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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-17

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TA4E WEATHER
IFAIR AND COLDER

BUY THAT LIBERTY BOND NOW!
C1r tIJnk aitt

I

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT 'WIRE
SERVICE

TODAY

p

VOL XXVIII. No. 14. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,
TEN CONGRESSMEN
Ml'HI~iAN'R IF TO VISIT ALLIESI FI ,l 1fNINI

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1917. PRICE THREE CENTS

>

I Lul il III IU
TO LIBERTYLOAN
REACHEs' S 1,350
COMMITTEE ASTONISHED AT STU-
DENTS' TARDINESS IN SUB-
SCRIBING MONEY

-j

THREE FRATERNITIES
CARRY HALF OF SUM
Campaign Tent Near Law Building to
Be Run by Volunteer Or-
ganizations
Michigan students have subscribed
$11,350 to .the second Liberty loan is-
sue. Tuesday's total was $7,050.
At the rate of $7,000 a day, Michi-
gan will not reach half of the $200,-
000 quota assigned in the nine remain-
ing days of the campaign. Three fra-
ternities have carried approximately
half of the total subscription to date,
Zeta Beta Tau having $2,350; Alpha
Delta Phi, $2,300, and Phi Kappa Psi,
$1,450.
"We can't believe that these returns
are representative of what will actual-
ly be subscribed, but rather that many
organizations are slow in lending their
aid by sending in early subscriptions,"
was the statement issued by the Uni-
versity loan committee Tuesday.
Office hours for the committee who
will receive the reports and subscrip-
tions of the University loan worlMrs
have been changed from 4 o'clock to
3:30 o'clock daily. The office in room
268 New Engineering building will
remain the same.
The present rate of subscription
means an average contribution of
about $15 per student. This is a 301
cent per student per week payment by
which the University must measure its
student patriotism.;
All women living in houses of six;
or less are invited to a loan session at
Newberry residence Thursday after-
noon at 4 o'clock. Albert Horne, '18,,
antl S. S. Atwood, '18E, Anna Lloyd,1
'18, president of the Women's league,I
and Mildred Mighell, '18, women's
editor of The Daily, will'speak. Wom-
en who are not in touch with the Lib-
erty loan drive in the University arej
asked to attend.
The campaign tent pitched on thet
campus near North University ave-1
nue and State street will be managede
by the Trigons this week. Next week1
some other volunteer organization will
take charge. The man in the tent
will solicit bonds among the students,
who have not yet been approached.
Liberty lights burned in the win-r
dows of every Ann Arbor school Mon-
day night in celebration of the ruralr
school day which was set aside bya
Gov. A. E.-Sleeper. Patriotic programsa
were given in all the schools.r
The local Liberty loan committee
reported the purchase of $363,200
worth of bonds Tuesday. Arrange-t
ments are being made for a monsterp
parade to be held Saturday, a halft
hour before the M. A. C. game. Thet
committee is planning to have all the1
captains and workers on loan teams
join in and march to the game in at
body.-
GOVERNMENT EXPENDITURES
NEAR $3,000,000,000 MARKv
Washington, Oct. 16.-Government
expenditures since the beginning ofe
the fiscal year July 1st, are nearingt
the $3,000,000,000 mark. The total re-I
ported on the treasury statement yes-a
terday was $2,921,075,341. This is1
nearly $800,000,000 more than the re-b
ceipts during this period includingn
that portion of the first Liberty loann
paid since the fiscal year began. p

