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April 25, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DM WILHELM!

LET'S STEER C

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Iailll

ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SER VTCE

o. 143.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 1918.

PRICE THRE

TSBL

31IN
GAS
IS END

OF CAMPAIGN ONLY
AWAY, SA.LES
ECCREASE
LL NEEDED
MPLETE QUOTA

nn Leads; Women
850; Mortarboard
ells $3,700

Sub-

PROF. H. R. CROSS
ENTERS SERVICE
Prof. Herbert R. Cross, of the fine
arts department, has been accepted
by the American Red Cross for ser-
vice in Italy. He expects to sail about
May 8, for duty overseas.
Professor ;Cross will receive the
grade of a commissioned officer in
his new position, and will be placed
on excutive work for the American
Red Cross in Italy, with which country
he is well acquainted through pre-
vious travels made there in connec-
tion with heis art studies. The person
who will take charge of Professor
Cross' classes during his absence will
be decided upon at the next meeting
of the Board of Regents, to be held
May 3.
An indefinite leave of absence will
be granted Professor Cross by the
University, as he ls' expecting to con-
tinue his new task for the entire du-
ration of the war.
"I have received so much of the
best in my professional education
from Italy that I welcome the oppor-
tunity to serve her now in her hour
of need. I count myself lucky to be
given the opportunity to serve my
own country, and at the same time the
country that has done so much for
me," said Professor Cross, in com-
menting on his new appointment.
R.E.T.C.-MEDIC DISPUTE
BECOMES, MORE ACUTE

Reorganize Army Signal Corps
Washington, April 24.-Reorganization of the army signal corps
with John D. Ryan, New York copper magnate and financier, as di-
rector of aircraft production, was announced tonight by Secretary
Baker.
Major-General Squier, chief signal officer, hereafter will devote
himself exclusively to administration of the signal branch. A new
division of military aeronautics is created under the direction of
Brigadier-General Kenly. The aircraft board continues in its advis-
ory capacity with Mr. Ryan, chairman, instead of Howard Coffin who
remains a member of the- board

* * * *

*- *_

LOAN 1PROGRESS

*1

rday's
ntions

faculty sub-
student sub-'

iptions.............
sulty total...........
dent total ............
npus total ............ $1
npus goal-............$2
dent. quota '.........$
ount students must
aise to get honor flag..$1

*
1,550 *
*
2,050 *
29,150 *
25,100 *
*
54,250 *
00,000 *
45,000 *
*
19,900 *

*
* * * * * * * * * * * 7

s slump In

the Liberty1

Loan drive is becoming more notice-
able as the end of the time limit set
for the campaign gradually approach-
es. Yesterday's sales among the stu-
dents were $1,450 less than on the
preceding day, making the situation
appear rather discouraging to the
University committee. The sales yes-
terday were the lowest since the cam-
pus- drive began.
The student quota of $45,000 still
lacks $19,900 of being raised.
An average of at least $2,000 a day
must be raised within the next 10
days, if the three-barred honor flag
is to fly on the campus. The amount
raised by the students during the sec-
ond Loan was three times the sum
asked for now, and the committee
feels that the students. ought, to do
their share by subscribing the quota
assigned them.
The team of John D. Hibbard, '18E,
is so far in the lead in the amount
raised among the men, with a total
of $5,300 to its credit. The other
teams have raised the following sums:
H. A. Knowlson, '18E, $4,100; Albert
E. Horne, '18, $3,400; F. H. Tinsman,
'18D, $2,750; Stephen S. Attwood, '18E,
$2,350. Miscellaneous subscriptions
among the men amount to $350.
The women's subscriptions total
$6,850, of which the Mortarboard team
raised $3,700, and the Wyvern team,
$3,150, the senior society still being
in the lead.
HE WOULD CERTAINLY ENLIST
IF IT WEREN'T FOR THE WARI
St. Paul, Minn., April 24.-The prize
package patriot has been discovered
here. Sergeant Carl Hauge of the
local United States marine recruiting'
force encountered him.'.'
"Don't you want to enlist?" the
sergeant asked him.
"No, I guess not."
"Why?"
"Well, it certainly isn't because I'm
not patriotic. Why, if it wasn't for
the war I'd have been in the service
long ago."
The sergeant was carried back to
the recruiting station in a coma. He
will recover.
British Sink German Destroyer
Berlin via. London, April 24.-In
the British naval raid Tuesday morn-
ing. on the German submarine bases
on the Belgian coast five cruisers,
three destroyers, and a number of
motor boats were sunk by the fire of
the coast batteries, the German ad-
miralty announces.

