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May 01, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

l

Gansle
in Street

1927

and

may feel proud of

PHONE 994

r that Germany may be rumored
constructing. But I believe that
boats will turn out to be no
effective in their purpose than
5-mile guns have proved."
report stated that the great
were expected to be superior
stroyers, but Prof. Horace W.
thinks that more emphasis
di be placed upon American
vise shipping. "I doubt if a
arine can be constructed to over-
r a destroyer," he said, "for the
ce boat can stand considerable
nd still remain afloat, while one
placed shot puts the submarine
f commission.
greater speed of the destroyer
o to its advantage, both in pur-
the U-boat and in escaping from
>uld the other gain the advan-
While admitting the possibility
e construction of such a boatj
a technical standpoint Prof.
rd M. Bragg of the marine en-
ring department, was inclined
ubt the report as arising from
an sources.
'A DELTA DELTA FALLS
BEFORE PI BETA PHI TEAM'
to unforseen circumstances,
-ony of fate, and everything,
Delta Delta met their Waterloo
'day afternoon when Pi Beta Phi
iped with the large end of the
all score 18-10.

between Kappa Alpha Theta and Col-
legiate Sorosis, From all indications,
a stellar match is promised, while
preparations have been made to take
care of a large and enthusiastic au-
dience.
Beards Helpful
In Gas Attacks
Full beards are all the style in the
trenches, according to the Associated
Press. That is what the Germans in
the first line of battle are told, any-
way.
The reason is to be sought in the
gas mask. Some of the authorities
hold that the gas mask will not pro-
tect any but clean-shaven faces, while
others claim that a dense hirsute
growth within the mask acts as an
additional filter for the poison gas.
But it must be a real beard, the'reg-
ular patriarchal .kind, and not mere-
ly the bristles of seven or fourteen
days, says the Deutsche Tageszeitung,
an Amsterdam paper. The paper goes
on to say that a full beard is the
particular attribute of the German,
and should be cultivated as such. Be-
sides, adds the German writer naively,
it adds to the "frightful aspect."
Notwithstanding the aspect, full
bearded men have stated that they
have been able to go through gas at-
tacks much more easily than their
cleaner shaven brothers. So if we
want to beat Germans at their own
game, it is up to all of us that are
bound for the trenches to develop a
regular, full-sized beard.
ORDNANCE COURSE
OPENS.AT CARNEGIE
Lieutenant J. W. Robinson, '15E, is
in town today to secure men for a
new ordnance training class to com-
mence immediately at Carnegie Tech-
nical Iistitute in Pittsburg and extend
for a period of eight weeks. Lieuten-
ant Robinson will be in. Dean Butts'
office in the Engineering building
from 9 until 12 o'clock today to confer
with applicants.
Three years of a bachelor of science
course in engineering are necessary
to admittance, and a temporary ap-
pointment under the civil service with
a salary of $1,000 a year will be given
to students completing the course.
The work will fit the men to be
inspectors of munitions, and they will
come under the supervision of Major
A. E. White, of the ordnance depart-
ment, formerly professor of chemical
engineering in the University. Fifty
pnen are wanted for this work by
Major White, who has sent Lieuten-]
ant Robinson here to explain the work
to Michigan students
"There is a desperate need for this
type of men in the service," said Dean
Mortimer E. C. Cooley, of the engi-
neering college, last night in dis-
cussing the course, "and men finish-
in the course will very likely receive
promotion into the army."
SCrIUXANN-HEINK SINGING
BRINGS $6,000 FOR BONDS

SPECIALIATION TILKS
BY CAMPUS'PROFESSORS
PRESENT OUTLOOK FOR A CAREER
IN FIELD OF GEOLOGY
EXCELLENT
(By Prof. Ermine C. Case)
The work of the department of geo-
logy and geography in the Univer-
sity of Michigan is directed toward
the advancement of knowledge of the
earth and the response of its inhabit-
ants to the various infiluences of cli-
mate, soil, altitude, hydrography, to-
pography, etc., which are brought
to bear upon them.
Geology is essentially a study of the
Interaction of the various forces of
nature upon matter under natural
conditions. It is an application of ther
laws and principles of physics and
chemistry to the matter of the earth.
There are many phases of the subject
that it is impossible to even name
more than a few of them here. Phy-
siography has to do with the shape
'and shaping'of the earth's surface by
the rivers, waves, winds, ice, etc:;
structural and dynamic geology with
the position of the various rock mass-
es and the changes going on within
them, also with cause of the great
disturbances of the earth's crust by
volcanoes, earthquakes and mountain-
making movements; ecnomic geology
with the recognition and location of
valuable material of all sorts; histor-
ical geology with past events of the
earth and the position of the land and
water masses at different intervals of
time; paleontologic geology with the
development of life upon the earth.
The department is attempting to train
men for teaching the various branch-
es, for service in the different state
geological surveys and the federal
geological survey, for commercial
work as oil, coal, ore, or soil geolo-
gists, and to give an intelligent idea
of the subject to. those who are inter-
ested in the subject as part of a well
rounded education.
OutlooI for Career Billiant
The outlook for a career in geology
was never more brilliant than now
At present, under the stress of war
conditions, men possessed of any
knowledge of grqund water condi-
tions, the sources of usuable material
for construction ' or metallurgical
work, soil conditions, and fertility,
fuel, either gas, -oil, or coal, or a
hundred other branches of the sub-
ject can be of thegreatest use to the
government. Under more normal con-
ditions the rapid exploitation of all
the natural resources of the country
has developed a demand for experts in
every branch of the science which
absorbs the output of trained men a-t
once. It has been very difficult to
retain men in the various universities
until their period of training was com-
plete.
Stratigraphic geology, which is us-
ually taught as a part of historical
,geology, has to do with the position
of the various layers of the earth's
surface and their interpretation. Its
function is to determine the age of
the different beds and correlate their
separated parts as they appear in out-
crops. The determination of the age
and the correlation is accomplished
by the aid of the contained fossils so
the study of paleontologic geology be-
comes a very practical matter. Cer-
tain geological products of value are
confined to beds of a certain age, they
may appear only once or they may oc-
cur in successive periods but confined
to particular beds within those period

