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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 08, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

W4

Sport Coats

ited Models in Flannel
and Knitted Fabrics

$8.50 to $12.50

Wadhams & Co.

TE STREET

MAIN STREET

YOU CAN PHONE US TO CALLI
for your flannel coat, house coat,
lounging robe, gloves, evening clothes
or anything else in your wardrobe, ex-
cept shoes, and we will send for them
II and after dry cleaning them by our
special process, return them to you
spick, span, immaculate and faultless.
Wise men employ us regularly to keep
their wardrobe looking new all the
time. They save a lot of money by
their wisdom.
ANN ARBOR STEAM
DYE WORKS

WOMEN MAYFINO WAYS
TO IMPROIE INOUSTRIES
JANE ADDAMS CLAIMS MANY
CONDITIONS CAN BE
BETTERED
Hot Springs, Ark., May 7.-Women
who take men's places because of de-
mands of war conditions, "have an
opportunity to improve at least some
of the methods" used in commerce and
industry according to Miss Jane Ad-
dams of Hull house, Chicago, who
tonight addressed the general feder-
ation of women's clubs on "The
World's Food Supply and Woman's.
Obligation." She cited the distribu-I
tion of milk as one instance in which
improvement might be made, said
women "certainly are under obliga-
tions to maintain labor standards,"
and added:
"It may be easier for them than it
is foi men to obtain some of these re-
sults on the same principle that it is
always easier to secure legislation
limiting the hours of women in in-
dustry than it is to secure the same
legislation for men.
Aspire to be Useful
"From the time we were little chil-
dren we have all of us, at moments
at least, cherished overwhelming de-
sires to be of use in the great world,
to play a conscious part in its pro-
gress. The difficutly always has been
in attaching our vague purposes to
the routine of our daily living, in
making a synthesis between our am-
bitions to cure the ills of the world
on the one hand and the need to con-
form to household requirements on
the other.
Women First Agriculturists
"Students of primitive society be-
lieve that women were the first agri-
culturists and were for a long time
the only inventors and developers of
its processes. The men of the tribe
did little for cultivating the soil be-
yond - clearing the space and some-
times surrounding it by a rough pro-
tectioo. In some tribes it became a
fixed belief that seeds would not grow
if planted by a man. In Central Afri-
ca to this day a woman may obtain
a divorce if her husband fails to pro-
vide her with a garden and a hoe.

SILK SHIRTS

FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL

AND

.ADIES CLOTHES
We give special attention
All laundered by hand

I.

No Job too Small or too Large
WASKENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If it's not right we make It right
-PHONE 273 -

oe Laun dry
PHONE 2355

MILITARY NEWS
Night classes, which are now being
held from 7 to 8 o'clock every even-
ing in Waterman gymnasium, will be
discontinued after May 10. The reg-
ular make up drills will be held from
2 to 3 oclock every afternoon, ex-
cept on Saturday, when they will be
held from 9 to 11 o'clock in the morn-
ing, and 1:30 to 4:30 o'clock in the
afternoon. The drills on Saturday
afternoon will take the form of a hike.
A lecture will be given at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium- if the blue flag is flying. In case
the white flag is up, drill will be hed
on Ferry field.
The following correct uniform regu-
lations were issued by the military
authorities last night:
The campaign hat is authorized, but
it is not required. It may be worn
with a blouse in rainy weather. All
other times, when the blouse is worn,
a cap is required. -
A woolen olive drab shirt is au-
thorized, but it is not required. When
an olive drab shirt is worn, the ser-
vice hat may also be worn. Under
no circumstances will an olive drab
shirt and cap be worn together.
Regulation R. o. T. C. uniforms,
blouse and cap, must be worn at
every drill.
Mr. F. E. Raymond, formerly. sta-
tioned at Camp Custer, will give bay-
onet training at 4:15 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon to all non-commissioned of-
ficers of the First regiment. Bayonet
it struction to the cadets of the Sec-
ond regiment will be given by Mr.
Ray-nond at 4:15 o'clock Thursday
afternoon.
WAR THROWS COUNTRY ON OWN
RESOURCES; ART IS DEVELOPED
Hot Springs, Ark., May 7.-War has
given a great impetus to art, especi-
ally to industrial art, Mrs. Cyrus W.
Perkins, chairman of the art depart-
ment of the general federation of
women's clubs, said tonight in ad-
dressing the biennial convention of
the federation here. The importance
of design in American commercial ac-
tivities was not realized generally, she
said, until our importations of furni-
ture, wall papers, carpets, laces, em-
broideries, pottery and glassware
failed to come across the seas. Then
it was that museum heads and art in-
structors met with the manufacturers
to meet the lack and classes in de-
corative design, exhibitions of old tex-
tiles and other art products, and art
lectures were multiplied.
Mrs. Perkins also pointed out other
activities of war times that had in-
creased the demands for artists and
revealed their importance to the well-
being of their countries. Posters were
needed in appealing for enlistments,
to increase food production and con-
servation, and to push the sale of
Liberty bonds. Artists with expert
knowledge of coloration, analysis of
light and color vibration were needed
for camouflage work.
In addition exhibits of collections of
foreign war posters with their univer-
sal appeal were brought to America
and by this means large sums were
raised for Red Cross work, and var-
ious war charities.

