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May 08, 1918 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IIVIL II
|EYE iN

WE

Glenn's Arm Still Too Sore
Allow Him to Play for
Several Days
PLANS ON USING KNODE
UILD HE RETURN IN TIME

SOROSIS DEFEATED
IN CLOSE CONTEST
Kappa Alpha Theta ran contrary to
all betting odds yesterday afternoon
by defeating Sorosis in one of the
fastest and most uniquely played
games of women's baseball this sea-
son.
Batteries for Theta were Emma
Riggs and Dorothy Williams, while
Florence Feld and Anna Lloyd held
the positions of responsibility for
Sorosis. Miss Alice Evans umpired
the contest.
Credit. must be given to Florence
Field for her executive ability and en-
ergizing efforts, as well as for the
way she put 'em over from low swift
ones to the high flyers.
The next game in the series will
occur this afternoon when Alpha Phi
and Gamma Phi Beta clash. Most of
the optimistic thoughts are being hung
on Alpha Phi.
Steve Wants Well
l7illed Entry, Lists

SIMPSON KAS MUCH TOF00
WITH SCHOLZS SUCCESS

Will Hurl for
Saunders Ready
of Need

Wolverines
in Case

Michigan and Indiana hook up this
afternoon in the third Conference
game of the year on Ferry field.
Indiana will attempt to even the
count on the series played between the
two teams with Jefferes in the box.
Jefferies is the best hurler on the
Hoosier .nine and in the last game
played between Michigan and Indiana,
Jefferies stood the Wolverines on their
heads for five innings.
Jefferies Strong
According to the players on the
Michigan team Jefferies compares fav-
orably with any other pitcher who has
faced Lundgren's crew this season.
He has plenty of speed and a big as-
sortment of curves, including a fast
shoot that is particularly bothersome.
Captain Glenn, who pitched the Wol-
verines to their six to nothing victory
at .Bloomington afew days ago, will
be unable to come back at the Hoos-
iers. Bob's arm is still sore from the
wrenching he received last Saturday
and It is doubtful whether he will be
in shape by Saturday.
Ruzicka Lundgren's Choice
Ruzicka will be Lundgren's choice
of twirler with Saunders held in re-
.serve. Ruzicka showed himself to be
in shape by his work against Chicago
last Friday but .the strain of hurling
such air-tight ball for nine innings has
counted against him and it is doubtful
whether he will be able to pitch shut
out ball again this afternoon.
Lungren is not sure whether Knod
will be on hand to play short this aft-
ernoon or not. Knode told the 'coach
he would not leave for Pittsburg un
til after the game today and other re-
ports said the star fielder had already
left. Lundgren is waking his plans to
play Knode.
Knode Valuable
There is no doubt but that the loss
of Knode would seriously hamper the
Varsity's chances for victory today.
Knode is ar. experienced man and he
and Adams manage to keep Mraz and
Garrett, the two green infielders, go-
ing in fine shape. The loss of Knode
would take just so much veteran mate-
rial from the team.
Lundgren has been working his men
hard at batting practice the past few
days. The Wolverines have been doing
some fair hitting but with the excep-
tion of Mraz and Knode the batting av-
erages of the men have been fattened
in the early games and they have been
falling off in the slugging the past few
games.
Coach Drives for Championship
The Michigan coach has been driv-
ing the players hard ever since the
last Chicago game to get them into
the bet of shape for the drive toward
the Conference championship. The
way in which the team went to pieces
in last' Saturday's game shows the
need of a tightening up all along the
line.
Michigan's lineup for this afternoon
as announced yesterday: Knode, ps;
Ad'ams, 1b; Ohlimacher, rf; Mraz, 3b;
Cooper, lf; Gilmartin cf; Garrett, 2b;
Morrison, c; Ruzicka, p.
The game will start at 4:05 o'clock.
Buy your alarm clocks at J. U
Chapman's, Jwelwr. 11 L Ma.
Ad.
Gasoline 25c, Polarine 50c. Staebler
& Co., 117 So. Ashley St.-Adv.