MILITARY AUTHORITIES TO
FORCE GOVERNMENT
ORDERS

EN.

The situation in the R. 0. T. C.
medical student squabble stood last
night with the military department of
the University prepared to enforce
the recent government war order from
Washington requiring all medical stu-
dents in the R. 0. T. C. course to make
up all back drills. Matters have be-
come more acute with the refusal of
the majority of the medical students
.involved in the squabble to recom-
mence their drilling.
. Prof. Frederick G. Novy, of the
Medical school, stated that he would
not excuse any medical students who
were members of his laboratory sec-
tions extending to 6 o'clock for the
he said, "and I shall not do it this
purpose of drilling in the R. 0. T. C.
"It has not been done in past years,"
he said, "and Ishall not do it this
year."
Lieut. William's View
Lieut. Losey J. Williams said in
regard to the protest of the medical
students against making up drills:
"The men in the medical school who
have enrolled in the R. 0. T. C. course
will be expected to make up drill
just as anyone else in the course.
Under general orders 49, the students
bf the different schools in the Uni-
versity who have enrolled in the
R. 0. T. C. are all treated alike.
No Man to. Be Excused
"No man in any of these schools
will be excused from attendance of
drills except for reasons of physical
disability or any sufficiently war-
ranted excuse because of illness or
similar reason. Any man in the medi-
cal school who fails to make up his
drill will be treated just as any other
man in any other school in the Uni-
versity who failed to attend drills."
Galens' Committee
A special committee, representing
Galens, upperclass medical honorary
society, has made the following re-
solutions at a special deliberation
meeting: "This society does not ask
that partiality be shown to the medi-
cal students enrolled in the R. 0. T. C.
If, according to general orders 49, no
man will be excused from attendance
of drills except for reasons of physi-
cal disability or any sufficiently war-
rantable excuse because of illness or
similar reason, and conflicts with
scholastic work are not considered
(Continued on Page Six)

WILL PRESENT ERLY
FRENCH PLAS TONIGHT
CERCLE FRANCAIS PRODUCTIONSI
DATE FROM EIGHTEENTH
CENTURY
"Laugh, and the world laughs with
you,
Weep, and you weep alone."3
Sincerely believing in the efficacyc
of this old saying as a panacea for alli
the ills of the world, the Cercle Fran-
cias has gone back to the early eigh-
teenth century, finding there "Lel
Retour Imprevu" and "L'Avocat
Patelin," two comedies, which it has
prepared for presentation at 8 o'clock
tonight in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
How well fitted each of these plays
is to carry out the purpose for which
it has been selected can only bei
judged from the fact that one of themJ
comes from the pen of an author con-
sidered by many to be the leading
comic poet and playwright since the
time of Moliere, while the other is
claimed by some critics to be the best
of the earlier farces to which - thei
modern stage has fallen heir.
French Custom
Arrangements have been made to
follow out French custom as far asi
possible in the production. No orches-
tra will be employed, the opening of
the play being announced by the
usual three raps behind the scenery.
Man's place as an usher will be us-
urped by woman, this condition hav-
ing become quite common even in
America since the opening of the war.
French Officers to Attend
The French atmosphere will be
even further realized by the presencea
in the audience of eight or ten officers
from the land of the fleur-de-lis who'
are coming to Ann Arbor from Camp
Custer for the express purpose of
witnessing these plays.
Between the two performances,
lone A. Wilber, School of Music, lead-'
ing lady in this year's Union opera,
will sing "Menuet de Martini," a
shepherd song of the eighteenth cen-
tury, arranged by Weckerlin.
THREE MICHIGAN MEN QUALIFY
FOR POSITIONS AS OFFICERS
Washington, April 24.-Three men,
former students of the University of
Michigan, and 16 others have quali-
fled for appointments as second lieut-
enants in the United States army, at
the third officers' training camp, Fort
Oglethorpe, Ga. They will be placed
on the eligible list to be ready for
service when vacancies occur.
Kenneth S. Keyes, '17, Detroit,
Lyndly A. Walking, ex-'19, Merrill,
and William A. McKinley, ex-'18E,
Detroit, are the three students men-
tioned in the official qualification list.
SECRETARY McADOO APPEALS
FOR LOAN OVERSUBSCRIPTION
Washington, April 24.-Another plea
to loan committees not to stop work-
ing after communities reach their
Liberty Loan subscription quota, was
sent out today by Secretary McAdoo.
The aggregate of reports up to the
opening of business today is $1,790,-
478,150. .