"Parents of today should encourage
the art instinct in children," Mrs.
Perkins said, "recognizing a talent
which properly directed insures more
than a modest livelihood; it insures
fame and fortune. To direct the tal-
ent for design and to cherish it for
the commercial . prosperity of our
country should be the parents' patrio-
tic duty."
BEAUTY SHOP
Miss Mable. Rowe. Shampooing,
Manicuring, Massage and Chiropody.
N. 5th Ave., Cor. Detroit St. Phowe
Open evenings by appointment. .33
2402.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.
Patronize our advertisers.-Adv.

Ice Cream is food
Ours is.

if it's made from pure and fresh ere
We know it because we make it.

LNeckties and Shi

Calkins
Drug
Co.

Fountain of Youth
Corner State and Liberty

mmmmmmmmmmm

The little
Vest Pocket Ka
is still the most popular
Have you seen the new
at $20.00 Come in.n

YOUR SPRING SUIT
will be carefully tailored of the new de-
pendable fabrics.
New Models distinctly our own.

Men's Furnishings
Varsity Toggery Shop
1107 S. University Ave.

"Snappy New"

GOLF SUITS

RIDING BR

Eat a Plate of our Ice- Cream

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

117 P6arI
Ypsilanti

ID. E. Grennan,
The Custom Tailor, 606 E. Libert'

Try our Chop Suey
Chinese and American Dishes

ECONOMY
must be accompanied by good
judgment, and depends on
SERVICE not Price
CURTIS
TIRES
give 6,000 miles of service
CURTIS TIRE &
RUBBER CO.
Muskegon, XNich. }
Radio Military Fountain Pens
Wrist Watchtes 3tu~n4i 'Ee v Waterman
$4.25 to $21 Ee a and ConKlin
U. of . Jewelry
Schianderer & Seyfried
C)JLEBRITIES HONOR MICHIGAN
GRAD AT FUNERAL CEREMONY
Philip H. Waters, '95L, Negro of
Charleston, West Virginia, was paid
tribute by the governor of the state
and many prominent state officials, at
his funeral services, as reported in the
Charleston Gazette. For many years
he held the position of assistant clerk
of the supreme court of the state.
"He was, in a sense, the friend of
every one he knew, and was the en-
emy of none. His entire life was
strewn with kindly acts and deeds
toward everyone. When Phil Waters'

WAI KING LOO
Jae Gin, Prop.

314 S.State St.

Phone 1244-M

life wenC out, many of our people
mourned, and many of them are weep-
ing now," said former Governor
George Wesley Atkinson.
The account in the Charleston Gaz-
ette in part reads: "Featuring the
church services were addresses by
former Governor Atkinson, President
George Poffenbarger, of the supreme
court of appeals, T. G. Nutter, Charles-
ton attorney, and the Rev. S. H.
Brown, of Harper's Ferry district,
Washington conference of the Meth-
odist Episcopal church."

I FIRE

IN ST. LOUIS CAUSES
LOSS OF ABOUT $8,000,000

St. Louis, May 7.-A fire which
started about 5 o'clock this afternoon
in a warehouse of the Independent
Packing company, in north St. Louis,
destroyed five storage houses of the
packing company, a large grain ele-
vator, a four story building, and a
number of small sheds.
The loss is estimated at between
$2,000,000 and $3,000,000. The cause
of the fire was undetermined.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.
You will always find bargains In
Daily advertisements. Read them..
readers.-Ad-v.

