
day for prayers I
stored to the wo
TECHNIC TO F]
OF ENGI

Photogral
engineering
military sf

Bishop McConnel Speaks .Tomorrow special
"Y. M. C. A. Work in France" will official
be the subject of the lecture to be college,
given by Bishop Francis C. McConnell May 20.
tomorrow at Lane Hall. Bishop Mc- In co
Connell has just returned froni a respond
justretrnedfro. aganized'
three months' stay in France where the Ted
he has been active in Y. M. C. A. War the Tec
work. . li

TODAY!

TODAY!

TODAY

ALL-CAMPUS MIXER

Barbour Gym.
Admission 25c'

Cadet Crashes Instant Death

,:00-5:00

Fort Worth, Tex., I
Harry Myers of Ohio c
death late today when
of his plane dropping f
of 1,000 feet near here

he

10.-

IKE FISHER

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