PLANS FOR SWING-OUT
COMPLETEDBY COUNCIL
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS WILL.GIVE
PRINCIPAL ADDRESS
- OFDAY
Plans for the program and the lines
of march for senior Swing-out tomor-
row have been completed by the stu-
dent council committee " in charge of
affairs.
Seniors will assemble on the cam-
pus walks in caps and gowns shortly
before 4 o'clock. The senior lits and
foresters will form on the walk run-
ning from University hall to the Mu-
seum. The engineers and architects
will line up on the walk running from
University hall to the Angell resi-
dence. Graduate students will meet
on -the walk running from University
hall to the flag pole. The medics,
laws, and dents will form -in the
above order on the walk :running
from the flag pole to the Chemistry
building.
The homoeops and dents will meet
on the walk running from the Chem-
istry building to Waterman gymna-
sium.

NAME CHAMP CLARK
TO SUCCEED STONE
Jefferson City, Mo., April 24.-Gov-
ernor Gardiner tonight tendered to
Champ Clark, speaker of the house of
representatives, the appointment as
senator to succeed the late William J
Stone.
Senator William J. Stone, chairman
of the committee on foreign relations,
died at Washington, Sunday, April
14, after a stroke of paralysis. He
was ill for five days.
Senator Stone first entered the Un-
ited States senate in 1903, where he
has served until his death. His pre-
sent term of office was to have ex-,
pired in 1921.
JUNIOR LITERARY CLASSES
TO NOMINATE COUNCILMEN
There will be an important meeting,
of the junior literary class at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in the Univer-
sity Hall. The meeting is called for
the purpose of nominating student
council representatives, who will be
voted upon at the All-campus elections
to be held May 3.
Story of Spain Is
In New Inlander
"Inlander today?" Of course you
can borrow your roommate's copy, or
simply assume an air of tacit intellig-
ence, but everybody will be talking
about the April number of the Inland-
er when it appears on the campus
Friday morning. Do you know any-
thing about Spain and bull fighting
and toreadors and, well, Gehenna? If
not,- buy an Inlander. Professor
Schurz's article bears the genuine
label-"Made in Spain."
Furthermore, there is a one-act
play, "The Talisman," by F. S. Al-
roy, the campus Rabelais-the kind
that Sam Hume's players produce in
Detroit. You know everybody likes
them. The Henry James devotee will
find Marion Holden's "Reality," a de-
licious morsel of intellectual manna.
There is a further suggestion of man-
na in Hazel Fuller's "Good Samar-
itan," and perhaps, if one looks hard
enough, in Roy Fricken's potpourri
"On Collecting Things." Of poet lore
we have Muriel Babcock's "Carnival
Night," Mary E. Oakes' "Apollo," and
Margaret Cooley's "Reflections," on
smiles and other things.
WASHINGTON PAINTED ON RHINE,
NOT DELAWARE, SAYS CROSS
"The widely-known picture of Wash-
ington crossing the Delaware is really
a picture of Washington crossing the
Rhine," said Prof. Herbert R. Cross,
of the fine arts department, in an il-
lustrated lecture on "Washington and
Lincoln; Instruction of Painting" last
night in Alumni Memorial hall. "This
was occasioned by the fact that a
German artist was the painter of this
famous pose of the father of our
country, in the well-known Delaware
episode resulting in the drawing in of
the Rhine river into the background
of the picture instead of the Dela-
ware."
"The figure of Washington lends It-
self most readily to painting, while
Lincoln is more adapted to sculptural
work," stated Professor Cross. "Lin-
coln was the bane of artists, just as
he was the bane of tailors and 'other
small minded people," he said.
Lincoln Penny
Another point made by Professor
Cross was that the use of Lincoln's

figure on the Lincoln penny, the
smallest of. our coins, is illustrative
of the democratic spirit so charac-
teristic of him. Barnard's statue of
Lincoln to be found in Cincinnati, the
subject of so much are discussion to-,
day, was declared by the lecturer to
be one of the grandest and noblest
works of Lincoln, as well as of Ame-
rican art in genertl. A number of
lantern slides were shown.