Marvel at Women's Leisure
"European visitors never cease to
marvel at the leisure of American
women, of the very sort from whom
club women are largely drawn. Thee
American woman is not, however, re-
lieved of her responsibilities and it
is well if she has so utilized her un-
pr"cedented leisure that at this mo-
ment, ifl response to a great crisis,
she is able to _enlarge her conception
of .duty in such wise that the con-
sciousness of the world's needs be-
comes the actual impulse of her daily
activities.
"We are told that when the crops
of grain and roots so painstakingly
produced by primitive women began
to have a commercial value that their
production and exchange was taken
over by men, as they later took over
the manufacturing of pottery and
other woman's early industries.
UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
TO GET THIRD ENSIGN SCHOOL
That the third ensign school of the
nation will be established soon at the
University of Washington is the report
given out by the navy department
through Rear Admiral Robert E.
Coontz.
An officers' school to provide en-
signs for the country's immediate de-
mands will be established, it is be-
lieved, by June 11. The course will
cover a period of four months and
will be very similar to that offered
now at the Great Lakes and the New.
York training stations.
The University of Washington is es-
pecially adapted for the purposes of an
ensign school since deep-sea vessels
are able to come to within a few yards
of the campus.
In addition to the special reserve
courses which will be offered there,
the regular four-year naval course will
be given.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. a . hapman's
I* Ine place. 1138 . Main.-Adv.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

indenburg Called
Second Napoleon
Von Hindenburg nas Deen termed
the second Napoleon.
In one of -the local lumber yards,
there appeared a picture of
Von Hindenburg with the words be-'
neath, "The Second Napoleon." Al-
though the portfait had been there
for some time, it had-escaped the pub-
lie gaze, until one of the naval auxi-
liary men, while on a short visit here,
made a trip to the yards to purchase
some lumber.
He had intended to procure paddles
for some honorary society, and while
on this mission, made this startling.
discovery. The consequence was that
very little time was lost in tearing the
portrait from its place on the wall,
and placing it where the lad thought
it ought to be.
A series of explanations followed on
the part of the owner of the picture,
and it was some time before he con-
vinced the lad that, it had been placed
there before the entrance of the United
States in the war, and that he had neg-
lected to- take it down. The lad at
length gave the man the benefit of the
doubt, and passed the matter on
peacefully.
Some one has offered to defend the
man by saying that Napoleon too was
defeated in the end.
NAME OF LIONEL CROCKR '18,
USED TO (SET FUNDS FALSELY
Lionel G. Crocker, '18, has a double
in New York, or at least someone who1
is using his name to get funds for
himself. The news is contained in the
current number of the Gothamite, a
monthly magazine published by the
University of Michigan club of New
York.
In a letter written to the Gothamite,
Charles A. Lunn, who is a lieutenant'
stationed in New York in the ordn-
ance department, writes that he was
approached by a man who gave the
name L. G. Crocker, and showed a
Michigan Union card with the name
on it.' He said that he was on his
way to, Washington, but that his money
had been stolen and that he was wait-
ing to hear from his family in Detroit.
Lunn believed his story, and ad-
vanced 'iim money to the-amount of
fifty dollars, after which "Crocker"
disappeared. Lunn then wrote to Dean
Effinger, asking for information about
Crocker.

OFFICERS'
UNIFORMS
516 E. William St.

Realize for yourse
pleasure of Home C
Food. Prices Reaso
Service Paramount.

Your Spring S)
will give you that

WELL-DRESSED

if made
by

TRUBE
218 S. Main Street

Loave opy
at
Quarry's and
Tke Delta

ASSI
DVERTt

IL

Leave -Cpy
at
Stadents'
Supply Store

Good Lunches of Rice and
all the time
Chineee and American COOP
Short Orders
Michigan Inn 601 E. L
The real Crocker, who is a se
the campus, and well known
dramatic ability, has been consi
annoyed by this use of his na
it has happened several othei
once in Portland, Me., and a
Boston. He has no idea. who
Union membership card. He
some time ago, and the find
evidently made good use of it.
Church Gives Annual Banquet
Prominent faculty and
speakers will participate in t
gram to be given at the annw
quet of the Congregational chi
6 o'clock Friday evening, May
the church parlors.
The banquet is given for a
gregational faculty and student
ald Knight Mirrieless, '20E, w'
severa solos.
Tickets are on sale at Wahr'

LOST.
T-A gold skull with letters A. S.
freek). Reward. 523 ackard St.
T-On north side of Huron river
black gage hat with curled quill.
al 313-J.
T- A brown army sweater-Re-
ard. Return to Michigan Daily.

WATED
WANTED- Young lady of pleasing
personality. Experience in meeting
the public to manage co-operative
educational work during the sum-
mer. Good salary to one who can
qualify. Address Box E. A., Mich-
igan Daily.I
We repair trunks. Koch and Henne.
Phone 50.-Adv.
WANTED - By young woman, em-
ployed, whose husband goes into ser-
vice July 1st-rooms for self and
child, 3 years old; also care of child.'

i

I

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor.
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS., 116*S. Main St.

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