Unofficial Ambassadors to Confer
with Representatives at Fore
eign Capitals
Washington, Oct. 16.-Ten members
of congress, travelling in unofficial
capacity but carrying special pass-
ports arranged by the state depart-
ment, are on the way to Europe to
yisit the war friends and fraternize
with, the parliamentary representa-
tives of the Allies.
The visit is a development of the re-
cent cabled and personal invitations
of representative members of the Brit-
ish and French parliment for closer
affiliation of the parlimentary bodies
of the allied governments through per-
sonal conferences at the British,
French and Italian capitals.;
President Wilson did not favor con-
gress officially accepting the invita-
tion at this time and neither house
took action but the ten members ar-
ranged their trip informally. Other
representatives are expected to fol-
low soon.
TAXES LEVIED ON"
THETA.TICKETS
Price May Be Raised Ten Per Cent on
Admission to Local Play-
houses
STATE EXHIBITORS WILL MEET
IN DETROIT TO DISCUSS PLANS
Theater Box Office Records Must Be
Kept Open for Federal In-
spection
Admission taxes amounting to one
cent on each 10 cents or fraction
thereof will be levied on all theater-
goers beginning Nov. 1.
Just how this levy will be made is
as yet uncertain in Ann Arbor' Its
administration has been left entirely
to the theater managers. They may
either incorporate the tax in the price
of their tickets or they may increase
the price by the few cents necessary
to comply with federal law.
"We will collect a separate tax from
each ticket at the box office," said Mr.
G. S. Greening, manager of the Ma-
jestic theater yesterday. "This plan
has been worked out in Canada for
the last three years, and we will fol-
low it here. Tickets which were form-
erly 30 cents will cost 33 cents after
Nov. 1. There will be some confusion
at first, but we must become ac-_
customed to it."
Mr. S. A. Moran, manager of the
Arcade theater, and president of the
Michigan branch of the American Ex-4
hibitors' association, stated that no!
definite action had been taken in the
matter. "I will call for a meeting of
all state exhibitors in Detroit prob-
ably next week, in order that we may
have some understanding between us7
and may act in unison," asserted Mr.
Moran.
"I cannot say now'just how we shall
handle the situation," declared Mr. J.
F. Wuerth, owner of the Wuerth and
Orpheum theaters. "Any action which
the state board may take will be fol-
owed out."
"Mr. Whitney of Detroit will have '
to decide what plan is to be carriedt
out here," replied the manager of thet
Whitney theater on being questioned.
The new law contains several pro-t
visions, the most important of which
follow:
"A tax of one cent for each 10 cents
or fraction thereof must be paid by

the person paying for such admission.t
In the case of a child under 12 theE
admission tax is but one cent regard-
less of the amount of admission paid1
by or for such child. Where the maxi-
mum admission charge is five cents,
no tax is levied." Persons using a
passes will be required to pay the tax

11.V I dlU ~U1 IlULM
ATTACK ON DESEL
Huns Strive to Sieze Whole Island;
Fleet Meets Resistance In
Gulf of Riga
BERLIN REPORTS ISLAND OF
ABRO OCCUPIED BY TROOPS
French Regain Lost Territory Along
Aisne Sector by Counter
Attacks
BULLETIN
London, Oct. 16.-According to
news from Berlin in an undated
dispatch received by the admiralty
by wireless, Germany is expected
shortly to declare the cost of the
United States, Canada, and Cuba
war zones.
Apparently there has been no ces-
sation in the rapid program of the
Germans to sieze in its entirety the
Russian island of Oesel at the head of
the Gulf of Finland, but although their
troops now have taken the greater
portion of the island, the help they had
expected from their fleet in putting
down Russian opposition in adjacent
waters is meeting with considerable
resistance from the Russian warships.
In a small battle with torpedo craft
and possibly light cruisers, the Rus-
sians have sunk two German tropedo
boats and damaged two others to the
north of Oesel Island where the 4us-
sians themselves lost a torpedo boat
destroyer. The German vessels whichE
were accompanied by battleships put
to sea after the engagement.
The German land forces now are
driving hard against the southwesternt
portion of the island of Oesel with the1
object of capturing the batteries at
Serel which dominates the eastern en-
trance to the Gulf of Riga.t
Berlin reports that Abro Island, offt
the southern coast of Oesel and RunoI
Island in the middle of the Gulf oft
Riga, have been occupied by GermanI
troops. It is asserted that 2,400 pris-r
oners, 30 guns, 21 machine guns, ands
several airplanes were captured by
the Germans in Oesel.N
The troops of the entente allies aref
still keeping to their trenches in9
Flanders, probably awaiting a bet-N
terment of soil conditions which thev
recent rains and flooded streams ren-.f
dered almost impracticable to attack.
To the south along the Aisne, the Ger-t
mans after a lively bombardment have
again attacked French positions and
succeeded in penetrating their en-d
trenchments. As has been customary,D
however, the French immediatelya
counter attacked and regained the losti
ground.c
MEDICAL STUDENTS
WILL BE EXEMPTED
Those Called By Draft Boards MayI
Secure Counter-Order; Dents '
IncludedE
Medical students above their fresh-V
man year and hospital internes whoI
have been drafted into the nationalt
army by local boards may now beB
discharged from camp and return tod
the universities to complete their
courses. This was a ruling made by
he president in his supplemental reg-
ulations governing the execution of
he selective service law.
Each student so discharged must,d
iowever, join the enlisted reserven

