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May 08, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-08

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I

LI NU.DJF UAIRl
TODA71

oVA6
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UIIMttl

DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

1IA cc

No. 154.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

ERTY DUELS
HT BY ALLIES
[I LS FRONT
S AND FRENCH CARRY
UCCESSFUL NIGHT'
RAIDS
ANS UTILIZED
,RENGTHEN LINES

Declares War on
inla Signs Peace
Central Powers

Germany;
With

London, May 7.-"Our own and the
enemy's artillery have been active
north of Lys, and have shown some
activity on other points of the battle
front," said Field Marshal Haig's re-
port from British headquarters tonight.
"There is nothing further to report.,
(By Associated Press)
Still anothe'r day has passed without
the Germans on the western front at-
tempting to begin a new phase of their
offensive. Everywhere along the line
Mhere have been artillery duels, at
some' points, ofconsiderable intensity,
and the Allied armies are lying in
their positions waiting with expec-
tancy.
There have been no infantry opera-
tions which have been considered fur-
ther than raids. Southwest of Arras,
the Canadians Monday night carried
out a successful stroke, killing a
number of Germans. The French in
the Amiens sector, also, were success-
ful in a similar manoeuvre.
Americans Help Strengthen Lines
Doubtless the heavy ground, due to
the rains, is holding back the prepara-
tions of the Germans. The Allied line
is being reinforced. The Americans
are taking a prominent part in the
strengthening of the line, according
to the French premier, who has just
hreturned to Paris from the battle
front. He is authority for the state-
ment that American troops are con-
tinuing to arrive in .the battle zone.
An indication of the heavy fighting
the British are being forced to re-
sp£nd to, is contained in the list of
isualties reported during the week
g Tuesday. This list shows a
,,of 38,691 of which 6,555 officers
and men were killed or died of
wounds. The casualties are the heavi-
est reported in any single week of
fighting..
England Aroused by Political Crisis
Considerable political turmoil has
arisen in England over charges made
by General Maurice, former director
of military operations at the British
war office, who recently was removed
from his post and sent to active duty
in the field, after he had made state-
ments which were considered to be
a reflection on General Foch, com-
mander-in-chief of the Allied army
on the western front.
In a letter appearing in a London
newspaper General Maurice charged
Andrew Bonar Law, chancellor of
the exchequer, and premier Lloyd
George, with having made statements
in the house of commons regarding
military matters. A special court of
inquiry is to investigate the matter.
Nicaragua Declares War
Nicaragua has declared war against
Germany and her allies. The entry of
the central American republic into
the war makes the twentieth antagon-
ist arrayed against the Teutonic al-1
lies.
The conclusion of peace reached
between Rumania and the central
powers, has finally been brought about
by the signing of a treaty at Bucharest
on Monday.
Issue Mentor Cards Today
Mentor cards for the engineering
college will be issued today and can
be obtained from the mentors this

NEOPHYTES CROSS
SCORCHING SANDS
Gliding over the scorching sands
and praying for rain to alleviate the
unbearable temperature, 13 sopho-
mores were dragged into the camp of
the Sphinx, junior lit honorary socie-
ty, yesterday afternoon. The neophy-
tes who survived the journey ,encoun-
tering the thunder shower of ages
near the close, are: David B. Landis,
Edward E. Ruzicka, John R. Reilly,
Willis Blakeslee, Lowell B. Genebach,
William Leitzinger, Dewey F. Fager-
burg, Daniel K. Messner, Russell C.
Barnes, Carl E. Johnson, Reed Bach-
man, Gerald W. Froemke and William
P. Fortune. Charles W. Stoll crossed
the sands in secret a week ago, pre-
paratory to enlisting in the aviation
service.
At the mummification banquet held
at the Union last night, Joseph Brod-
erick, acting as Zip, the Zephyr, call-
ed for desert breezes from the fol-
lowing: Ralph E. Gault,'19, Albert E.
Horne, '18, Gerald Nye, '19, and David
B. Landis of the neophytes.
CHINESE REQUEST
PAPER EXCHANGE
A letter received by President Harry
B. Hutchins from the chinese Univer-
sity at Peking expresses the desire
to exchange college papers with the
University of Michigan.-
The letter says in part "We think it
is a good thing for the Universities
on each side of the Pacific to know
and understand what the others are
doing. Perhaps we can learn som&
thing from each other. This is why
we wish to exchange University pa-
pers."
The letter was accompanid by sev-
eral college papers in chinese and
at the suggestion of President Hutch-
ins these and all succeeding issues re-
ceived will be placed in the reading
room at Alumni Memorial hall for the
benefit of the chinese students in the
University.
The University of Peking has al-
ready been added to the Daily's mail-
ing list.
DRAFT BOARDS MUST BRING
WORK UP TO DATE THIS MONTH
"Our work is entirely completed up
to date, and we will be ready to take
care of the next draft which will
follow the coming registration day,
June 5". Mr. Esslinger, head of the
local draft board, said yesterday.
All the draft boards of Michigan
have been reported behind in their
work. Major A. E. Petermann has
sent out a warning that they must
bring their classifications of regist-
rants up to date and have all men who
filled out questionnaires properly
classified before the end of themonth.
The quotas for the future drafts will
be based upon the number of men in
Class No. 1, and men not otherwise
classified will be considered as be-
ing in the first class.
ILLINOIS VICTORY OVER IOWA
DUE TO LEO KLEIN'S HURLING
Leo Klein's pitching was in a large
measure responsible for the victory of
Illinois over Iowa city at the latter
place Saturday. This Is Iowa's first
defeat, Chicago, whom Michigan could
at her best merely split even, and In-
diana who was easy picking for the

