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April 30, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-30

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ASSOCIATEI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT W
SERVICE

0

No. 147.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

1ATE IN FAVOR
OERMAN AC T
IE[IS 1 TO 13
DMENTS RESTRICTIM POW-
R OF PRESIDENT ALL RE-
JECTED
LY CONSIDERATION
PLANNED IN HOUSE

Class Committees
Named By Women
Junior, sophomore, and freshman

TREASURY REPORTS 76 PER CENT
OF 3RD LOAN QUOTA SUBSCRIBED
Washington, April 29.-Seventy-six $262,134,400. Michigan is in the Chica-
per cent of the $3,000,000,000 Liberty go district.

girls elected the following committees IILoan minimum has been subscribed

Senators, Who Have Fought
Continuously, Finally Vote
in Favor of it

1ill

(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 29.-Rejecting all
amendments designed to limit the
President's authority, the senate pass-
ed the Overman bill today with the
general grant for the executive to
re-organize government departments
and other agencies during the war.
The votes on the measure which now
goes to the house was 63 to 13, and
many senators who opposed the ad-
ministration in the long fight over
the proposed amendment jined the
majority when the test came on final
passage.
Reed Opposes Bill
'Only one Democrat, Senator Reed of
Missouri, voted against the bill. Sen-
ator Townsend of Michigan, voted for
the bill.
Nearly all of the 22 Republicans vot-
ing to pass the bill had before the
final roll call supported amendment to
circumscribe the President's power.
President May Re-organize
The bill as passed by the senate
authorizes the President to "make
such necessary redistribution of func-
tions among executive agencies as he
may deem necessary," and "to utilize,
co-ordinate, and consolidate any ex-
ecutive or administrative commissio ,
bureaus or offices noiv existing by
law, to transfer any duties orpowers
from one department to another, or
to transfer the personnel thereof."
Report to Congress
The measure also provided that if
the President believes that any agency
should be abolished, he shall _report
to congress, and congress will ar-
range for transfer of appropriations in
any re-organization limiting their ex-
penditure to a purpose as specified by;
congress.
Early consideration of the bill in
the house is planned by administration
leaders.
CENSORSHIP MESS
BEFQREWARHEAD
Washington, April 29.-The whole
question of the American public
being kept promptly infornied as to
enemy activities both abroad and at
home, is under consideration at the
war department. Secretary Baker to-
day frankly stated that the present
system had proved unsatisfactory.{
The manner of issuing casualty lists
is another question which is
giving officials concern. Investiga-
tion of this probably will result in a
definite plan being outlined.
HOMOEOP HOSPITAL TO HAVE
ADDITION FOR CHILD CLINIC
Ground has just been broken for
a $35,000 addition to the Homoeopath-
ie hospital. The structure is to be
60 by 70 feet and will be given up en-
tirely to children. Appropriation was
made for such construction by the
state legislature a year ago. The
building is to have two stories, be-
sides a basement and an attic, and
will be constructed with reinforced
concrete, faced with brick and stone.
Under ordinary conditions the build-
ing should be completed within four
months.
The structure will include labora-
tories, X-ray rooms, and wards.
There will be two sun rooms, one on the
first floor and the other on the sec-
ond. Each will be 60 by 10 feet.
For the last year the hospital has
been overcrowded with children, and
the new addition will make it possi-
ble for a larger number to be treated

with much greater efficiency. It is ex-
pected- that a large children's clinic
will be built up.