and they must be accurately located in
depth as well as geographic position.
Aside from this purely commercial
phase the students of fossils have
contributed some of the most brilliant
chapters in the development of the
theory of evolution.
Geography is Now Practical
Geography today is far removed
removed from the old place geography
where the ability to name all the
chief towns, capes, and rivers, of any
country or to bound a state was the
sufficient sum total. Geography now
approaches the matter from the cas-
ual side; the development of peoples,
the great migratory movements, the
courses of wars and political crises
are related to the soil, the
climate, the water, and land routes of
transportation, and the valuable de-
posits of the earth. The historian,
economist and the politician are all
very closely concerned -with the con-
tent of a modern course, in geography
and students of these departments in
the University.- are finding a large
measure of value in such basic stud-
ies.
There is no one of. the productive
industries which is not directly ben-
efited by geology and geography, and
there are none of the humanities which
would fail to find helpful material in
the subject. On the other hand, the
two sciences are the application of

ink the pro
resuldts tou
life.
. * . *
*
* AT1
*
* "Lord
* Garrick.

*
*
*
*
*
*
'
*
*
*
*
*
*.
*
(*
*
*

Wuerth--Maciste, hero of Cabi-
ria, in "The Warrior." Also "The
Eagle's Eye."

Orpheum - Douglas
in "Man From Painted
"Eagle's Eye."

Fairbanks. *
Post." Also *
*

225 E. Liberty.

Phone 1

*

and Lady Algy," at the

Arcade-EmmyWehlenI
Shell Game." Also Mutta
Cartoon. "In Cows and
Also screen telegrim.

GOOHEW FOAL

in "The
and Jeff
Cows."

*
*
*
*

* * . . . * *R
THE THEATERS

*

Flowers
Plants
Ferns

* * *' * * * * m * * * * *
--
Notre Dame Track Star Injured
Gilfillan, Notre Dame's star track
preformer, winner of the all around
championship event held at the Illi-
nois carnival, dislocated his knee
broad jumping at the Penn relay
games. This injury may keep the
Catholic's best track het out of the
meets for the rest of the season, which
would cripple the Notre Dame aggre-
gation to a considerable extent. Gil-
fillan has returned to his home in
Joliet where he' is under the care
of a specialist.
Use The Daily Classified columns.
A J!E05 T 1
I MaJES1 vIG I

D

1 ::

ii
'+
*M

Rae

Last Time Toda
William Fox's Message of ig

The

The

ever

Ten BigI
Better than "
A Dollar Show

COMING
Thursday- Friday
Saturday
may 93 10, 11

TODAY

SEE IT
The I
with

WILLIAM

10
1'
0, 1
4&;

rI

Eveni

9:30

"Lord and Lady Agl
AR CADI
SHOWS AT 3:00, 6:30, 8:oo, 9:3
isc Unless Otherwise Specified
\Vedr-l mv Weblen in "'fie SI
Gamhe."(Ret.); Nutt and Jeff C
toon, "In Cows and Caws"
Screen't'elegram.
Thur-Fri.-3-Mary Garden in
"Spndid Sinner" and ChristieCH
20C.
Sat-_ -William I'arninn in "When a 19
Sees Red ;" and "st of Tames M
goery Flagg's "Girls You KnoN
Series. "'The Bride." loc.

v. ,

'TI

Majestic-"The Belgian," featur- *
ing Valentine Grant. *

*
*
*
*

:no in
,vs 28.
Burke

'the

tI

OrpheumThea
Matinees-2:oo, 3:30
Evenings-6:30, 8:0o, 9:30
Phone-x~o-J
BOOKINGS FOR MAY
Wed-May i-Douglas Fairbani
"Man from Painted Post,"
"Eagle Eye," No. 8. (Ret.)
ThurM-F-i--2-3-Pauline Starke in
nocent's Progress." Comedy,
Janitor's Fall."
Sat-4-Margarita Fischer in
Finish." Also Weakly No. 24.
edy, lahu"
Sun-l s on-5-6--William Desmon
"The Marriage Bubble." Also
edy, "A Good Elk."
Tues- 7-Mme, Petrova il"$
Also "Elagle Eye," No. g. (Ret.
Wed-3--FannieyWard in "Or
Level." Also "Eagle Eye," N
(Ret.)

p.

Seats on Sale
Saturday May 4

" ' fi!!i!!Iti Pjitlil ll li
T

STUPENDOUS

HEART I1

THE
BELGIA

ghtest star in the Pi
was Hilda DeBar,
g nonchalance, held
>ellbound with herl
uts, to say nothing
i the "bean" balls.,
o was an important
in the capacity of
for Pi Beta Phi.
starred for the Tri
e who stepped into

E
R
C
k,',

S

STARRING

Mme. Schumann-Heink talked and
'sang recently at the Liberty Hut, Y.
M. C. A. in Washington D. C. and as
.result $65,000 worth of Liberty bonds
were sold. The crowd was so large
that is was necessary to hold -two
meetings.
The great contralto paid tribute to
the soldiers; "Let us pledge all our
boys, your son and may son, Let us
protect them and pray to God to shield

WALKER W
AND

VALENT

SHOWS

3:00

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