Maise and Blue, both having been
downed by the Iowans by large scores.
Michigan will play Illinois here May
20 and the followers of the Wolverines
will then be able to dope out the odds
they want on the Iowa game. In
spite of the defeat Hamilton the corn
state pitcher is said to have done
wonderful work but had a tendency to
be wild, two erratic heaves being di-
rectly responsible for two of the

WORLD STRUGGLING FOR
WANT Of SHIPS-COOLEY

NO

fichigan Men at Dinner in Paris
Send Greetings to President Hutchins
"Greetings from 34 Michigan men at dinner, Paris May- 4,
Same old Michigan spirit, fight 'em, fight 'em, fight 'em."
This cablegram was received by President Harry B. Hutchins
from Warren Jay Vinton, assistant to Prof. Charles B. Vibbert
who has charge of the Michigan bureau, of the Amercian Univer-
sity Union at Paris.

TIME FOR PETTY POLITICS,
STATES SHIPPING BOARD
CHAIRMAN

SEDITION BILL SWESS
SMEASURE PREVENTS DISLOYAL
UTTERANCES; TO CENSOR
SUSPECTED MAIL
Washington, May 7.-Final legisla-
tive action was taken today on the
sedition bill, giving the government

M' ADOO TO DECIDE
PAYROLL INCREASE
Washington, May 7.-Director gen-
eral McAdoo will announce soon his
decision on recommendations of the
railroad wage commission, which
were said, in well informed quarters
today, to propose an average of 20 per
cent advance in pay for all classes of
railroad employees. If Mr. McAdoo
follows the system of the committee,
approximately $260,000,000 will be
added to the payrolls of the nation's
railroads.
Strong pressure is said to have been
brought to bear on the director gener-
al to modify some of the commission's
recommendations. Mr. McAdoo is not
bound to follow the advice of the
commission, and he can increase, or
reduce their recommendation, as he
sees fit.
liddleton Excels
In Grand Opera
"Arthur Middleton has an excellent
voice of tenor-baritone range and he
knows how to use it to the best ad-
vantage," says the New York Eve-
ning Telegram of the artist, who will
sing in "The Beatitudes," and who
will take the part of "Zuniga" in Cor-
men," at the May Festival, May 15
to 18 in iHil auditorium.
During his first season at the Met-
ropolitan Opera company he appeared
35 times, an unusal number for a new
comer in the field of grand opera. He
is one of the best known concert and
oratorio singers in America. His pop-
ularity in oratorio is indicated by the
fact that he has appeared over 200
times in "The Messiah." He has an
unusal musical memory being able to
sing 50 oratorios without notes.
Middleton has made two transcon-
tinental tours. He is purely an Am-
rican product never having been
abroad.
AUSTRALIA IN NEED OF 30,000
MEN TO FILL ARMY RESERVES