for next year at a meeting held yes-
terday afternoon in Barbour (iymna-
sium.
For senior play committee, Hannah
Champlin, chairman, Idabelle Guthe,
assistant- chairman, Ada Arnold,
Frances MacDonald, and Jennie Ja-
Cobs.
For senior society committee,
Groeso Gaines,, chairman, Lois Dever-
eau, Hazel Beckwith, Mildred Rein-
del, and Edna Blake.
For junior play committee, Laura
Peacock, chairman, Katherine Love-
land, assistant chairman, Rose Stur-
mer, Doreen Potter, and Lucy Hoff
ma.
For junior social committee, Elsie
Erley, Marion Ames, lone Brown,
Jessie Metcalf, and Sue Verlenden.
For freshman spread committee,
Dixie England, Marcella Moon, Helen
Masters; Dorothy Hollis, Irma Schrie-
ter, Marguerite Clark, Alice Coms-
sy, Louise Duncan, Alice Beckham,
Elizabeth Paine, Martha Seeley, Dor-
othy Pilton, Roberta Berry, Ethel
Apfel, Esther Apfel, Esther Anhunt,
Gladys Reineke, Eleanor Leonard,
Esther Pafenbash, Elizabeth Roberts,
and Esther Hollands.
SECOND ORATOICAL PLAY
TO BEPRESENTEDMAY722
CAST FOR "THE SILVER BOX"
ANNOUNCED BY PROF.
HOLLISTER
Many talented actors appear in the
cast of characters selected yesterday
by Prof. R. D. T. Hollister, of the ora-
tory department, to present "The Sil-
ver Box," the second oratorical play
of the year, on May 22, in University
hall.
Experienced Actors Chosen
LaVerne Ross, grad., and Lionel G.
Crocker, '18, who played the leading
female and male roles respectively
in "The Tragedy of Nan," the oratori-
cal play presented last semester, will
again appear in leading roles in "The
Silver Box." They are excellent per-
formers in the dramatic field, Crocker
having taken part in "Phormio," the
classical club play this year, and Miss
Ross being cast to appear in Masques'
"Amazons," to be produced May 9
and 10. Another experienced actor
who will play a leading role in the
oratorical association play is Richard
A. Forsythe, '20, who has appeared in
"The Tragedy of Nan," and "Miss
Hobbs," the comedy p ealte& ay t he
Comedy club a week ago.
G. D. Wilner To Take Part
Mr. George D. Wilner, of the oratory
department, one of the best dramatic
players at the University, has been
chosen for a part in this play unus-
ually well suited for his individual
l kin- of acting. Mr. Wilner has taken
part in many plays at the University
given by the Cercle Francais, the
classical club, the orato'ical associa-
tion, and other organizations. Among
the plays in which he has appeared
are "Les Pattes de Mouche," "The
Magic Carpet," "The Pillars of So-
ciety." "The Merry Wives of Windsor,"
"The Servant in the House," the
Shakespearean pageant, "Menae-
chml," "Iphigenia in Tauris," and
"Phormio," in which he has scored
his latest success.
Remainder of Cast
Several other members of the cast
of "The Silver Box" have taken part
in some previous dramatic production.
Eva M. Bowen, '18, scored a hit with
her dramatization of a chic French

demoiselle in "Let's Go!" and M. L.
Moses, '20, also took part in "Let's
Go!" Eugene Given, '19, Carl L,
Dahlstrom, '19, and Wilfred Nevue,
'18, were in "The Tragedy of Nan."
The remaining members of the cast
are Herman A. August, '19, Gladys E.
Greening, '18, Abigail Blackburn, '18,
Mabel E. Bannister, '19, and Harry A.
Wellford, '18. Prof. R.D.T. Hollis-
ter, acting head of the oratory de-
partment, is in charge of the produc-
tion, and has already begun rehear-
sals. "The Silver Box" is a three
act comedy by John Galsworthy, one
of the greatest figures in the literary
world today.

