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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 28, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SUPPLY
INEVITABLE

PEOPLE MUIIST f'IVE
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LEANING, PRESS-
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INVITED TO
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in 117 Prl
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hop Suey
.erican Dishes
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Phone 1244-M

"If some 20,000 odd people of Ann
Arbor will save each five pounds of
wheat flour, a total of 100,000 pounds,
in addition to the saving prescribed by
the government, that will go a long
way to bridge the gap in the flour
supply next July, which now is being
termed as. inevitable, by the food ad-
ministration," officials say.
The normal American consumption
of wheat for the three months, May
1 to August 1, is said to be approx-
imately 126,000,000 bushels. Already
more than 50 per cent of this wheat
has been pledged by the American
government to France, Great Britian,
Belgium, and Italy., A large part of
this is reported to have been sent, and
the remainder is to follow in a very
short time.'
Orders have been issued to hotels,
restaurants, clubs, and 'private cit-
izens everywhere to make up the. dif-
ference by stopping the consumption
of wbeat entirely. It is said that the
eating houses in the city are conform-
ing to. the regulations by united ef-
fort, but that the greatest saving can
be affected by the really patriotic peo-
ple of the country voluntarily sacri-
ficing their share to the common good.
knn Arbor people are not observing
the regulations, according to local re-
sults shown in the sale of the number
of loaves of bread. Unless the orders
are given more consideration, local
milling companies predict that Ann
Arbor will be entirely destItute of
wheat before the spring harvest.
According to physicians, any man
who can afford to buy meat, potatoes,
oatmeal ,and other similar substitutes
for wheat, will suffer no real deterior-
ation in health by absolutely abstain-
ing from wheat flour consumption for
three months. It is said that every
loaf saved will do more an equal vol-
ume of bullets can do in winning the
war.
COUNTRY FARM AGFNT RECEIVES
TWENTY \REQUEST FOR HELP
Twenty requests for help en farms
in this county are now in the hands
of Prof L. E. Osler, as present Wsh-
tenaw county farm agent.
"Men with farm experience are pre-
ferred but I do not believe that there
would be any objection to employing
those without experience who are
willing to work and learn," said Pro-
fesor Osler when asked if he thought
that farmers would employ students
who have had no experience. Only
four men from this county will be af-
fected by the recent government or-
der ,granting furloughs to all sons
of farmers who are in the draft army,
according to Professor Osler. As
stated in Tuesday's Daily applications
of students to leave the University
for farm work .are being considered
individually by a special faculty com-
mittee.
BRIEF MEETING TO PRECEDE
CLASS COMMITTEE ELECTIONS
An important meeting of women of
the freshman, sophmore, and junior
classes has been called by acting dean
Agnes E. Wells for,4 o'clock tomorrow
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, pre-
'ceding the election of class commit-
tees and council members. Miss
Wells is anxious that as many women
'as possible be present. The meeting
will last fifteen minutes and will ad-
journ to the parlors of Barbour gym-
4asium, where each class separately
will hold its elections.
At this time, judiciary council mem-
bers and social committees for the
coming year will be chosen. The
freshmen will elect the freshman

spread committee, and the sophmores
and juniors will elect the junior and
senior play committees, respectively.

First Congregational Church
. The Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas will
preach at 10:30 o'clock on the sub-
ject, "Agoraphobia." Secretary Shir-
ley W. Smith will speak to the High
School boys on "Choosing a Life
Work," and George P. McMahon, '18
will lecture to, the Plymouth Round
Table at 6:30 o'clock on his experien-
ces "With the 'Y' in France."
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church
Holy communion at 7:30 o'clock
and morning prayer and sermon at
10:30 o'clock Church school at 9:15
o'clock in Harris hall.
Unitarian Church
The Rev. F. C. Southworth, presi-
dent of Meadville Theological school,
Pennsylvania, will give the sermon at
1b:30 o'clock. Subject, "The Church
of the Living God." The Reverend
Southworth will address the Young
Peoples society at 6:30 o'clock on
the "Two Greatest Religious Leaders."
Church of Christ
Communion service at 11 o'clock.
Bible school at 12 o'clock.
German M. E. Church
Morning worship at 10:30 o'clock.
Special evening servics under the,
auspices of the Epworth league
at 7:30 o'clock Dr. T. M. Iden
of the Upper Room Bible
class will lecture on the Holy Land.
Methodist Episcopal Church
Class meeting at 930 o'clock and
morning worship at 10:30 o'clock
with sermon by the Rev. A. W. Stalker
on the subject, "Triumphant Christian-
ity." Bible school at noon and Ep-
worth league meeting at 6:30 o'clock.
Wesleyan Guild lecture at 7:30 o'clock
given by Jean Picard of France.
Bethel A. -M E. Church
Morning worship at 10:30 o'clock
with sermon by the Rev. J. A. Charles-
ton of "Experience With God." Class
meeting at 11:45 o'clock. Evening
worship at 7:30 o'clock. The Rev. H.
N. Tantsi of Elkhart, Ind. will give
the sermon.
St Thomas' Roman Catholic Church
Masses at 6, 7:30, 8:30, and 10:30
o'clock with sermon at 10:30 o'clock
by the Rev. Fr. Rottach on "Devotion
to the Holy Chost."
Presbyterian Church
"What Can We Learn About God
From Experience," theme of sermon
at 10:30 o'clock by the Rev. L. A.
Barrett. Bible school follows the
morning service. Young Pieople's
meeting at 6:30 o'clock preceded by a
social half-hour beginning at 6 o'clock,.
St. Paul's Lutheran Church
Morning sermon at 10:30 o'clock by
the Rev. H. A. Brauer on the subject,
"How is the Gospel Message Ruined
Among Men?" John VI, 60-69. Ser-
mon in English at 7:30 o'clock. Sub-
sect, "They Forgive Us Our Trespasses
as We "Forgive Them That Trespass
Against Us." Math. XVIII, 23-35.
Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran
Church
-"Good and Perfect Gif," subject of
sermon by the Rev. G. A. Neumann in
English at 9 o'clock and in German at
10:30 o'clock. Young People's league
meets at 6:30 o'clock.
Zion Lutheran Church
Sermon at 10:30 o'clock by the Rev.
E. C. Stellhorn on "Being Offended at

