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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-05-01

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)HEL

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DAY AND NI
SEBN

148.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 1918.

PRICE THREE

i' BOND
IES B16
'0 536,050

OF

)UP
E SALES

ed if

ach

faculty will be asked
the third Liberty Loan
n the main corridor of
, from 8 to 12 o'clock
and 1 to 4 in the after-
Thursday and Friday.
conceived by the Uni-
tee at their meeting
at the Michigan Union.

MICHIGAMUA TO GO
ON WARPATH TODAY
FOR 10 PALEFACES
When from out the paleface wigwam
From behind the staring moon-face
Comes the slow and solemn six strokes
Telling that the Evening Spirit
Wanders over woods and meadows
Lights the campfires of the heavens.
Then the Michigamua warriors
In their feathers and their war paint
Soon will gather round the oak tree
Round the oak tree called the Tappan
There to greet the trembling paleface.
Ten in number wait the bidding
Of the loud, rejoicing redskins:
For before they take the long trail
To the home of Michigamua
Many trials and many tortures
First must show their strength and
courage
Ere the red man bids them welcome
Ere he calls each paleface "Indian""
Ere the peace-pipe smoke together.
ORAFTHTAKS ORATOR
FROM LEAGE CONTEST
3IAY NOT GET FURLOUGH FROM
CAMP, NO ALTERNATE
CHOSEN
University of Iowa's representative
to the Northern Oratorical league con-
iest to be held Friday in Hill audi-
torium may not appear here, accord-
ing to a letter received yesterady by
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the oratory
department, from Prof. Glenn N..Mer-
ry, head of the oratory department
of Iowa.
Iowa's contestant has just been call-
ed to Camp Dodge, for active service

r winding up the
ussed last night.
ressed its confi-
ul completion of
xpected that the
>scribed, with the
the goal of $200,-
bscriptions
) was- subscribed
the students and
y's share in this
00, and the stu-
makes the stu-
ind the faculty's

yesterda
khich help
s above t
In order
$45,000 t
within t
- average

he introduction of the'Liber
oth in University hall. t
e expects to increase t
the campus, and close t
a with Michigan a successf
f the honor flag.
agton, April 30.-The Liber
ubscriptions yesterday tota
443,000. This is the reco
single day in the campaig
paign total tonight was $
)0. Subscriptions by distri
g Chicago with $389,537,750
ost notable feature of the d
ords today was the spurt
ita district from 37 to 58 p
single 'day. Chicago conti
ad in honor flags, having be
3,243.
Postponed to Next Tuesd
neo Cervantes, which was
t last night in Lane hall, h,
d the meeting probably uni
iesday evening at the san
M. Jose Hernandez, of t
department, will talk on t
tin American Students' Fede
vhich was to have been tl
or last night.
will be begun soon for the a
iquet of the society which
'ularly near the end of t
semester. Last year's ba
s a great success and it
that this year's will
So.
IONS TO HAVE
'ERIENCED CAS
resentation of "Amazons"c
nd 10 marks the beginning
)licy on the part of Masqu
the organization has casti
elusively from its own me:
his year it has extendedi
to all women on the camp
interested in dramatics. TI
A1 response has insured prac
all-star cast for the produ

y's and ho may not be able to get a'
ed furlough from there in order to appear
he in Ann Arbor. It is unlikely that an
to alternate will be chosen at this late
he hour, if he is unable to appear.
he August Ceases Rehearsals
of Michigan's orator, Herman A. Aug-
ust, '19, ceased rehearsals last night
ty and will rest until Friday, the day of
he the contest. Mr. Ray K. Immel, of
he the oratory department, who is Aug-
he ust's coach, said yesterday: "The last
ful rehearsal before the contest proper
will be held tonight. August will have.
three days of rest before speaking in.
rty the finals. Rehearsals have reached
al- the stage where we feel that rest will
rd co more good for him than practice
;n. tryouts will."
2,- The order of the participating col-
cts I leges on the program will be as fol-
. lows: University of Michigan, first;
is- Northwestern, second; Oberlin col-
of lege, third; University of Wisconsin,
er- fourth; University of Iowa, fifth; Un-
in- iversity of Illinois, sixth, and Univer-
en sity of Minnesota, last.
Speeches Patriotic
As far as is known, the orators and
ay subjects of their orations by colleges
tare as follows: Herman A. August,
to '19, University of Michigan, "Thanks
.as to the Hun"; Miss Erma B.Blain,
til Northwestern university, "The Hope
meof a Greater Democracy"; the names
ie the speakers from Oberlin college
he l and the University of Wisconsin and
their subjects are unknown. Only
er the name of his oration, "Patriotism
Within," is knowntabout the Univer-
sity of Iowa's orator. "The Passing
of Traditional Policies," is the sub-
Is ject of Paul A. Bress', University of
n- Illinois, oration, and Walter B. Hey-
in ler, University of Minnesota, is to talk
is on "The Best is Yet to Be."
be The topics are all tinged with the
spirit of war and show a varied sel-
ection of subjects. The caliber of
the persons participating in the con-
T test is particularly high, all of thei
Tbeing more or less experienced in
some field of oratorical activity.
on Contestants Experienced
Minnesota's man, Walter B. Hey-
ofled, ras taken part in political cam-
es. pigning, by means of stump speaking
its and the like. Paul A. Bress, Illinois,
m- was a member of the Illinois debating
its taem that defeated Michigan in the
us Mid-West debating league last sem-
'he ester. Erma Blain is the third woman
ti- in the 27 years of the history of the
uc- league to take part in the North-
ern Oratorical league contest. Re-
m- cently, she has been making splendid
ea- Liberty Loan speeches in Chicago.
or- The representatives from these and
ro- other universities will arrive in the
city sometime Wednesday or Thurs-
ity day. The Allenel hotel will serve as
(Continued on Page Six)