PEP MEETING TO BOOM
CAMPUSLOAN CAMPIGN
UNIVERSITY COW10ITTEE MAKES
FINAL 'DRIVE PLANS TO-
NIGHT
Captains, lieutenants, and members
of the University Liberty Loan com-
mittee will meet at 6:30 o'clock to-
night, at the Michigan Union, to dis-
cuss plans for putting through the
campaign on the campus.
Latest returns of sales show that
students have fallen far below the
average during the last two days of
the drive. Only. $1,100 was subscribed
yesterday by the students. The total
students subscription is $32,600,
leaving a shortage of $12,000 in the
quota.
T Campaign Closes Saturday
'hecampaign closes on Saturday
night, requiring an average daily sub-
scription of $2,480 from the students if
their quota is to be filled. The average
has jumped $230 since Saturday night,
owing to the low sale of yesterday.
The faculty subscription still re-
mains unchanged, with a total of
$135,750 to their credit. No reports
have come in from their salesmen
since Friday night. The total facul-
ty oversubscription today is $55,750.
tampus Total $168,350
Faculty and student subscriptions
now total $168,350. Although the
campus quota has been oversubscrib-
ed by $43,350, the committee feels that
the studenth owe it to themselves to
raise the $45,000 asked of them. Mem-
bers of the committee are still confid-
ent that the students will subscribe
the quota necessary to win the hon-
or flag.
Tonight's meeting is intended to
rouse more pep in the workers. It
is hoped that a new interest will be
created to assure a successful com-
pletion of the campaign on the cam-
pus. An attempt will be made to
reach every student during the last.
days of the campaign.
UNION TO DISCUSS RELATION
TO GOVERNMENT AT SMOKER
Smokes, eats, drinks, music, and
speeches will constitute the program
of the war smoker to be held from 8
to 10 o'cucii Tj irsday night at the
Michigan Union. Admission wiii be-
through tickets, which may be secured
at the Union, or from committeemen,
at 50 cents each. Only 100 tickets
will-'be sold.
The purpose of the smoker is the
discussion of the affairs of the Un-
ion at the present time and the rela-
tion of that organization to the gov-
ernment in war work. It is hoped that
all those interested in the workings
of the Union will attend.
GERMANY AWARDS $1,000 PRIZE
FOR POEM DENOUNCING ENGLAND
Amsterdam, April 29.--A prize of
$1,000 has just been awarded by the
German Patriotic Party to a Hamburg
poet, Fritz von Briefen, for the "best
four-line poem denouncing England's
baseness." The prize-winning poem,
which is to be sold throughout Ger-
many in the form of wall-cards for
the benefit of war charities is trans-
lated as follows:
"The British, beaten in fair fight,
Seek our homeland peace to blight,
Let's show the world destroyer once
again
At German strength he strikes in
vain."

AMERICAN MORALS SAFE
IN rANcE5 SAYS PICARO

according to the tabulations by the
treasury tonight. In the five days re-
maining, $119,445,000 are necessary to
make the $3,000,000,000. Subscrip-
tions by districts include Chicago,

Dispatches today said that at a
meeting in Baltimore addressed by
Secretary Baker, $19,600,000 was sub-
scribed. This is to be believed to be
the largest amount subscribed at
any one meeting during the campaign.

WAR VETERAN

CALLS REPORTI

TO CONTRARY GERMAN
PROPAGANDA

John arleycorn
Kicks The Bucket
Ann Arbor and the rest of Michigan
goes "bone dry" at 10 o'clock tonight.
Between now and 10 o'clock tonight
25 saloons, two breweries. and two
hotels will close their doors against
liquor. Three of the" leading bar
rooms have already been forced to
discontinue the sale of "drinks" ow-
ing to the shortage or the supply on-
had others are expected to "run
out" before the close of the day.
The last few days of the existence
of John Barleycorn in Ann Arbor has
been unaccompanied by any of the
scenes of revelry and rowdyism
which had been generally expected,
and spectacular scenes were entirely
absent with the closing of the three
large saloons.
No Trouble Expected
"We expect no trouble tonight,"
said Chief of Police Thomas O'Brien,
"for if there would have been any
disturoance, it would have occured
Saturday night." There will be no
extra police on duty, because of the
fact that trouble that has been expec-
ted in the past few days not material-
ize, and will not. I attribute this in
a small degree to the closing of some
of the leading saloons.
"We will, however, be out with the
strong arm to enforce the regulations
(Continued on Page Six)
50 MEN SOUGHT TO FILL
COUNTYS NATALIQOT