Jesus." Evening service at 7:30 o'-
clock with sermon on the subject,
"Help From an Unexpected Quarter."
Trinity English Lutheran Church
Morning worship with sermon by the
Rev. Lloyd M. Wallick at 10:30 o'clock
on the subject, "A Lesson in Con-
stancy." Evening service at 7:30 o'-
clock.
Seventh Day Adventist Church
Song service at 7:1 o'clock, fol-
lowed by evening service at 7:30 o'-
clock. Sermon subject, "Is the Beast
of Berlin the Beast of Rev. 13?"

Neckties and

Calikms
Drug
Co.

TER

Men's Furnishings

Varsity Togg
1107 s. Univer

TO TALK WE1

a

Eat a Plate of our Iee Ci
I e Cream is food if it's made from pure and fr
Ours is, We know it because we make

SEASON.

Fountain of Y(
I Corner State and Liberty

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How Easy.

no one who has served on the publica-
tions during the year is eligible or
capable of filling one of the leading
positions for, the ensuing year. When
such circumstances arise, the board
finds it necessary to consider outside
candidates. This notice should not
be considered as an intimation that
these circumstances will arise this
year.
All applications for these positions
should be in the hands of Professor
F. N. Scott, on or before May 8, in
order to be considered. Each appli-
cation should contain a statement of
the experience of the applicant and
should be accompanied by any letters
of recommendatio which he may

HE electric way is always the easiest way.
ing, it is also the most convenient, cleanest
expensive way. The Electric Grill is the
electric cooking devices. It combines the handy
of all the others. It consists of only four prir
simple parts, all of which are easily kept clean.
You can toast on the glowing coils of calo
You can grill, boil and stew in the grill and stew p
can fry in the cover of the stew pan. This c
aluminum, therefore, you can bake uan cakes on i
using grease.
This all-round cooking device can be readil
.any member of a family. It is a great time saver
stantial and practical in every way.
Come in and see us cook by it, or bc Lter s-
cooking yourself if you wish.
The Detroit Edison Co.
F

IN CONTROL OF STUDENT
1ICATIONS.

B SUBJECT OF
EBY PROF. FR AYER

"Americanism," will be the subject
ng
of a lecture by Prof. W. A. Frayer at
nDS:
yle, 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in Sarah
ian, Caswell Angell hall. This is one of the
nth- series o lectures arranged by Miss
the Agnes E. Wells, acting dean of women,
the primarily for those women who are
to organized for patriotic educational
to work. It is, however, open to all.
osi- Professor - Frayer's subject is one of
the the most important to be presented
in this group, which deals with the
hat war in all of its larger aspects.
A. am m - -

Realize for yourself the
pleasure of Home Cooked
Food. Prices Reasonable.
Service Paramount.

TRUBEYS
218 S. Main Street

F

II

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

Good Lunches of Rice and Milk
10C all the time
Chinese and Ameri can CHOP SUEY
Short Orders
Michigan Inn 601 E. Liberty
Soph Lits Nominate Councibnen
Nominations were made yesterday
afternoon for Student councilman by
the sophomore literary class in which
Earl H. Cress, William G. Bade. and

IN proo of the
"suing is be

its

Cheap-An 18 foots canoe
Idles and in fine condition.
e season. Storage paid up to
Can be seen at Saunder's
ivery.

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

Dewey F. Fagerb
One man will be el
the All-campus ele
Our Merchant ad
the progressive bu

cov-

tisers r

our ! GRINNELL BROS., 116 s. Main St.

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