CHRMANS PON
ALLIE INFNTR
1H:Al REPORTS ATTACK ON BJ
NORTH OF ALBERT
REPULSED
VILLER-BRETONNEUX
CAPTURED BY ENEI
Teutons Gain Footing Northwar
Hangard-en-Santerre; French
Fight Desperately
London, April 24. - Field Mar
Haig reports that the Germans h
taken Viller-Bretonneux.
The text of the statement says
'This morning after a violent b
bardment, the enemy attacked
whole front soth of the Somme
French on our right and was
pulsed."
"Later in the morning an at
on our positions in this sector
renewed and repulsed. Fighting
severe throughout the day at Vi
Bretonneux.
"Other attacks by the enemy
morning on the north bank of
Somme and north of Albert were
pulsed.
"By a successful operation car
out this morning northwest of F
ubert, a post captured by the en
was regained."
Germans Gain Footing
With the British army in Fra
April 24.-The first German at
along the whole British front sout
the Somme river was thrown I:
but the Germans returned and pu
along toward Villers-Bretonneux
ing three tanks. The Germans g
footing in the eastern fringe of
town where the battle is still
ing.
Attack Villers-Bretonneux
The Germans attacked along
line of Villers-Bretonneux, Hang
Hailles and Castel. Villers-Breton:
was the storm center. The stor
infantry was accompanied by the t
tanks which at the latest report
battled forward into the eastern
skirts of the town.
Local Fighting
Berlin, April 24.- "On the b
field of the Lys and the Somme,
fighting activity was limited to
action," says the official commu:
tion tonight.
Enemy Resumes Hammering
April 24.-After three weeks of
paration in the Somme, the Geri
have resumed their hammering
Amiens. For days there has
heavy artillery firing. The firs
tacks were repulsed, but later
enemy took Villers-Bretonneux.
The fighting on the remainder o
front, so far as it is known, has
resulted in any notable retiremer
the part of the Allies.
Expect Attack on Somme
- An attack on the line in the ,
me region has been expected, a
(Continued on Page Six)

In case of rain students will
directly in University Hall.
To Start at 4 o'clock

meet

The march will start at 4 o-
clock with James Schermerliorn Jr.,
'18, president of the senior literary
class leading the. procession. Lois
May, vice-president of the literary
class will follow leading the women.
The lits will be followed by the en-
gineers, the architects, the graduate
students, the medics, the laws, the
pharmics, the homoeops and the dents.
Master of Ceremonies
The address of the afternoon will
be delivered by President Harry B.
Hutchins.
Philip Carrol is to be master of
ceremonies at the exercises which will
follow in University Hall. The Rev.
Mr. Stalker, of the Methodist Episco-
pal church, will give the invocation.
Mr.. James Hamilton, instructor of
singing in the School of Music, will
follow with a solo "The Trumpeter,"
by Dix. Wilson J. Kellar, School of
Music, will accompany Mr. Hamilton.
Following the singing of "America,"
the senors will leave by the front
doors and, marching to State street,
will swing the campus in a block "M"
going down State street to Sbuth
University avenue, down South Uni-
versity to the Engineering arch, back
onto the campus to the flag pole, then
south to the gymnasium and back to
State street by the way of North
University avenue.
Visitors will be admitted to the
balcony in University Hall.
Ralph Gault, '19, was appointed by
the student council, chairman of the
committee for Swing-out day.
Senior Lit Caps and Gowns Arrive
Senior lit caps and gowns have ar-
rived and may be procured from
George Moe and George Kyer. In
addition to those for which orders
were taken, a number have been re-j
ceived for men who have neglected
to order caps and gowns and who are
now desirous of obtaining them.

,
*

E * * * , * * * *
ENGINEERING ASSEMBI

* Assemblies will be held in
* engineering college this mor
" as follows:
* Seniors, room 348, 9 o'cloc
* Speaker:- Prof. John C. Pai
* "Michigan Spirit."
* Juniors, room 348, 10 o'cloc
Speaker: Prof. W. A. Fra
* "The Situation in France."
* Sophomores, room 348, 11
* clock.
* Speaker: Prof. G. W. Dov
* "The Cost of Living."
*
* * * * * * * * * * .*

SARAH,

TONIGHT

at

8 o'clock

CERCLE

CASWELL

|ELL

LE RETOUR IMPREVU and L'AVOCAT PATELIN
Admission 50, 75, $1.00 or Membership Ticket

FRA

P LA

SEATS AT

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