Additional Courses in
Could be Given in
siy

NE[ ALLOTME
OF- 500-OR11
MEN15iS* Ss
PROFESSOR WHITNEY CO
OF WASHINGTON'S
PROVAL

UNION BUILDING MAY
BE MADE AVAILAB

AP-

New York, May 7.-"The hour has
come to support every activity, every
progress, and every aim of the sup-

I

Tele

reme duty of keeping the ocean high- I broader powers to punish disloyal

ways open to our commerce and"our
navy," declared B. Colby, a member
of the United States shipping board,
in an address here today, which was
attended by representatives of the
merchant associations and shipbuild-
ers, of the New York district.
"This is no time for petty politics,
or anything else," said Mr. Colby.
"Considerations of profit, or personal
advantage must be swept aside. The
world needs ships. Liberty through-
out the world is staggering for the
need of ships. America's place in the,
world has fallen, and the only answer
is ships."
TRIANGLES TAKE IN
TEN NEW MEMBERS
Ten engineers strangely costumed
were seen standing in the engineering
arch in the same spot for hours.
They say that these are future Trian-
gles and that they are going through
spring initiation to the junior engi-
neering honorory society.
The new Triangles are: Edward G.
Mraz, D. Knight Mirrielees, Robert
Cook, Joseph L. Baker; Frederick W.-
Parsons, Charles R. Ford, Carl T.
Hogan, Stanley T. Lowe, John I. Dick-
enson, Erich Langenhan.
enhan.
The initiation banquet was held at
the Union. E. G. Dudley, '18E, acted
as toastmaster calling on the fol-
lnwin fn cnahu Prnf J H- Ci

acts and utterances. Adopting a con-
ference report, already approved by
the senate, the house sent to the pre-
sident, for his signature, the measure
which has been before congress for
weeks.
The President is expected to sign
the bill promptly, and through vigor-
ous enforcement of its provisions of-
ficials at the department of justice
say that they will be able to do much
toward checking the wave of mob
outbreak.
Provides 20 Year Prison Term
Penalties of 20 years imprisonment,
or a fine of $10,000, or both, are pro-
vided in -the bill for those convicted
of uttering or printing disloyal abuses,
profane, or contentuous language
about the United States or the govern-
ment, or the form of government, or
the flag. It also provides for those
that are convicted of favoring Ger-
many, or her allies, in the present
war.
The mail censorship section enables
the postmaster general, upon evidence
satisfactory to him, to instruct the
postmaster at any postoffice to elim-
inate mails that are sent in violation
of the provisions of the act.
$2,500,000,000 ASKED
FOR SHIP BUDGET
Washington, May 7.-An enormous
appropriation for merchant ships con-
struction will be asked of the house

lowing or speeenes:ro 1. . . vs-
sel, Charles T. Van Dusan, '19E; Don- appropriation committee tomorrow by
chairman of the shipping board, in
'20E presenting estimates for the fiscal
year beginning July 1, until congress
is informed of the board's plan. Mr.
MICHIGANENSIAN'S FIRST SALES Hurley declined to indicate the ex-
EXCEED THOSE OF LAST YEAR tent or the exact amount involved..
With all ship yards in operation, it
Sale of the Michiganensian yester- is estimated that more than 10,000,000
day exceeded that of the first day last tons of shipping will be produced dur-
year. The first allotment which came ing the year. On this basis, Mr. Hur-
yesterday is exhausted but another ley's budget for the new year probably
shipment arrived last night and more will run close to $2,500,000,000.
of the annuals will be on sale today
for as long as the supply lasts. 1206 Aviators Promoted in French Army

Melbourne, May 7.-Australia needs
30,000 men to fill up its depots of
army reserves in training in England
and Egypt and, in addition, should
enlist 5,400 each month in order to
meet the average losses, asserts Sir
Samuel Griffith, chief justice of the
Australian high, court. Sir Samuel
was appointed some time ago a com-
missioner to investigate the Australian
recruiting situation, and the foregoing
are the main facts in his report.
It would be necessary, he added,
for Australia to enlist more than 7,000
additional men each month this year
in order to make up her deficiency of
reserves in England and Egypt and to
sustain them at the desired number.
"The most we can hope for," he re-
ported, " is to continue using one of
the division as a depot division and.
endeavor to raise in Australia at least
5,400 recruits per month."
After the receipt of Sir Samuel's
report, Premier William M. Hughes
appointed Representative R. B. Orch-
ard, as Minister in charge of recruit-
ing, a office, Mr. Orchard, a Sydney
business man, will devote all his
time to increasing the Australian over-
seas ranks.
Pave Streets With Ore Worth $39 Ton
Butte, Mont., May 7.-City officials
and residents of Butte have discovered
that they have been paving their
streets with manganese ore worth
about $32 a ton. Now this question
arises:
"Shall the city rip up its streets and
sell the ore, use the proceeds to con-
struct new streets, and keep the
profit?"
A few years ago this mangenese
rock was considered worthless. But
the war has changed everything. The
demand for manganese for making
implements of warfare constantly has
been growing heavier.

