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April 27, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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i

I

HIGH morale and neat appearance are
inseperable - in business and profess-
ional life as well as in the fighting
force.
You men who control the destiny of
industrial America will find the qual-
ies you need-the snap of youth, the
dignity of age, the refinement of ex-
perience and the acme of value-best
expressed in
Smart othes
INIJENSCIIMITT APFL&O

JATURDiAY
I J ATLESS ~
j~i Z XQM '?A!(T T roan- s
ADMINISTRATION ORDERS
WHEATLESS MEAL TODAY'
MUST OBSERVE RESTRICTIONS
SATURDAY AS OTHER
DAYS
"One wheatless meal on Saturday,"
orders the food administration. "Use
no bread, crackers, pastry, or break-
fast foods containing wheat. Stren-
uous conservation measures must be
put into effect by patriotic citizens in
order to alleviate the problem of feed-
ing the Allies until the next harvest."
The administration urges that po-
tatoes be consumed in larger quanti-
ties. Thousands of bushels of pota-
toes have been reported lying on
Michigan farms, unused. In addition
to this, physicians recommend pota-
toes as a more nourishing substitute
that the other articles used in the
manufacture of bread.
"Each load of potatoes sold now
helps to send wheat across the seas
and make the Kaiser mad," was the
message recently flashed from the de-
partment of agriculture in Washing-
ton. "Potatoes are inexpensive and
good wholesome food, and it is the
duty of every householder to use them
in as many ways as possible."
In spite of the number of govern-
ment regulations for the conservation
of wheat, it is said that people are
not observing the wheatless meals.
The regulations call for all meals to
be wheatless on Mondays and Wed-
nesdays, and one wheatless meal on
the other days. The fact that people
of Ann Arbor are not familiar with
these regulations is shown by the
manner in which they have been dis-
regarded.
Recruiting Off ice
Displays Relics

REGENTS' POWER GROWS
DURING YEARS SINCE 1837

I Early Spring Showing t

ORIGINAL

APPOINTEES

m1

LARGELY INCOMPETENT
POLITICIANS

WTERE

Society Brand and
Hickey-Freeman Suits

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LAN DERS
OR
LOWERS

PHONE 294

213 E. LIBERTYI

ANN ARBOR GARAGE
DEALERS IN
U~u D jROTHERS

MOTOR CAR
$$0 W. HURON aI

9;

PHONE t1101

CASCO -2/ r.
CLYDE -2'/8 in.
Cl
FOR SPRING
Cluou.peabody U Co. InC. Mah rs
DEGREE RECOMMENDATION
CABLED ANDREW VAN. LOPIK
"Degree recommended" was the
cable sent by Dean J. R. effinger to
Lieut. Andrew Van Lopik, "Some-
where in France," former member
of the 1916 class of the University.
At the meeting of the literary fa-
culty Monday evening, Lieutenant Van
Lopik was recommended for gradua-
tion. This is the first time in the
history of the University, and it is
thought the first time in the history
of any American universitly, that a
student was notified by cable of his
recommendation for graduation. His
name will be presented to the board
of regents at its next meeting, May
3, as candidate for - the degree of
Bachelor of Arts,
Lieutenant Van Lopik is a member
of the Twenty-sixth Infantry, United
States America, and is now stationed
in the trenches. He was a student at
the first officers' training camp at
Fort Sheridan, and was afterward or-
dered overseas, - having been there
since September. His home is in
Grand Haven.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

150 ALIEN, WOMEN
TO REGISTER HERE
Registration of female German
aliens has been announced for Wash-
tenaw county by the department of
justice at Washington.
According to instructions received
by Mayor Ernest Wurster, the registra-
tion will be conducted in the same
manner as the recent registration of
male German aliens. The date has
not yet been set. It is estimated that
approximately 150 women will be af-
fected by this ruling in Ann Arbor.
The letter in part reads, "The plan
of the registration of the German alien
women, who are estimated to be about
the same in number as the German
male aliens, will be substantially that
followed in the registration of German
males."
Mayor Wurster informed the attor-
ney general yesterday that the nec-
essary instructions will be given to
the chief of police, and that the work
will be undertaken here upon receipt
of further orders.
MARRIED LIFE CO MENDED
BY MRS, JULIET Vr STRAUSS
"It is a pet idea of mine that the
great majority of married couples
love each other, sensational newspa-
pers, putrid fiction and the divorce
dockets to the contrary, notwithstand-
ing." This is a characteristic expres-
sion of Mrs. Juliet V. Strauss, lec-
t urer and author, who will speak in
Ann Arbor for the first tizau at 6:30
o'clock Sunday night before the
Methodist guild.
Mrs. Strauss first become known
under the nome-de-plume of the
"Country Contributer" in the Indian-
apolis Journal. Since the publication
of her lecture entitled "Where Mother,
Gets Her Halo" which she will give
Sunday night, she has been a regular
contributor to the Ladies Home Jour-
nal in the "Ideas of a Plain Country;
Woman."