That the American boys in France
are in no more danger morally than
they are in this country, was the
statement made by M. Jean Picard,
French soldier and lecturer, in Hill
auditorium last night. Any report to
the contrary is German propaganda,
he said.
"The American boys in khaki are
doing well, but they are tremendously
young. Their spirit is fine, and their
training as good as it is possible to
give them. When they get to France,
they will be as comfortable as they
make themselves. But it is not a mat-
ter of comfort over there, but of do-
ing the work assigned.
Boys Get Too Much Money
"Do not send your boys money," was
another statment of M. Picard. "Am-
erican boys as a rule get too much
money. Ten dollars sent to your boy
in France may be ten dollars worth of
trouble. Send useful gifts; if you
have money to send, buy war savings
stamps for the boys."-
In speaking of the duty of women in
this* country, it was emphasized that
some of the battles of the war must be
fought over here, and that the women
could help kill Germans by eating less
candy just as well as the soldiers do
with their rifles. The young men and
women are expected to remain at
school, concentrating at their studies,
and should not get nervous about the
war. They are doing their share by
working in the schools.
Moving Pictures Shown
Following the lecture, three reels of
moving pictures, taken in French
towns which are now close to the bat-
tle front, were shown. Pictures of
destroyed cathedrals, railways, and
public buildings were shown, as well
as. the reconstruction work which was
being done by the the French. Sev-
eral French cannon, shooting from
20 to 28 miles, as well as the small-
er guns, were also pictured. Th
end of the film consisted in photo-
graphs of the first contingent of Am-
erican- soldiers arriving in France
and marching to their camp in France.
SENIOR SANITARY ENGIENERS
AWAIT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDER
Senior sanitary engineers have not
yet been called to the service, al-
though word from the war depart.'
ment is expected at any moment, ac-
cording to Prof. A. J. Decker of the
engineering college. The men will
be mustered in at Washington and
will probably go through a short
period of training at an army hospi-
tal there.
At present the engineers are study-
ing the operation of the sewage dis-
posal plant of the University at the
sanitary experiment station. Their
work is chiefly the analysis of water
in connection with sewage disposal. .
ANNUAL OPERA LUNCHEON
TO BE HELD NEXT FRIDAY
Members of the cast, chorus, com-
mittees, and orchestra of 'Let's Go!"
will be the guest at the Union's an-
nual opera luncheon to be held at
7 o'clock Friday evening at the Union.
Entertainment for the crowd will
be furnished by selected members of
the opera cast, and also by the Mimes
initiation which is also scheduled to
take place Friday evening. A short
skit which is being prepared promises
to make the evening a thoroughly en-
joyable one,
M. Jose Hernandez Speaks Tonight
M. Jose Hernandez of the Spanish
department, will address El Ateneo
Cervantes on the "New Latin Amer-
ican Students' Federation," at 7:30
o'clock tonight in Lane hall.

ENSIGN
TO

COLEMAN, OF DETROIT,
EXAMINE MEN TO-
MORROW

With Washtenaw county's quota set
at but'50, naval recruiting throughout
the district is proceeding with a swing
and it seems more than probable that
when Ensign Coleman, in charge of
recruiting in Detroit, arrives in Ann
Arbor tomorrow, he will find a much
greater number of applicants ready
for examination.
'Examine 200 Men
Two hundred men in class A were
examined for the selective service yes-
terday, and all will be given a chance
to enlist in the navy before being
called for duty at Camp Custer. A
large percentage of those who passed
the draft examinations have signified
their intention of going into the navy
instead of waiting for call to Custer.
Although the recruiting agents do
not guarantee a deferred call to a na-
val training station, it is likely that
several weeks may elapse before ac-
cepted recruits will receive notifica-
tion to report for duty. Cards have
been sent out to all class 1A men who
have been accepted by the local board
for the selective service, notifying
them of their opportunity to enlist
in the nay at this late date.
Herbert Tenney to Conduit Wlrk
Col. A. C. Pack, who was appointed
recruiting agent for Washtenaw coun-
ty, was taken to St. Joseph's hospital
last Sunday night for an operation,
and his work will be carried out by
Herbert Tenney, with Phil Pack, '18,
and Seaman Roger I. Manwaring, ex-
'20, as assistants. All enlisted men
in the navy, who wish to assist in the
drive for recruits are requested to
report in uniform at the city Y. M. C.
A. any time when convenient through-
out the week, and assist in filling out
service records, furnishing informa-
tion and the like.
All others who are willing to assist
in' the drive should report at the
recruiting offices.
Col. Pack Makes Statement
"Ann Arbor and Washtenaw county
furnished the country with a company
of infantry that is now in France,"
stated Col. Pack Sunday. "They are
'over there' as volunteers in the cause
for which we are all striving. Wash-
tenaw county, needs 50 men for the
navy; we should double that quota,
and show our other boys in the trench-
es that they were not the only ones
willing to make the great sacrifice."