That the University will reciev
new allotment of 500 drafted men t
trained as auto mechanics is '
practically an assured fact. Capi
Whitney, who arrived in Ann Ar
yesterday to make a military ins
tion of the University, has compl
his survey and has approved the i
ommendations previously made
Prof. Philip B. Woodworth.
Captain Whitney's indorsement
Professor Woodworth's report ins
the endoftpreliminary proceed
and the matter now rests in the ha:
of the authorities at Washington, I
fessor Woodworth stated last ni
that he was confident that ac1
would be taken in accordance with
suggestions.
Uno as Quarters
In commenting upon the avail
ity of the new Union as quarters
the mechanics, Homer Heath, '0?,
eral secretary of the Union, made
following statement:
"In order to make the new bui
available for use by 'August 15,
Union would have to award contri
approximating $100,000 in additio
those which are now let. Only $10
of this would be wasted thro
adapting the building to use by
government. This waste would be
to the purchase of temporay ft
tshings and equipment which we
be removed at the end of the govi
ment's term of occupation.
Contracts Awarded
"The building committee has awi
ed contracts as far as it can safel
so when the amount of money on F
and tn prospect is considered.
shortage of labor and material
cause delay in the copletion of
new building, but money is the
important factor just now.
Additional Courses
Among the courses which Uni
sity officials think could be given
in addition to the mechanical inst
tion are telegraphy and wireless 1
graphy. In order to raise its q
the national army needs 1,600 1
graphers and 4,000 wireless opera
at the end of six months. If these
given their instruction In three
each pursuing a course of study
two months, 530 telegraphers ay
300 wireless operators would rec
preparation at the same tIme.
Contracts Let
However, the government hai
force only one contract for the t
ing of 100 telegraphers and , e
tract pending for the instructio
100 wireless operators every
months. Thus it can be seen tha
shortage every two months of
graphers is*430 and that of wire
operators 1,200.
It is with a view toward filling
deficit that 'a number of promi
faculty men are endeavoring to t
the University offer more extem
courses in these two branche
study.
* * * * * * . * * **
* opit etingTo
* An important meeting of' t
* Soph Lit class will be held at
* o'clock this afternoon in roc
* 205, Mason hall, to discuss arran
* ment for the Soph prom and oth
* social events.
Y " * * . * * 4 " I .

The final day of sale will be Thurs-
day and at that 'time all persons de-
siring the year book may obtain one
whether they have a coupon or not.
Prices are $2.50 with the coupon
and $3.50 without the coupon.
Senior Society Elects New Members
Senior society, the seniors honorary
society for independent girls has elec-
ted the following women to member-
ship.
Winona Beckley, Lois Bennallack,
Ruth Dailey, Grace Emery, Gertrude
Gunn, Hope Keeler, Katherine Kil-
patrick, Emily Powell, Mildred Rein-
del, Alice Hawes. Initiation will be
held May 20.

Paris, May 7.-Two hundred and six
aviators licensed by the aero club of
France have been promoted to the
rank of officers in the French army
during the war, according to figures
given out at a reception given by the
club. The club has issued upwards
of 11,000 licenses to pilots, 76 of whom
have won the cross of the Legion of
Honor, 20 have gained the coveted
military medal and 206 have been de-
corated with the War Cross.
During the past year French avia-
tors have dropped 675 tons of explo-
sives on the enemy's positions, de-
stroyed twenty-seven observation bal-
loons, shot down 606 airplanes and
damaged 583 more.

their offices.

scores.

ICE $3.50
you did

The 1918

Michig anensian

Is on Sale Today in University Hall

a

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