corps, which consists chiefly of mena
who have been sent back from can-a
onments to finish their medical cours- c
es. That the men are subject to call
at any time is the only condition in-b
posed upon them.d
Medical students who have beenn
called by their local boards and de-t
lire to finish their courses shouldd
apply to the surgeon-general of the
army. Wit every request must beT
enclosed th order of the local board
calling for physical examination, af-
idavit evidence of the status of the
applicant as a medical student, andz
petition to enroll in the enlisted t
reservecorps. Upon order they maya
>e discharged by their local boards.t

BOOST YELLS NEEDED
FOR LIBERTY ORIVI
COMPETITION OPENED BY ATH
LETIC ASSOCIATION TO
AID LOAN
"Yes, go ahead, I'm for it," was th
way in which Mr. P. G. Bartelme spok
when asked his opinion of a booste
scheme which local Liberty loan cam
paigners have devised.
A request for yells boosting the Lib
erty loan has been sent out by th
athletic association of the University
The best one will bring a free ticke
for the M. A. C. game to its composer
Competent judges will be selected to
choose which of the yells will receive
the prize.
On account of the great amount of
material it is expected that competi_
tion will be strong. For this reason
contributions should be turned in to
the editor of The Daily as soon as
possible.
6. re.-HURLEY LEADS
NEW UNION OFFICERS
PROF. J. C. PARKER CHOSEN TO
TAKE PLACE OF DEAN BATES
ON BOARD OF DIRECTORS
George F. Hurley, '16-'18L, was
elected president of the Michigan
Union at a meeting of the board of
directors held yesterday.
The title of president in absentia
was conferred upon Charles W. Fisch-
er, Jr., '18, who was elected president
last spring, but who is now in the
service. Prof. John C. Parker was
appointed to the board of directors to
fill the position left vacant by Dean
Henry M. Bates, who is on leave of
absence at Harvard.
The election of a law vice-president
to succeed Hurley will take place at
the next meeting of the board of di-
rectors, after the nominating commit-
tee has made its report. Richey B.
Reavil1, '19, has been appointed chair-
man of a follow-up Union member-
ship campaign.
The board of directors decided, as a
war measure, not to hold the annual
football smoker or banquet this year.
To take the place of this affair, there
will be some sort of mass meeting
when the "M's" are awarded to the
football team.
The complete personnel of the Mich-
igan Union executive staff is as fol-
lows:
George ,F. Hurley, '16-18L, presi
dent; Waldo McKee, '18E, Carl W.
Neumann, '18, Justin L. Powers, '18P,
and Thomas L. Tolan, '18M, vice-pres-
idents; Cecil C. Andrews, '18-'20L, re-
cording secretary; Evans Holbrook,
'OOL, financial secretary; Homer L.
Heath, '07, general secretary and man-
ager; Frank M. Bacon, '02, director
of student activities; Prof. William A.
Frayer, Prof. John C. Parker, and
Dr. Reuben Peterson, faculty repre-
sentatives to the board of directors;
Henry W. Douglas, '90E, Lawrence
Maxwell, '74, Stanley D. McGraw, '92,
Walter E. Oxtoby, '98L, and G. Fred
Rush, '89, alumni representatives to
the board of directors; and Wilfred
B. Shaw, '04, member of the board of
directors.
BLAZE DESTROYS ONE MILLION
TONS OF HAY AT CAMP CUSTER
Battle Creek, Oct. 16.-A fire of un-