6GER MAN S THRE OwN
BACK BY BRITIS
HAIG'S REPORT STATE TEUTON
EFFORTS HAVE BEEN
FRUITLESS
HUNS ATTACK YPRES
FROM THREE SIDES
Washington Officials Do Not Forsee
Extensive Retirement of
British Lines
(By Associated Press)
London, April 29.-Powerful attacks
against the French and British posi-
tions by the Germans between Meter-
en and Zillebeke today were repulsed.
The Germans lost heavily, according
to the report from Field Marshal Haig
tonight.
British Hold
The British line held, but at various
points the enemy gained a foothold
in the French positions, only to be
driven out later.
The Belgians also recount heavy
attacks inflicting severe casualties on
the enemy.
The statement says:
"Following a bombardment of great
intensity today, the French and Brit-
-ish positions from between Meteren
and Zillebeke today were repulsed by
large hostile forces.
Enemy's Loss Heavy
"The 25th, 49th, and 21st British
divisions completely repulsed every
attack of the enemy to enter their
positions. The enemy's losses have
been heavy.
"The French on the hills about
Scharpenberg and Mont Rouge were
heavily attacked, and the enemy was
repulsed."
Fierce Fighting in Flanders
With the British Army in France.
April 29.-This has been one of the
bitterest days of fighting that the
Flanders battle ground has seen since
the present offensive began. Since
early morning the Germans have been
flinging great numbers of troops
against Allied lines before Zillebeke
and Laka. Bailleul, with the hills
east of Kemmel, are ultimate objec-
tives.
Ypres Incident to Hun Drive
Washington, April 29.-The battle
for the posession of the ruins of Ypres
is regarded by officials here as only
an incident to the German drive. They
do not forsee any extensive retire-
ment of the British lines.
Germany's allied armies are hurling
themselves against a wall Qn three
sides of the ruiusd city of Ypres.
After fighting of the most intense
naldire, the British line is still intact
and the enemy has lost heavily.
Objective is Ypres
The objective of the fighting that
is now going on is the capture of
Ypres which the British has held
since 1914. The present battle opened
with a bombardment from Meteren
and Voormezeele, a distance of 12
miles. Field Marshall Haig's official
reports state that the German efforts
have been fruitless.
Allies Gain at Kemmel
The battle still continues along the
front, but there is no indication that
an immediate withdrawal from Ypres

is contemplated by the Allies. The
only point where the Allies made any
gains, is south of Kemmel, the hill
where the French are standing.
While the struggle was going on
before Ypres, the British retreated
from La Bassee wood and from Lens
to Vimy.
Little Fighting On U. S. Front
Along the front in the Somme sec-
tor, part of which is being held by
Americans, there has been little fight-
'ing of note.
Germany has presented a virtual
ultimatum to Russia that able bodied
prisoners of war be sent home at
once. Only six prisoners were turned
over in exchange. If the Russian
government does not bow to the com-
mand, Germany has threatened to
take Petrograd.
British Ship Torpedoed
A British .ship carrying soldiers
has been to'rpedoed, but all the pas-
sengers and all the crew, except three
men have been landed safely.

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SENIORS

The cap and gown tradition is
worthy of your support. Wear
them Wednesday and Friday
mornings.
STUDENT COUNCIL.

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There will be a special meet-
ing of the Student council at 7
o'clock tonight at the Union. In-
terested members of the Law
school and Engineering college
are asked to attend.

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