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April 23, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGHT'
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 1918.

PRICE ITHRE

...,--

CLAIMS
HOLIDAY'

L-

MEN LEAVING FOR'
FARMST TKEEXAMS

,..,----

THINING CAMP TO
TAKE 40 STUDENTS

AMERICANS
200 IN HUN

LOSE
ATTACK

to

n, April 22.-All gover-
sked today by Secretary
eclare next Friday a state
as President Wilson has
it a national holiday to
rty Day celebrations.
a's offerings of Libertyt
sed $1,500,000,000 today.
s and Minneapolis federal

district managers sent word
y had exceeded their subscrip-

Secretary McAdoo in his telegram to
the governors asked that April 26 be
observed as a holiday throughout the
country and that "the people of each
state 'in the Union stimulate the sale
of Liberty bonds."
Secretary McAdoo asked the co-
operation of the governors, and re-
quested that by proclamation they de-
signate April 26 as Liberty Day, and
that the various governing authori-
ties "'make it a point to co-operate
in their several localities to celebrate
Liberty Day."
Official reports tonight gave the
total'of loan subscriptions as $1,490,-
555,550.
Subscriptions by districts included
Chicago with $240,257,450.1
MEDICS PRA
ORDERTOM AK U
GALENS AND CLASS PRESIDENTS
RESENT RECENT DECIS-
ION

um semt U Protests against the recent govern-I
r a resump-1
tn offensive. ment order received by President
on the Am- Harry B, Hutchins compelling all
prey Satur- medical students enrolled in the R. 0.
hting of ex- T. C. to make up all back drills and
the front. to continue the work, were voiced by-
)ming week Galens, upperclass medical honorary
rning move- society, at a special meeting called
One prob- Sunday afternoon to resolve'some sort
obecq; and of action on this matter. A commun-
levelop near ication from the society is published'
elsewhere in today's Daily, .
Lens Senior President State Opinion
movements Robert W. Watson, '18M, president
allied lines. of the senior medical class, "If Lieu-
pted two at- tenant Mullen's orders in regard to
s, but they medical students enrolled in the R. O.
T. C. are parried out, it will result in
were to be a decided impairment to their pro-
s at Robecq fessional efficiency, and be contrary
ight be forc- to the express wishes of the surgeon-
S. general,"
Lys, south- Junior President Favors Galens Move
>rthern bat- Carl E. Roser, '19M, president of the
t been any jjunior medical class, says: "The M.
E. R. C. mezi of the junior medical
has been an class who signed up in the R. 0. T. C.
s. did so on the assurance from Lieuten-
ant Mullen that back work need not
AN F01$ be made up, and that the course could
AND SINGS be dropped in case drill hours inter-
fered too seriously with classes and
ting of the laboratory work. I heartily endorse
indy after- the sentiments of the Galens as ex-
on, final ar- pressed in their communication to The
on, inalar-Daily."
maefor seniorDal"
ade. Philip J R. Darnall Issues Statement j
. Philip Joseph R. Darnall, '18M, secretary1
rman of the of the Board in Control of Student
lans for the Publications, says: "Although I am
iall. strongly in favor of compulsory mil-
re represen- itary training for all students, I do
not believe it will prove a benefit if
d to the ef- students are encouraged to enroll in
committees the course by false promises. A stu-
re Individual dent's patriotic motives should be re-
irest In the spected, and narrow-minded prejudice
the attend- should not interfere with a correct
ings will be interpretation of conditions."
;h the band Lieut. G. C. Mullen refused to issue'
Ls years. any statement last night in regard to
ad from drill the objections of the medical students
to taking up their R. 0. T. C. work
again.

