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April 24, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-24

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at

PRES
DAY AND NIG
SERVJ(

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24, 1918. .
"111 m l im 1i m 1a m 111 11m n m 11111111m 1m 11 11m111111a m1 li11ml111 1 a m n,, , e

NU PLOTTER SHOOTS
FELLOW DURING TRIAL

l'

of the

have
were

RAM CHANDRA, REVOLUTIONIST,
IS KILLED BY RAM SINGH WHO
DIES IN TURN
San Francisco, April.-A sensational
climax to the trial of 32 persons
charged with conspiring to foment re-
volution in India was furnished to-
day when Ram Chandra, Hindu pub-
licist and revolutionist was shot to
death in federal district court by
Ram Singh, a fellow defendant. While'
Singh still presed the trigger of his
pistol he was shot and killed by
United States Marshal Hollohan who
fired across the room.
The case went to the jury tonight.
Belief that Ram Chandra had di-
verted to his oven use proceeds from
property which Ram Singh had turn-
ed over for use in the proposed revo-
lution is said by federal authorities
to have prompted the shooting.
Immediately following the shooting,
soldiers on duty in couArt blocked the
exits. The judge ordered an investi-
gation which developed the fact that
Singh obtained the revolver when he,
left the court room during a recess.!

- TO
TO REP-
WITH

ra- PLANS FOR CAMPUS
he ELECTION COMPLETE
a-
)o Final arrangements for the All-
campus election day on May 3, were
)e- made at the meeting of the Student
ci- council last night. The council chose
on C. T. VanDeusen, '19E, and Paul E.
rs Cholette, '20L, as its nominees for
sts councilmen from the campus at large.
as The Union and the Y. M. C. A. will
each nominate two more men and
ad from these six, three will be elected to
it, the council by the students. Council-
he men have been appointed to see that
in the Homoeopathic Medical school and
i'b- the present sophomore and junior
ng classes of each of the other schools
st- nominate men to represent them on
of the council next year. They will all
ni- be voted for on the 'general campus
he election day.

AUTO MEN MEETING TO
CURTIL MANUFACTURE
MAKING OF PASSENGER CARS MAY
BE CUT TO 75 PER CENT OF
PRE SENT VOLUME
Washington, April 23. - Leading
automobile manufacturers of the
country met today with officials of the
fuel administration and war indus-
tries board to agree upon a volun-
tary curtailment of passenger auto-
mobile manufacture which probably
will total 75 percent after July 1.
There already is a 30 percent cur-
tailment order in effect.
Final action was not taken owing
to the failure of several manufactur-
ers to reach the city in time for the
meeting.
While no official statement as to the
precentage of curtailment to be agreed
upon has been made, it was said that
the manufacturers have recognized
the fact that drastic restriction of the
output of passenger cars would be
necessary, owing to the shortage of
chrome and manganese 'steel.
The policy of the government' will
be to convert to war work the facilities
of plants freed by the curtailment
order.
SHERMAN CRITICIZES
WILSON AND CABINET
Washington, April 23.-An attack
upon President Wilson and some of
the members of his official family by
Senator Sherman, of Illinois, marked
the last day of unlimited debate in
the senate on the Overman bill which
would give the president general
powers for reorganizing government
agencies during the war.
Senator Sherman criticized Secre-
taries Baker and Wilson, Postmaster
General Burleson and declared the
President had surrounded himself
with Socialists and that he should
"scatter the bunch of economic fakers
and howling dervishes" now in office,
Senator Ramsdell, of Louisiana, and
Senator McKellar of Tennessee spoke
for the bill.
Senator Sherman said Secretary
Baker is "half Socialist and the other
half pacifist." The Illinois senator
also attacked the non partisan lea-
gue.
Miss Strauss to Talk In City
Miss Juliet V. Strauss, known for
her "Ideaswof a Plain Country Woman,"
which appear in the Ladies' Home
Journal, will speak in Ann Arbor for
the first time next Sunday evening
before the Wesleyan guild. Her talk
entitled "Where Mother Gets Her
,Halo," deals with questions of
especial public interest in their relation
to women and the home and the ability
of the old fashioned women to 'find
themselves' in their native element.
Local Draftsman To Go To Washington
Fred Huenstein, for several years
employed in the drafting department
of the Motor Products corporation,
has received orders under the local
selective draft board to 'reprt ,at
once to Washington. Mr. Hauenstein
has been placed in class on'e by the
local board, but he is called to Wash-
ington for special service as a drafts-
man, having been qualified as an ex-
pert. He is to leave immediately for
the capital.
German Mayo Arrested
Washington, April 23.- Frederick