CROP PROSPECTS
State Flour Would Be $30 to $50
Barrel Except For
Government
CORN IS DIFFICULT TO SHIP
TO COUNTRIES OF ALLIES
Food Riots Prevented in Large Cities
Through Government Action in
Crisis
New York April 30.-If the govern-
ment had "allowed the commerce in
wheat to take its course" flour would
be selling at the mill door fo $30
to $50 a barrel instead of $10 to $10.50
and probably "rioting would have
been experienced in all our centers of
congested population" declared Her-
bert Hoover, federal food administra-
tor, in an address here today.
Speaks at Conference
Mr. Hoover spoke at a conference
of 160 representative American
grain dealers and officials of the food
administration's grain division.
Taking up the question of why the
Allies cannot use more corn and leave
the wheat for Americans Mr. Hoover
said that corn was short lived and
difficult to ship and that the Allies
are ignorant of art of making corn-
bread.
"At the present moment our crop
'prospects look anything from 800,-
000,000 to 900,000,000 bushels of
wheat" said Mr. Hoover. "The har-
vests of the Allies look promising.
With this prospect we now have
ground for hopes of plenty for our-
selves and our Allies."
PIPR STRIKE AlEIED
BY WAR__LABOR BOARD
WORKERS PETITION FOR EIGHT
IOUR. DAY WITH PAY
INCREASED
Washington, April 30.-The war
labor board today averted a strike of
the pulp and paper workers called for
May 1, in the plant of the Interna-
tional Paper company which manu-
facturtres 60 per cent of America's
consumption, and started conciliation
of difficulties existing between com-
mercial telegraphers and New York
harbor freight handlers and their em-
ployees.
An eight-hour day andan increased
scale of pay demanded by the paper
workers was taken under consider-
ation.
Officials of the Western Union com-,
pany and the Postal company agreed'
to come before the board Saturday to
respond to a complaint presented by
representatives of the commercial
telegraph operators union that opera-
tors are being dismissed by compan-
ies all over the United States for join-
ing the union.
UNION'S WAR ACTIVITIES TO
FEATURE SMOKER THURSDAY
A discussion of the Union's war
activities and those of the University
will feature the war smoker to be held
from 8 to 10 o'clock tomorrow night
at the Michigan Union. Tickets will

cost 50 cents each, and may be ob-
tained either from the Union or from
committeemen. Only 100 tickets will
be sold.
An unusually good luncheon and
plenty of drinks and smokes are pro-
mised by those in charge of the affair.
In addition, a good program has been
arranged. Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of
the philosophy department, George F.
Hurley, '18L, president of the Union,
and Prof. Clarence T. Johnson, of the
English department, will give the
main speeches.
Music will be furnished by the
"jazz" orchestra of Uri Carpenter, '20,
and one, or two other specialities, will
be arranged.
Cornell Defeats Columbia, 9 to 1
New York, April 30.-Cornell defeat-
ed Columbia today, 9 to 1. Rees was
a puzzle to the local players who were
unable to score until Clark hit a
home run in the ninth,