War relics in the windows of the
British recruiting office on Main
street, have been attracting much no-
tice from passers-by. Among the col-
lection is a Boche saw-tooth bayonet
taken from a German prisoner at
Ypres in 1915, Sergeant Fox, who is
in charge of the recruiting here, said
that only certain regiments are equip-
ped with "this pleasant little device."
Parts of the first Zeppelin brought
down in England, at Cuffley, are also
shown, together with parts and
"splinters" of shells and fuses. Two
helmets, one of the old type used
in the war, are being exhibited. A
pair of shoes worn by Captain Baxter,
of Detroit, for two weeks in the bat-
tle of the Somme, are shown in the
same condition as after the battle.
Sergeant Fox has been for a few
days, and purposes to give men the
opportunity to avoid the coming draft
by treaty betweet England, Canada,
and the United States. A list of 119
British subjects in the vicinity, who
will be affected by the proposed treaty
between the countries, is in the hands
of the men in charge. Friendly aliens,
exclusive of Americans, will be re-
ceived by the recruiting officers after
proper physical examination.
The Canadian tank corps is highly
recommended to college men as an
interesting branch of service by the
Sergeant. No one but a college stu-
dent is permitted to enter, and ac-
cording to the men in charge, appoint-
ment for high offices will inevitably
folloM. Another interesting branch
is said to be the Royal flying corps,
but this is open to others thn eobilege
students.
Barristers Initiate 10 Junior Laws
Barristers, senior law honorary so-
ciety, will initiate 10 junior laws this
afternoon at its annual spring initia-
tion.
The initiates are to stand for two
hours with hands and heads in stocks,
having been convicted of contempt of
court, and contumely of the law.
Dancing Friday and Saturday nights
at the Armory.-Adv.

By the Act of 1837, a tract of lan
was set aside on whih to locate a
university where the higher banches
of education might be taught to those
settling in the middle west. But be-
fore work on the proposed buildings
could be started, it was found neces-
sary to select a body of men to act as
the executive head, to manage the uni-
versity fund, superintend all construc-
tion, and secure a faculty of compe-
tent men.
Twelve regents were chosen for a
term of four years, to undertake the
task, their appointment coming
through the power of the governor,
approved by the state senate and a
chancellor to act ex-officio in the ca-
pacity of president. The committee
was made a corporate body and could
make all laws governing the affairs
of the University.
Members Were Politicians
Many of the members were poli-
tical men, who made this work secon-
dary to politics, and subsequent events
proved the lack of real ability on the
part of some of the men. To avoid
public criticism, several cleogymen
were placed on the board.
Without considering the cost, the
committee had a New Haven architect
draw plans for a central building,
which if completed, would have used
up most of the fund set aside for the
maintenance of the college. But after
much discussion, it was decided to
erect a main building, with two dor-
mitories , and four houses for the pro-
fessors. As the University gradually
increased in size, the two dormitor-
ies were converted into recitation
rooms, and are now known as the
north and south wings of University
Hall, while the houses of the profes-
sors became places to take care of
the surplus students.
Powers of Board 'Increased
With the elapse of time, the powers
of the Board of Regents have increas-
ed until they have the control of re-
gulating all courses of study, appoint-
ing the prescribed number of pro-
fessors, regulating their salaries,
granting degrees, and giving diplomas.
Since the natal day of this execu-
tive body, June 5, 1837, there have
been more than 130 regents, many
remaining in office more than one
term, and although some were hardly
a credit to their position, the majority
of these have performed their work
well without recompense.
MI LITARY NEWS
Make up drills will be held from 10
to 12 o'clock this morning in Water-
man gymnasium.
If the weather permits a hike will
be held from 1:30 to 5 o'clock this
afternoon. The cadets will form in
front of Waterman gymnasium.
A number of exchanged uniforms
have arrived from the clothing manu-
facturers. Comiencing Monday the
cadets, who requested a change of
size, may obtain the uniforms between
the hours of 1 to 3 o'clock every after-
noon, in the old band room in the
Natural science building.
Through a misunderstanding, the
company that is now known as "L,"
of the First regiment will hereafter
be called company K, First regiment.
The cadets in this company are new
men, and they will form in line to the
let-t - 41 iaffqhta tl t
which now falls in on the corner of
North and East University avenues.