Miller, the German mayor of Michigan
City, Indiana, was arrested and lock-
ed up as an enemy alien when he came
here today to discuss with federal of-
ficials the prospects for completing
his naturalization. He took out first
papers, before the United States went
to war.
Trains to Run Through Penn Tunnel
. ;Washington, April 22,-In line with
its policy of common use of terminal
facility,, the railroad administration
today ordered that beginning Sunday,
the Baltimore & Ohio trains mlust run
into Pennsylvania station at New
York through 'the Pennsylvania tun-
nel.
Negro Sheriff Killer Hanged By Mob
Lexington, Tenn., April 22.-Berry
Noyes, negro, who shot and killed
Sheriff McBride near here last Satur-
day, was hanged in the courthouse

Y TO BEGIN WORK
OFCAMP BRANCHES
War work, such as is being done by
the Y. M. C. A. brafiches in the train-
ing camps throughout the country, is
to be done by the University Y. M.
C. A. if the plans of local officials
are carried out.
Lane hall will be opened today after
having been closed for several weeks
as a result of the coal shortage, and
a room will be fitted up as a place
to hold meetings, read, and write
letters for the men coming to take the
mechanics course and such other
military courses as may be offered at
the University. Captain Durkee ex-
presed himself yesterday as being
greatly pleased with the idea and
stated that he believed these facilities
would be of great benefit to the men
in the aviation mechanics course.
Y. M. C. A. war stationery will be
furnished the men as has been re-
quested by Captain Durkee, and a re-
quest has also been made for current
numbers of magazines. Students
having recent numbers of magazines
which they are throught reading are
requested to leave them at Lane hall
where they will be placed in the hands
of the men.
The- re-opening of Lane hall is lar-
gely due to the generosity of a friend
of the Y. M. C. A. who recently do-
nated enought coal to supply the
building as long as heat will be, need-
ed Y. M. C. A. offices which have
been located in the different build-
ings on the campus were moved back
yesterday.

SALES

*
* HOW
* Y esters
* scril
* Yester
* acrir

11

total

LIT

U CAS

CERCLE FRANCAIS

CONTINUES

igust, '19, is the Uni-
entative in this con-
iet of his oration has
as "Thanks to The
y K. Immel, who is
for the contest, said
r contestant is work-
y. He is in good phy-
.nd making rapid pro-
speech. His throat,
e operation, is greatly

ary society, the
ng society' at the
tioned the board
n that body. An
ratorical associa-
iving this organ-
and representa-
a at the next ger
association to be

T. Hollister, of the ora-
nt, announced that the
ociation play, "The Sil-
John Galesworthy, will
May 24. Preliminary
extemporaneous speak-
be held in Ann Arbor
ture have also been di-

Freshmen Not to Wear Insignia
C. A. Hart, '18E, president of the
council, announced that Lieut. G. C.
Mullen has notified him of a com-
munication from the war department
stating that freshmen in the R. 0. T.
C. will not be allowed to wear any
distinguishing insignia.
Deciding that seniors of the R. 0. T.
C. would probabiy not be allowed to
wear their gowns over their uniforms
designated Wednesday and Friday
mornings from Swing-out day until
commencement as the time for seniors
to wear their caps and gowns. In
former years the caps and gowns have
been worn all day on Wednesdays and
Fridays.
R. S. Patterson, '18, was appointed
to arrange, if possible to have class
dues paid to the treasurer of the Un-
iversity with the tuition as the ath-
letic tax is at present.
No Substitute for Contest
No substitute for the pushball con-
test has yet been chosen by the com-
mittee on spring games and they an-
nounced that unless suggestions were
given by the freshman and sophomore
classes the matter would be allowed
to stand. The pushball contest was
borbidden by the faculty last fall, and
the ball which has been at Camp Cus-
ter since last fall is worn out. A new
ball would cost about $350. The tug-
of-war and the relay races will be
held as usual in addition to the cane
spree which was omitted last fall.
Final arrangements were left in the
hands of the committee and will be
announced later.
The committee, appointed at the last
meeting, to arrange for literary class
assemblies, similar to those held in
the engineering college, reported that
some members of the faculty had been
approached but they had as yet done
nothing definite.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