Nominees for Offices to Be Voted
On at Campus Election Friday
The following men nominees for the Union, will be voted upon Fri-
day, May 3, All-campus election day:
PRESIDENT-D. W. Springer, '19, and I. A. Butler, '19L.
RECORDING SECRETARY-Ralph Gault, '19,and Charles Sul-
livan, '19A.
LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENT-John Chase, '19, and John Em-.
ery, '19.
ENGINEERING VICE-PRESIDENT-C. T. Van Dusen, '19E, C. B.
Campbell, '19E, and William Cruse, '19E.
LAW VICE- PRESIDENT -C. C. Andrews, '20L, and 0. P. Lam-
Bert, '19L.
.MEDICAL VICE-PRESIDENT-N. F. Miller, '20M, and Theodore
Squiers, '1911.
COMBINED DEPARTMENTS VICE-PRESIDENT-H. G. Lewis, '19
D, and George Wood, '19H.
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE FOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS-
Dean Henry 1. Rates, Prof. John C. Parker, and Professor. Wil-f
liam A. Frayer.,
The following men, nominees for athletic managerships, will be
Voted upon Friday, ay 3, All-campus election day:
FOOTBALL MANAGER-D. W. SPRINGER, '19E, and J. D. Cam-
eron, '19.
ASSISTANT FOOTBALL MANAGERS-J. H. Broderick, '19, C. T.
Hogan, '20E, Hart Anderson, '20, W. A. Lietzinger,'20, and 1. E. Lane,
'20E-.
TRACK MANAGERS-J. W. Clark, '19, and H. P. Bennett, '19.
ASSISTANT TRACK MANAGERS - F. W. Parsons, '20E, G. P.
Schafer, '20E, L. R. Van Ness, '20, and H. L. Popp, '20.
ASSISTANT BASKETBALL MANAGERS-S. E. Doolittle, '20 ,Wil-
uis Blakeslee, '20, Percy Quakenbush, '20, L. M. Wieder, '20, and H.
W. Heffner, '20.
The following men, nominees for the Student council, will be vot-
ed upon Friday, May 3, All-campus election day:
CAMPUS AT LARGE-P. E. Cholette, Jr., '20L, C. T Van Dusen,
'19E, John Reilly, '20, Jay Stough, '20L, Raymond Munro, '19E, and W.
t. Bell, '19M
1919 LITS-S. W. Sedgwick, F. C. Bell, and J. W. Clarke.
1919 ENGINEERS-W. M. Nugent, L. J. Hosman, and 0. H. Cart-
wright.
1919 LAWS-E. M. Hudson, W. -B. O'Connell, and L. L. Pollock.
1919 MEDICS-C. E. Sherwood, C. E. Nash, and Sidney Shipman.
1919 DENTS-J. D. Glover and C. F. Adam.
1919 PHARMICS-W. J. McGill, R. E. Spokes, and E. W. Kratz.
1919 HOMOEPS-G. P. Wood, and J. D. Van Schoick.
1920 LITS-D. F. Fagerburg, E. H. Cress, and W. G. Dade.
1920 ENGINEERS-C. T. Hogan, ). K. Mirrieless, J. L. Dickinson
S. C. Jacka, and J. i. Darbak er
The following men, nominees for the offices denoted, will be voted
upon Friday, May 3, All-campus election day:
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS-Gerald Nye, '19, C. T. Van Dusen, '19E,
Ralph Gault, '19, E. D. Kirkby, '19, J. H. Emery, '19, D. W. Springer,
'19E, R. R. Beardsley, '19, L. W. Butterfield, '19, and C. C. Andrews,
,20L
1919 ENGINEER HONOR COMMITTEE-E. L. Nugent, W. E. Grov-
es, E. C. L. Matthews, H. I. Josey, and C. P. Beath.
1920 ENGINEER HONOR COMMITTEE-Russell Kinsman, C. O.
Barton, J. A. Barger, Ted Wilson, W. G. Harbert, and C. E. Boltum.
.1921 ENGINEER HONOR COMITTEE-R. F. Grindley, H. F. Ben-
son, R. 0. Fischer, and W. A. Gram.
The following men, nominees for the Engineering society, will be
voted upon Friday, May 3, All-campus election day:
PRESIDENT-C. B. Campbell, '19E, and C. T. Van Dusen, '19E.
VICE-PRESIDENT-C. P. Beath, '19E,and T. C. Garrett, '19E.
SECRETARY-T. R. Jeffs, '19E, and H. I .Josey, '19E.
TREASURER-D. H. Rankin,'19E, and Raymond Mnro,'19E.