determined origin at Camp Custer to-
night destroyed a million tons of hay
and gave about 1,000 of the national
army men their first experience in
fighting flames.
Major Robinson, who discovered the
blaze, said it started to puff up sud-
denly from the middle of the three
million pound pile at the remount sta-
tion. An investigation is being con-
ducted.
IOWA CITIZENS OBJECT TO
STATE-WIDE PROHIBITION
Des Moines, Ia., Oct. 16.-Iowa citi-
zens apparently have declined to bind
themselves to state-wide prohibition,
according to late returs tonight re-
ceived from all but three counties in,
the state.:
The count of votes gives $197,279
against, and 196,341 for, the proposed
constitutional prohibition amendment.
Statutory prohibition now prevails in
Iowa.

I

1

e DRIVING THE LIBERTY LOAN
r TO SUCCESS IN MICHIGAN
Total subscriptions-Monday,
$4,300.-
e *
Tuesday, $7,350.
t Student total to date, $11,350.
Michigan's quota, $200,000.
Nine working days lef, at pres-
ent rate of subscriptions will
raise but $63,450.
Faculty subscriptions to date,
$59,000.
The three leading fraternities
~-Zeta Beta Tau, $2,350; Alpha
Delta Phi, $2,300; Phi Kappa
Psi, $1,450. These organizations
carry about half of the total
student subscriptions.
Board in control of student
publications, $2,000.
Adelphi house of representa-
tives, $100.
To beat Princeton's quota of
$400,000, Michigan has $327,450
to go.
In other words, Michigan
Needs to Speed Up. ,
BOND SALE REACHES.
S1,OOO,ODO MARK
TREASURY OFFICIALS DOUBTFUL
OVER SUCCESS OF SECOND
LIBERTY LOAN
Washington, Oct. 16. - With 14
working days gone and only 10 more
to come, Liberty bond sales. were be-
lieved by treasury-officials tonight to
have just touched the $1,000,000,000
mark, a result which has led them to
wonder if the $5,000,000,000 hoped for
could be attained in the final days of
the campaign.
Officials figures representing actual
sales reported tonight to the treas-
ury department as of the close of bus-
iness yesterday placed the total at
$528,230,850, or a little more than half
the $1,000,0001000 believed to - have
been subscribed. These figures do not
include the result of the two day can-
vass made by 600,000 workers in the
Minneapolis district and places the
amount in other districts far below th:
sums reported unofficially. The official
totals include $56,145,000 from the
Chicago federal reserve district.
"Granting the most reasonable al-
lowance for unreported sales,' the
treasury department statement contin-
ues, "The situation is not encourag-
ing."
Army sales continue to increase un-
til tonight the boys in khaiki had
bought more than $25,000,000 in bonds.