Question of Credit for Students to Be
Considered Individually By
Faculty Committee
INSTRUCTORS EMPOWERED
TO GIVE NECESSARY EXAMS
Resolution Concerning Credit Includ-
es All Men Enlisting for
Military Service
Cases of men who want to leave the
University and go to work on .farms,
this spring will be considered individ-
ually by a special faculty committee
consisting of Prof. H. A. Sanders,
Prof. S. L. Bigelow, and Dean Jbhn
R. Effinger. This was decided at thej
faculty meeting held last night in the
office of Registrar A. G. Hall. Appli-;
cation should be made to Dean Ef-
finger.
To Give Credit Upon Examination
One resolution concerning credit
given to men who leave -was adopted
to apply to all cases, including men
who go on farms, into officers' train-
ing camps, or any other form of mil-
itary service. It states that "equitable
credit will be given after such exam-
inations as instructors care to give."
This means that the instructor may
require a written or oral examina-
tion, or make any other arrangements
he thinks necessary, depending on the
standing of the student in the course,
and issue the amount of credit he
thinks the student deserves.
Think Need for Farm Help Small
It is not thought that there is as
great need for college students on
farms this spring as last, since the
government has not issued a call, or
made any requests from the univer-
sities. Men are being released from
military service to asist in such
work.
J. PEARLSTEEN, '0, ENLISTS
IN JEWISH FOREIGN LEGION
Jocab Pearlsteemt, '20, of Detroit,
has enlisted in the Jewish foreign
legion, the first uni'versity student
from the middle west to enter this
body of fighters,
The Jewish foreign legion has al-
ready sent over approximately $1,500
Zionists from this country who are not
connected wi the American army, but
who are enlisted under the English
banners, and are fighting with them
on the Mesopotanian front, and parti-
cularly around Palestine.
Forty young men from Detroit
have volunteered their services to
this legion. Pearlsteen is leaving for-
duty within a week. He is the presi-
dent of therJewish Students society
in Ann Arbor, and an excellent
scholar at the University.
An entertainment was given him last
night by friends in Ann Arbor In hon-
or of his departure.
MEDICAL SCHOOL CAPACITY
STATED TO BE 380 STUDENTS
Three hundred and eighty medical
students is the total capacity the col-'
lege can handle, according to a state-
ment sent to the surgeon-general at
Washington after his inquiry as to
the total capacity of the University
Medical college.
The request probably arose from
the fact that a number of the Univer-
sities will not have medical schools
next fall, due to the absence of stu-
dents and faculty teachers. The war
department, realizing the fact that a

readjustment of students may become
necessary, is planning on assisting in
such a change of schools, in finding
out what schools are to remain open,
and the limit of their capacity.
One hundred and twenty freshmen,
100 sophomores, 85 juniors, and 75
seniors is the total capacity of the
Medical college, according to the
secretary of the school.
Student League to Meet Thursday
The Students' league of the Bethle-
hem church will hold their regular
monthly meeting at 7:15 o'clock
Thursdgky night, in the parlors of the
church. All evangelical students are
invited to attend.

Lient G.
tions

C. Mullen Received Instrue-
Regarding Requirements
For Officers Camp

REQUISITES FIXED TO GOVERN
ELIGIBILITY OF CANDIDATES
Must Be At Least 20 Years and 9
Months, and Not Over 32
Years of Age
Michigan's quota to the fourth
officers' training camp will be 40 men.
Preliminary instructions regarding
candidates for the fourth officers'
training school were received by
Lieut. George C. Mullen yesterday
from the war department. The fol-
lowing statement was issued by Lieut-
enant Mullen:
"Owing to the short space of time
before the training schools are start-
ed, and in order that all who desire
to enter may receive consideration,
it has been found necessary to leave
the selection of these men entirely
in the hands of the officials of the
institutions themselves, and in view of
the fact that these institutions will
begin receiving applications at once,
this advance information is submitted
for your guidance regarding the selec-
tion of men to attend the training
schools. Additional instructions, to-
gether with a memorandum of infor-
mation,, will be furnished at the ear-
liest practicable date.
"Graduates (unless further instruc-
tions are received I will consider un-
derggades as well as graduates) who
are within the draft age and who have
had at least one year of military in-
struction at an educational institu-
tion under the supervision of an of-
ficer of the army while attending
same, in number not to exceed 40
men.'
.. Camp Requirements
"The folowing requirements will
govern their eligibility:
"They must be on May 15, 1918 not
less than 20 years and 9 months, and
not over 32 years of age. They must
be citizens of the United States.
They must have the physical qualifi-
cations prescribed by regulations for
an officers' reserve.
"The men selected will be required,
before they are admitted to the train-
ing school, to enlist for the duration
of the war, and if after completing the
prescpbed course, they are not re-
commended for a commission, or if
during the course, are found not qua-
lified to continue same, will be sent to
appropriate organizations for duty
as enlisted men.
Probable Rating
"If they successfully complete the
course and are found qualified, they
will be listed as eligible for appoint-
ments as second lieutenants, and will
be commissioned as vacancies may oc-
cur, provided their service between
the date when they become eligible
and the date of occurrence of vacan-
cy is s.atisfactory. While in attend-
anc at the training school, they will
receive the pay and allowances of pri-
vates, first-class, and will receive
transportation, or at the option of the
government, milage at the rate of
three and one-half cents per mile
from their colleges, schools, or homes
to such camp as they may be directed
to attend.
Take Physical Examinations
Men will, on arrival at the training
camp, be physic<lly examined and
enlisted or inducted into 'the service
as privates, and such as may be found
physically disqualified by the medical
officer who examined them for enlist-
lent, will be rejected and not allowed to
oemplete their enlistment, and will re-
turn to their homes at their own ex-
pense. Upon completion of enlist-
ment and entrance to training school
they all will be appointed privates,
first-class, and receive the pay and