Entries for the inter-class meet are
coming in slowly, but Steve expects
to have the entry list well filled in
several days.
There will be 14 events, including
the 100 yard dash, 220 yard dash,
broad jump, 440 yard run, hand gre-
nade throwing, 880 yard run, high
jump, mile, pole vault, shot put, ham-
mer throw, discus, javelin, 120 yard
high hurdles, and 220 yard low hurd-
les. All these events have been part
of the regular program of out
door meets with the exception of the
javelin throw and grenade hurling.
Javelin Throw New Here
The javelin has been used by the
Conference schools for several years,
but this year will mark the first at-
tempt of the Maize and Blue -athletes
in throwing it. Several of Coach Far-
rell's men are working to acquire the
art, and up to this time Baker seems
to be throwing the missile the long-
est distance.%
Grenade throwing has only this year
been introduced into track and field
meets. Steve's squad has been some-
what handicapped in the training for
the event because of lack of space in
the gymnasium. Several of the Con-
fenence coaches have had men work-
ing at throwing all through the win-
ter.
Athletes Lack Accuracy
The chief difficulty that the athletes
who are trying out for the grenade
team seems to be the lack of ability to
control the flight of the bombs. The
missiles are thrown with a stiff arm
over hand motion, and no snap of the
elbow is allowed. There are three
distances to be thrown for, 75 feet,
100 feet, and 125 feet.
Lack 125 Foot Man
Most of the tryouts are able to
hurl the grenades far enough to hit
the first two targets, but Steve has
been having trouble in finding men
for the target at 125 feet. Of the re-
gular members of the track squad,
Haigh has been showing a lot of ac-
curacy and strength in his grenade
work. Xohn, Fortune, Goodsell of last
year's football team, and Emery, Mc-
Clintock, Cress, Boyd, put in their ap-
pearance in yesterday's practice.
From . this bunch, the Wolverine track
mentor ought to be able to pick men
who should garner a few points for
him in this event.
U. of W. Girls Enjoy Pigskin Sport
University of Washington girls who
are now being introduced into the in-
are now being intrdouced into the in-
tricacies of football. They practice
four hours a week and their team is
said to be quite formidable. The firt
regular game which they will stage
is scheduled for next week. It' is not
known whether or not the public will
be allowed to attend the game.

RUNNER WHO SHOWS HIS HEELS
TO THE WORLD ROOMMATE
OF HIS PREDECESSOR
Columbia, Mo., May 7.-When Rob-
ert Simpson finished his athletic ca-
reer at the University of Missouri
last year, a career that saw him a
world's champion in the hurdles, there
was speculation as to who would be
elected to carry the Gold and Black
of the school to further victories.
Bermond, Talbott, Thatcher, Nichol-
son and Simpson each in turn had
been more than state and Missouri
Valley conference champions.
Now comes Jackson Volney Scholz,
slender of build and 21, who appears
to be destined to uphold the prestige
establised by his predecessors. Several
weeks ago at Des Moines he flashed
the 100 yards in .09 4-5. Critics assert-
ed he was aided by a healthy wind,
so by way of proof he went to Phila-
delphia a few days later and at the
athletic carnival held by the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania he broke the
tape first in the 100 yard dash, show-
ing his heels to the best collegiate
runners in the country. His time was
ten seconds flat.
Scholz, when a boy of fourteen in
Los Angeles, began to show evidence
of being a sprinter, as numerous med-
als will testify. Later he came to St.
Louis and entered Soldan high school.
In 1915 he set a new high school re->
cord for the 100-yard dash when he
won the finals in the interscholastic
meet in 10 1-5 seconds.
When he entered the University of
Missouri three years ago Coach Henry
F. Schulte took Scholz, who up to
this had been winning races because
of his Iative fleetness, and taught
him the elementary principles of
"form."
Another contributing factor to
Scholz's success is Robert Simpson.
The Bosworth, Mo., champion took a
liking to the youngster and taught himfi
everthing he knew. The two roomed
together, trained together and it was
not longuntil Scholz assimilated the

ideas of training that had worked out
so successfully with Simpson, and
when the latter left school to go to
an army camp, Scholz was prepared
to shoulder the responsibility of being
the school's best athlete.
YEARLINGS SHOW
SOME IMPROVEMENT
Candidates for freshman baseball
showed a marked improvement in the
way in which they handled themselves
and the ball in the game against the
Varsity yesterday. Absences of sever-
al of the regular men made it neces-
sary for Mitchell to shift the lineup
and to play first himself.
Phenny around second is displaying
about as good a brand of baseball as
any man on the team. Addler the re-
gular first baseman was sent in at
third and seemed to have trouble in
pegging but came in fast for bunts
and covered the sask. Riddell, play-
ing shortstop, committed the grievous
error of failing to cover third when
Addler was going after a bunt, al-
lowing a runner to advance.
Jewell Shows Up Well
Jewell, the little southpaw, did the
hurling against Lundgren's hitters and
performed in a creditable manner.
Robbins caught but was prone to
juggle the ball in critical moments.
With a catcher like Genebach or Mor-
rison, Jewell should be able to do
good work in the box.
McGowan, Usher, and Hinkle were
playing the outfield positions but
these men seem to lack one of the
essentials for an outfielder, the ability
to hit. Usher struck out a couple of
times and the others did not collect
any hits off Leahy that caused him
to do any worrying about the result
of the game.
Ordnance Men go in Service"
Ordnance Sergeant C. F. Young, and
Privates George C. Thompson and A.
A. Darmstaetter, all former assistants
in the ordnance courses at the Uni-
versity, have been assigned to duty,
and have left for the operating stor-
age division at Patterson, N. J.
Officers' Raincoats made to order.
G. H. Wild, Tailors, State St.-Adv.

I

National League
Boston, 16; Brooklyn, 0.
New York, 7; Philadelphia, 3.
Pittsburg, 2; Chicago, 1.
St. Louis, 5; Cincinnati, 3.

YESTERDAY'S

Amerlean Leagi
St. Louis, 5; Detroit, 3.
Cleveland, 7; Chicago,1
New York, 9; Philadelp
Washington, 7; Boston,

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