SUGGEST STUDENT COUNCIL FIND
SUBSTITUTE FOR ANNUAL
BATTLES
BOTH CLASSES FAVOR
MOVE OF OFFICIALS
Wil Be First Time in History of
Campus That Encounters Have
Not Been Held
"Resolved that in view of the dang-
ers involved and in view also of condi-
tions incident to the war the Senate
council does not approve the flag
rush and push-ball contest; the Sen-
ate council therefore recommends
that the Student council find if pos-
sible, some substitutes for these ev-
ents that will meet the objections felt"
This resolution which was adopted
at a meeting of the Senate council
Monday afternoon but scarcely noth-
ing was known of the action until it
was read before the freshman mass
meeting by S. S. Atwood, '18E, presid-
ent of the Student council, ast evening
when the yearlings had assembled to
elect leaders and organize for the
contest that was abolished.
Another resolution was adopted by
the c uncil immediately after this one
and reads as follows: "Resolved,
That when a suitable substitute for
the flag rush is found permission will
be granted to hold the event on a
Saturday morning."
This will be the first time in the
history of the campus since the
rushes were started that the sopho-
mores and freshmen have been refus-
ed their semi-yearly opportunity to
battle each other.
Attwood assured the yearlings that
the council would take immediate
steps to find some possible substitu-
tion for the contests.
Dean John R. Effinger of the liter-
ary college, complimented the first
year men upon the spirited way which
they received the news. "This is the
best example of college spirit I have
seen in many years of college," he
said.
One of the prominent seniors on the
campus when interviewed on the pro-
position of the games said, "Person-
ally I do not see the value of the
games. The good accomplished is not
worth the chance taken."
Interviews among sophomores show
that the majority of this class felt that
the action of the Senate council was
favorable with this class as well as
with the freshmen.
What action will be taken by the
Student council in trying to find a
substitute for the games is only a mat-
ter of speculation according to one
council member.
COAL STRIKE HITS
MINING INDUSTRY
Four Miines Closed When 15,000 ]en
Quit in Illinois Walk-
Ot
Springfield, Ill., Oct. 16.-More than
four coal mines in central and south-
ern Illinois, representing between 12,-
000 and 15,000 miners were shut down
today. The coal mining industry of
the state tonight faces virtual pa-
ralysis as a result of the spreading
strike of miners who demand immedi-
ate wage increases, operators here
stated.
Miners said today they were given
to understand that the new wage
agreement reached at Washington

would be effective without delay. Op-
erators on the other hand pointed to
a clause making increases contingent
upon an advance by the fuel admin-
istration in Illinois coal prices, de-
claring present prices are prohibitive
of wage increase.
Military Training Classes Cancelled
Military drill will be cancelled this
afternoon to permit men to attend the
Michigan-Detroit football game, ac-
cording to orders issued by Lieut. G.
C. Mullen, Tuesday.
Drills will be resumed Thursday as
usual.

SENATE COUNCIL RECOMMENDS THAT
FLAG RUSH AND PUSH-BALL CONTEST
BE DISCONTINUED IN THE UNIVERSITY

D.

M. DICKSON, '67L, FORMER
POSTMASTER-GENERAL, DIES

Mr. Donald M. Dickinson, '67L, post-
master-general during the administra-
tion of President Cleveland and a
prominent figure in Democratic cir-
cles, died Monday at his home in Tren-
ton. He had been in poor health for
three years.
Mr. Dickinson entered politics in
1872, became chairman of the Demo-
cratic committee in this state in 1876,
and was appointed to the national
committee four years later. This posi-
tion he retained' for five years. In
1887 he became postmaster-general in
President Cleveland's cabinet. He re-
fused a .similar position in Cleveland's
next administration.
Mr. Dickinson is survived by his
widow, one son, Don M. Dickinson,
Jr., and one daughter, Mrs. Frances
D. Barbour.
SOPH LITS TO ELECT CLASS
OFFICERS THURSDAY NIGHT
The sophomore lit class will hold
its first meeting of the year in the
auditorium of University hall at 7
o'clock tomorrow evening. The class
officers for the coming year will be
nominated.
The University Zionist society will
meet at 7 o'clock tomorrow in room
P-162 Natural Science building.

The greatest single item of expendi- also, and those holding season tickets
ture was $1,571,200,000 advanced the: must pay a tax on their seat at any

allies. performance
Each thea
Y. W. and Y. M. Cabinets Meet pelled to .su
Cabinet members of the Y. M. C. A. month, a sv
and the Y. W. C. A. will gather at a receipts for
supper to be given in Lane hall to- accompanied
night. The trustees of the Students' collected.]
Christian association have been in- must be ke]
vited to joint with them. to federal in
The war service conference, which ness in ma
is to be held at Battle Creek Friday,' ment render
will be the main topic of the evening. fine of $500.

for which it is held.
ter manager will be com-
bmit, on the first of every
worn statement as to his
the month. This must be
[by a draft for the amount
Daily box office records
pt, which will be subject
spection at any time. Lax-
king the monthly settle-
s any person liable to a

Local taxi companies have peti-
tioned the city council for-permission
to raise their rates. The matter has
been referred to the ordinance com-
mittee of the council.

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