allowances of that grade.
"The selection of all the men will
(Continued on Page Six)
Britisbt Arnly.Ian Gains High Position
Washipgton, April 22.-Lieutenant-
General Bridges of the British army,
who recently arrived in Washington,
has been made principal military ad-
visor of the British ambassador, and
high commissioner and head of all
the British missions in the United
States.

Washington, April 22.-General
Pershing's first report on the German
assault upon the Americans and
French forces in the Toul sector Sat-
urday is understood to indicate that
the Americans sustained more than
200 casualties. It estimates that the
German losses are between 300 and
400.
It was learned tonight that the re-
port had been received, but the war
department refused to make it pub-
lic, or to comment upon persistent
reports about the department's con-
cerning its contents. Secretary. Baker
is understood to be awaiting more
details before making an announce-
ment,thoughhe probably will lay
the information received before a
house military committee, when he
appears tomorrow, to tell of his trip
abroad.
Washington, April 22. Though
without any official information to
confirm press repots of ill treatment
of American prisoners of war in Ger-
many, the state department has in-
stituted an inquiry to develop the
fact. If they conform to the publish-
ed accounts, protest will be made
promptly through the Spanish gov-
ernment which has taken over Ameri-
can diplomatic representation at Ber-
lin.
CERCLE FRAIN CAIS PLAY
OFFERS EXELLENTICLT
"L'AVOCAT PATELIN" CONCEDED
TO BE BEST OF EARLY
FORCES

Faculty
In,

Subscriptions St
With Total Rea
$124,000 Mark

*

* * * * * * * * * *

* CAMPUS DRIVE FIGURES

*
*
*
*
*
*
1*

Yesterday's faculty sub-
scriptions...........$2,
Yesterday's student sub
scriptions ................$3
Faculty total .........$124
Student total ...........$19
Campus total.........$143
Amount needed to reach
campus goal ............$56
Amount students must
raise to get honor flag ..$25
* * * * * * * * * *

