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May 03, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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(Continued from Page Four)
work to enable him to think clearly
and manipulate accurately. A read-
ing knowledge of scientific French or
German is required and enough work
in physics and mathematics to enable
him to utilize these subjects in his
work in either pure or applied chemis-
try. In order to prevent excessive
specialization in an undergraduate
course, at least 12 hours of work is
required to be taken in Group 11I, and
room is left for a student to elect
more cultural studies if he so desires.
Can Enter Laboratory
Experience has demonstrated that
a person who has as thorough a grasp
of the fundamental principles as is
represented by the degree of B. S. in
chemistry can enter the laboratory of
almost any chemical industry or a
government laboratory such as those
connected with the bureau of mines,
the agricultural department, or the
geological survey and after one or
two weeks' practice in the technical
work of that laboratory under the
guidance of the head chemist will be
able sucucessfully to carry on any
ordinary routine work entrusted to
him. The training in chemistry is suf-
ficient to enable a graduate to teach'
this subject in a first class high school
provided he has the other necessary
qualifications.
Training in Research
If, after completing the work requir-
ed for the degree of B. S. in chemistry,
a student can take at least a year of
graduate work leading to a master's
degree, or, better, enough to obtain
the degree of doctor of philosophy, he
will secure a training in research
which will usually insure more re-
sponsible positions and better oppor-
tunities for advancement after leav-'
ing the University than-if he remained
only until the completion of his un-
dergraduate course.
The present war has called for the
services of so many chemists that it
has been impossible to supply one-
half this demand. An almost new field
has thus been created for women, since
many industrial firms have announc-
ed their intention of employing wo-
men in their chemical laboratories un-
der the same conditions as those which
formerly held for men doing the sameI
work.

(Continued from Page One)
in a body to see the game with Chi-
cago.
Standing of Teams
The progress of sales among the men
shows the teams of John D. Hibbard,
'18E, and F. H. Tinsman, '18D, tied for
first honors, each having $7,850 to its
credit. Captain S. S. Atwood, '18E, has
second place with a subscription of
$6,400. The teams of Albert E. Horne,
'18, and H. A. Knowlson, '18E, are
third and fourth with subscriptions of
$5,550 and $4,800, respectively.
Literary College in Lead
The subscription by colleges and de-
partments among the men shows the
literary college in the lead with $14,-
750. The other colleges, and sums
subscribed by each, are as follows:
College of Engineering and Archi-
tecture, $9,700; .Medical school, $2,-
100; Law school, $1,400; Dental col-
lege, $250; Pharmacy college, $200;
and miscellaneous, $4,050. The total
men's subscriptions are $32,450.
Women's Subscriptions
The team of Wyvern, women's junior
honorary society, is in the lead over
Mortarboard, senior society's team,
-with subscriptions of $10,050, as com-
pared with Mortarboard's $6,650. The
total women's subscriptions are $16,-
700.
Women's subscriptions by classes
show the juniors to be in the lead,
the complete figures for each class be-'
ing as follows:
Seniors, $1,900; juniors, $7,200;
sophomores, $2,650; freshmen, $$1,400;
graduate students, 52,250; and mis-
cellaneous, $1,300.
U. S. SHOULD DECLARE WAR ON
TURKS AND BULGARIA-LANSING
Washington, May 2.-The reasons
why the state department does not
consider war declarations between
Turkey and .Bulgaria are necessary
at this time were given before the
senate resolutions committee, in exe-
cutive session today, by secretary
Lansing.
U. of M. Jewelry. J. i. Cihapman'a
Is tne place. 118 . Main.-AAf.
Rugs cleaned and washed. Hatisfac-
tion guaranteed. Koch and Henne.---
2402.---Adv.

4:15 o'clock - Michigan-Chicago
baseball game on Ferry field.
7:15 o'clock-Alpha Nu literary so-
ciety meets in Alpha Nu rooms, Uni-
versity hall.
8:00 o'clock -Northern Oratorical
League contest in Hill auditorium.
8:30 o'clock-Fresh Engineer dance
in Barbour gymnasium.
TOMORROW
3:00 o'clock - Michigan-Chicago
baseball game on Ferry field.
7:00 o'clock-Upper Room Bible
class, 444 South State.
7:30 o'clock-Craftsman club meets
in the Masonic Temple.
7:30 o'clock-Special meeting of
Polonia Liberty Circle in Lane hall.
8:00 o'clock-"Foreign Students'
Night" in Lane hall.
Dr. Freeman heads Adrian College
Adrain, Mich., May 2.-One of
the shortest and most harmonious
sessions held by the board of trus-
tees since the establishment of Adrian
college ended tonight with the un-
animous re-election of Dr. Harlan L.
Freeman, as president. The* finances
of the college were shown to be in a
good condition and prospects for next
year were said - to be encouraging
The board outlined some important
new lines of policy and heard the an-
nual reports class day exercises will
be held Wednasday and the commence-
ment address will be delivered Thurs-
day by John D. Shoop, superintend-
ent of the public schools of Chicago.
Special Summer Courses in Psychology

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C. ARS
,Y fOVERI1IITENT

Michigan students in the summer r
school will have an opportunity to learn
something of the science of psychol- f
ogy as related to military selection.
Dr. Henry F. Adams, instructor in r
the psychology department, will offer e
an option of a course in advertising P1
or one in business psychology.
"If the course in business psychol-
ogy is selected," said Dr. Adams,
"considerable time will be given to le
mental testing as related to educa- d
tional selection, industrial selection l
and military selection."
Patronize a Daily Advertiser once t
and you will patronize him again. A

eported
d outrig
losion.
Sunday

ington, May. 2.-Orders for
additional freight cars, to sup-
t the 30,000 contracted for sev-
ys ago, were placed today by
lroad administration with 15
ilding concerns. The average
between $170,000,000 and $210,-

_ + ww

Ann

Awbor

May

Four Days -- May 15, 16, 17, 18

-- Six Co

UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ANN ARBOR CHILDREN'S CHORUS
ALBERT A. STANLEY, Conductor

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCH
Founded by Theodore Thomas
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor

OPERA STARS-ORATORIO SINGERS

ADULT AND CHILIL

PIANISTS-ORC

i

TICKETS STILL

FOR ALL SIX CONCERTS-$4.00, $5.00, $6.00.
day noon, May 4.)
FOR SINGLE CONCERTS-$1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
day morning, May 6.)
- at -
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MU

A FEAST OF MUSIC FOR SIX

"CARMEN" will be sung by the Metropolitan Opera's greatest stars.
"THE BEATITUDES" will be given Thursday evening by eleven American singers.
THE CHILDREN will sing "Into the World" Friday afternoon.

THE ORCHESTRA and CHORUSES will offer brilliant numbers.
THE ARTISTS will sing beautiful songs and operatic airs.
PATRIOTIC MUSIC in keeping with the times will be on the program at each concert,

n s

Great

19

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