POLICY OF SELECTING NEW
PLAYERS
Official announcement of the casts
for "Le Retour Imprevu" and "L'Av-
ocat Patelin," the two plays to be
presented by the Cercle Francais at
8 o'clock tomorrow night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall, has just been
made.
Reguard's "Le Retour Imprevu"
will be produced by the following
players: Alfred W. Wilson, '21, as
Geronte; Hazel S. Selby, '18, as
Madame Bertrand; Lawrence H. Selt-
zer, '20, as Merin; Malcolm E. Mc-
Gowan, '21, as Clitandre; Ashley
Hatch; '20, as the Marquis; Marjorie
C. Springer, '20, as Lisette; Dorothy
D. Williams, '20, as Lucile; Hans P.
Andreasen, '20, as Monsiuer Andre;
and Howard S. Vellenran, School of
Music, as Jaquinet.
Ludwig F. Kuijala, '19, plays the
role of Monsieur Patelin in "L'Av-
ocat Patelin," and will be supported
by Dorothy W. Gruss, '19, as Madam
Patelin, Alciba J. Himmelhock, '20,
as Monsieur Guilaume, Juan A. Bon-
net, '20E, as Agnelet, and Ed-
ward F. Moore, '21E, as Valere.
Of the members of the two casts
but two have had previous experience
in University dramatics, L. F. Kuijala
and Dorothy Gruss having taken part.
in last year's Cercle Francais pro-
duction.
The Cercle Francais this year con-
tinues the policy followed in past
years picking ,out undeveloped talent
rather than selecting that which is
ready made. As year after year new
stars have been created through the
Cercle Francais plays, this principle
has been confirmed, and today the
campus owes the French club much
for the first discovery of dramatic tal-
ent in Waldo Fellows, '14, Walter R.
Atlas, '18, and Gilbert R. Byrne, '19.
PROF. WATERMAN TO LECTURE
ON HOLY LANDS AND THE WAR
"Jerusalem, Mesopotamia, and the
War," is the topic of an illustrated
lecture to be given by Prof. Leroy
Waterman at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
the Natural Science auditorium.
This is the fourth of a series of war
lectures to be given - by University
professors under the auspices of the
Michigan Union. Professor Water-
man will give a brief sketch of the
most signiflicant things that come up
for discussion, historically. He will

The faculty
than the asc
pus, with a
credit.
Tfts Le

amount
men.!
raised
various

Men

college, $5
Soplho m
Similar
subscripti
es, showi

of the
William
nartmenl

Paris Homes Damaged in Raids
is, April 23. - Official figures
that the number of houses in
damaged by German aerial bom-
ients is one in 1,000. The in-
ce companies give 10,000 francs
mnce for a premium of twenty
s, or at the proportion of 500 to
mur Levasseur, deputy for one
eine arrondissenents, has served
upon the government that he
olate it as to the measures
. it intends to take to prevent
opulation of Paris and suburbs
becoming the prey of insur-
companies. "It is a' scandalous
ion," said Mr. Levasst ur. There
k of fifty millions taken in dur-
he past eight days. One broker
realized sixty thousand francs in

The committee :
that a greater inte
by the students.
the colleges that h
to the call for fui
days of the camp
effort totincrease
The city's subsci
uing to increase.
honor flag thatv
Ann Arbor for rea
be unfurled at no
* * * * * *

w

*
*
*
*
*

Junior engineers are requested
to come to assembly Thursday
prepared to pay their dues. It is
necessary that a large payment
on the second Liberty Loan sub-
scription be met at once.

*
*
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*
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*x
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April

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