Three baseball diamonds have been
laid out by Dr. George A. May, for the
inter-company games. The men will
be requested to furnish their own
fielding gloves, although an effort will
be made to supply the teams with a
sufficient supply of catcher's mitts
and chest protectors. Dr. May has
issued a call for any surplus equip-
ment that the men might have on
hand. A playing schedule will be an-
nounced tomorrow.

Also just received a line of Spring Hats and Caps

Saunders' Canoe Livery
On the Huron River
Canoes for sale on easy payments
Used Canoes for sale $10.00 up
Canoes for rent by the hour, day, week
or trip
New Canoes for rent by the season
Drink Mann Malted Milk

Between the Theatres

I

I

..............
WMMNMMMI

FOR

I

Because he makes the Best

I,

AT
MANN'S DRUG STORE
213 Main Street Phone 876

FLOWERS

I

of every description

See

CiH1002 S.
Cousins &all UNIV.AVE.

U,

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association I

Fowls And Dogs
Destroy Gardens1
Chickens and dogs must be re-
strained from running at large, owing
to numerous complaints of depreda-
tions being committed in war gar-
dens, according to Mayor Ernest M.
,Wurster and the police department.
Instructions from Federal Food
Administrator Prescott read in part:
"Will you kindly instruet your chief
of police to see that no chickens or
live stock are permitted to run at
large, and deal with those who wil-
fully ignore your orders, to the full
extent of the state laws and your lo
.cal ordinances."
In accordance to these instructions,
Mayor Wurster announces that the
rule in regard to chickens, dogs and
other live stock will be strictly en-
forced, and people who own chickens
or animals of any kind, are warned to
keep them confined. Police have re-
ceived instructions to take rigid
means to secure obedience.
"The great need of the present is
plenty of food, and all people must
understand that nothing that can be
prevented will be allowed to inter-
fere with production, or to endanger
the most perfect possible results of
the war gardens which the people have
planted, or may plant this season."
Mayor Wurster said yesterday.
COL. PACKA -NAYAL
RECRUITING OFFICER
Col. A. C. Pack, of Ann Arbor, has
been appoined naval recruiting officer
for 'Washtenaw county, and has ap-
pointed assistants to take charge in
various sections of the county. Colonel
Pack will be assisted in the city by
Herbert B. Tenny, and for a short
time by Roger Manwaring. Mr. Man-
waring is home on a furlough from
the navy, to recuperate from an at-
tack of penumonia.
Headquarters for local recruiting
will be at the City Y. M. C. A., and
will be visited every week by an offi-
cer from the recruiting office in De-
troit. .Preparations are being made
to furnish information regarding the
navy to any person interested, be-
tween the ages of 18 and-44.
Philip C. Pack, of the 1918 graduat-
ing class of the University, and son of
Colonel Pack, has been appointed one
of the assistants. He will begin re-
cruiting soon in various parts of the

!' //'

1(11'

I

i

4 L'

II,

I

is
be
as

afety first
quite as much a warning
careful about what you
to what you do.

We can't say it too loud
season in regard to hats
our idea is to buy by name.

allory
Hats'

I.

are so well and widely known
that you are perfectly safe
to come in. our store, say
to us, get your hat
and nevefgive quality a
thought.
We're not so sure about some
other hats.
We played "safety first" when
we bought-you can do the
same.
Come in and see the new Spring
models in the latest shades and
come now.

keaYe Copy
at at
IaeaYs Dopy ICLASSIFI
Quarry's and Students'
118 Dslta Supply Sine .

FOR S$"
FOR SALE-Cheap-An 18 foot canoe
with paddles and in fine condition.
Used one season. Storage paid up to
May 15. Can be seen at Saunder's

WANTED
WANTED- In opportunity to mv
you. Let us help you through this
column of The Michigan Daily.
WANTED-An opportunity to a rv
with Daily reaiers.-Adv.

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons; Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger; and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELLIBROS, 116 s. Main St.

309 S. MAIN

F. WORDRS

EXTRA VALUE
Ready Suits..........

country.

I

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