GERMANS FAIL IN
AgTTEMPT TO GA1O PI IN9
BATTLE OF FLANDERS COMES 'J
HALT WITH BRITISH AND
FRENCH SECURE

FOCH MAY THRO
RESERVES ON T

Reported Austrian Emperor Dang
Peace Bait In Direction
Of Italy
With the British army in'Fra:
April 30.-Further desperate smas
by Von Arnim's army against
Allies on the Flanders battlefield y
terday afternoon and evening
with no more success than the ene
attempt ealier in the the day to bi
through and capture the hill posit
west of Kemmel. Not only did
British and French maintain t
positions but during the nightt1
reclaimed several bits cif iterri
which the enemy had taken from t
Paris, April 30.-In the sector
Noyon the Germans in attacks n
today gained ground. The Fr
have now re-established their 11
according to the official commut
tion issued tonight.
In the region of Hangard there
been a violent bombardment.
Enemy Driven From Noyon
The statement adds:
"The region of Hangard was b
barder during the course of the
"In the Noyon sector a German
tack resulted in an engagemeni
which the enemy were driven out
(By Associated Press)
April 30.-Again there has con
pause in the battle of Flanders.
ground is covered Vwhh gray
bodies of .German dead and the I
ish and French are holding secu
to all their positions.
From Saturday to Mondayn
the German forces continued in t
efforts to break the British lines
the Ypres salient and to press 1
the British and French from
high ground to the southwest,
they failed.
In the hilly regions north of L
the British pushed back the enem
several points.
To the south of Amens and arc
Noyon the enemy has failed to i
forward. The British east of Vill(
Bretonneux east of Amiens have
vanced their front, and the Fr
have re-established their lines.
The Germans on various sector
the line are still hurling tons of
against the British and French i
tions.
The present halt in the battle
indicate the approach of the thi
ing into the fray the great res
army which General Foch has gat
ed. It is improbable, however,
at the meeting of the Interalliedr
council in Paris tomorrow meas
having in view the turning of the
of battle will be uppermost in
discussion.
On the Italion front there are r
procal bombardments.
In Macedonia the Serbians in the
gion of Monastir again have en
an enemy position and annihilated
garrison.
The emperor of Austro-Hungar
reported to be holding out a peace
fer in the direction of Italy. Ger
and Austrian newspapers are be
ning to express fear concerning
entry of the United States into
war.

SALOONS GO QUIETLY
AS CLOCKS TOLL TEN
Ann Arbor's "wet" era came to a
close at 10 o'clock last night, with-
out the predicted demonstrations of
wildness, and without any arrests by
the local police. In fact, the police
report that things were not any more
violent than on other nights, largely
because there were many people who
"laid in a supply" before hand.
There were, however, numerous
people who made the last round of the
saloons that remained open, and
drank for the last time toasts to the
passing booze. A spirit of "Have one
on me" prevailed, and bartenders lost
no time in dispensing with the supply
on hand. As a result very few places
were able to continue the sale of liquor
until night, but those which did found
no difficulty in disposing of the small
stock that remained.
Many of the saloons will continue
in business as lunch rooms, and soft
drink parlors. One is to be trans-
formed into a pool room, but the ma-
jority of them are serving as soft
drink parlors because it is expected
that the next legislature will pass an
amendment to the "bone dry" law
which will allow beer and wine to be
sold.
Violations against the "bone dry"'
law, although not looked for by the
local authorities, will meet with the
full force of the law, according to

Thomas O'Brien, chief of police. He
said that every man will be expected
to enforce the law rigidly. The local
authorities have been assured of the
fullest co-operation of the state, in
order that they may be able to cope
with any timuation that may arise.
Detroit, April 30.--Michigan joined
the dry states at midnight tonight-
At that hour the constitutional amend-
ment adopted by the voters 18 months
ago became operative and affected
3,285 saloons in the state.
The prohibition law is regarded as
one of the most rigid ever drafted;
its terms permitting the manufacture,
sale importation of alcoholic bever-
ages only for medicinal, mechanical
and sacremental puposes, limiting to
a small quantity the amount that may
be purchased on a physician's pre-
scription.
Detroit now becomes the largest city
in the United States dry by the vote
of its citizens. Most of the saloons
open tonight were crowded to the
last minute.

broader ca
Woman's le
econd perf
der its patr

Freshman EngIneer Assembly
Profesor 'Badger's address is one of
a series of specialization talks ar-
ranged by Prof. H. B. Merrick for the
subject of a lecture given by Prof. W.
L. Badger, of the chemistry depart-
ment, at 11 o'clock this morning be-
fore the freshman engineer assembly
in roorm 348, Engineering building.

Herald Combined With Examir
Chicago, April 30.-The Chi
Herald, it was announced today
been sold to the Illinois Printing
Publishing company and will con
date with the Chicago Examiner.
transfer is to take place tome
night. The name of the paper w
the Herald and Examiner and A:
Brisbane is to be editor. The IIJ
Publishing company has publishe
Chicago Ex-aminer, one of Willia
Hearst's papers. for a numbp

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