Have you ever been in need of a
suit of clothes whose purchase your
pecuniary condition forbade?
That was the situation in which the
hero of "L'Avocat Patelin," the sec-
ond of two plays to be presented by
the Cercle Francais on Thursday night
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall found
himself. The means used by this
scheming man of the -legal profession
to solve his delimma offer excellent
suggestions to a struggling humanity.
Story Features Lawyer In Rags
The story itself has to do with the
fortunes of a lawyer in rags who
'believes in the efficacy of cloths as
client getters. Through his trickery
he obtains the clothes, then spends
the time during the remainder of the
play evading payment for the same.
He becomes involved in the fortunes
of the sly shepherd of the cloth mer-
chant, who is likewise engaged in try-
ing to cheat his master. The com-
bined force of the two knaves is too
much for the old clothier, and in the
final scene he accordingly submits
with ill grace to the loss of his cloth
and sheep.
Play Written About 1470
"L'Avocat Patelin" was written
about 1470, its original author being
unknown. By many critics it is con-
ceded to be the best of the .early
farces which have come down to us,'
its popularity in former times being
amply attested by allusions to it, and
versions of it, in Latin which were
acted by students.
In 1881 the play was made into
five -acts, written entirely in verse,
but the version to be used by the
Cercle Francais antedates this one,
being the production as remodelled
and modernized in 1706 by Brueys and
Palaprat. The only divergence from
this version on Thursday night is the
suppression of a love intrigue in the
taste of the times, which is 'an ad-
dition of Brueys.'
Married Couple Given Reception
In honor of the marriage of Miss
Bertha Looker, nurse at the Univer-
sity health service, to LaVerne H.
Andrews, '18D, a reception was held
Sunday night at the home of the bride
1336 Wilmot street.
Germans Take Rabbit Census
Berne, April 20.-A census of all
the tame rabbits in the German Em-
pire was taken by order of the author-
ities on March 1, owing to the in-
creasing importance of rabbit skins
for army requirements,
Ordnance Men Leave for Augusta, Ga.
Ordnance men, numbering 139, the
sixth and last class to graduate from
the University army stores course,
left yesterday for Augusta, Ga.

STUDENTS MUS
GET HONORI
S I 0 U LD SUBSCRIBE
MORE TO WIN THR
BARRED EMBLEM
CAMPUS CONTINUE
SATURDAY'S 5

The campus continued to slue
the third Liberty Loan drive,
only $3,800 credited to the sub
tions of the students yesterday.
War Preparedness board of Wa
naw county once more empha
the fact that no honor flag wom
given the University unless the
dents raised their minimum quo
$45,000.
Faculty Continuing to Subser
Faculty subscriptions are con
ing to pour in. Owing to the e
of that body, the campus tota
swelled to $143,550, with $56,450
needed to reach the goal that has
set for the University. Membe
the campus committee ore coi
that the goal will be reached, t
mainly to the faculty. They
however, that the students mu
their share and raise the comps
vely small amount that has been
of them.
Canvassers Must Report Prom
The students must raise $
more within the next 12 days
three-barred honor flag is to fly
the flag pale. The team membe
the men's committee have been
in turning in reports of sales, an
campus committee was the
forced to refrain from publishin
standings of the different teams.
phasis was made that reports
be in promptly, and that the wo
for the loan should make returi
mediately after the selling
bonds.
The women raised an addi
$1,000 yesterday, moking a total
000 raised by the Motarboard
Wyvern teams. The Motarboar
ciety still leads the opposing
with $2,650 to its credit, makin
Wyvern sales $1,350.
ALPHA NU DEFEATS ADELP
IX ANNUA L FRESHMAN DE
Alpha Nu defeated Adelphi ho
representatives last night in the
annual freshman debate between
two societies by a vote of two t
The question was: "Resolved,
the United States should use i
fluence for the establishment
league to enforce peace," the
Nu supporting the negative side
argument.
The members- of the winning
are: Wade F. Connell, '21, Bri
Garland, '21, and Earl Miles,
Simon Shetzer, '21, the third sp
for the affirmative, was the indi
star of the debate.
Mr. George D. Wilner of the o
department, Mr. James H. Rust
the political science departmen
Mr. Ray V. Leffler of the econo
department, acted as judges c
contest.

'0 GIVE
LECTURE
n, of the

DR. S. TAYLOR TO ILLUSTRATE
PALESTINE VIEWS IN LECTURE

trio- Dr.S. Earl Taylor, secretary of the
Wed- Methodist 1loreign Missions, and a
.ence member of the Royal Photographic
his Society, will give two illustrated lec-
and tures in Lane hall, on Thursday and
Friday evenings, April 25 and 26, at
with 7:30 o'clock.
Dr. Taylor has been, around the
le a world twice and has taken some un-
bject, usual photographs of Jerusalem, Mt.
cture Sinai and the ruined city of Petra.
been The lectures will be different each
the evening and the public is invited to

400,000 TONS 0
VESSELS (
Washington,
ping board has

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