100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 16, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BUY THAT LIBERTY BOND NOW!

THE WEATHER
PARTLY CLOUD'Y
COOLER TODAY

c~r Siar1

144or
4) att

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXVIII. No. 13.

ANN A BOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1917.

PRICE THREE CENTS

w'

HUN FORCES HOULD
CAPITAL OFOESEL,
RUS~SIANSFLEEIN6
SLAV NAVAL UNITS AND LAND
BATTERIES ARE RESISTING
GERMAN FLEET
TEUTON MEN 'O WAR
SHELL COASTAL TOWNSI
Big Guns' Bombardment in Flanders!
Presages Another Infantry
Offensive
(By Associated Press.)
German forces which landed on the
Island of Oesel at the head of the
Gulf of Riga have captured Arenburg,
capital of the island, and are still
pursuing the Russians at various
places.
Aiding the operation as far as pos-
sible, are German cruisers and tor-
pedo boats who have shelled coast
batteries and towns. Attempts by the
German fleet, to enter the Gulf of Riga
or to operate in the waters between
Oesel and Dago Islands are, however,
meeting with resistance respectively
from the Russian land batteries and
Russian naval units.
As yet no attempts have been made
by the Germans to effect a landing on
the coast of Estionia and harass the
right flank of the Russian army. Neith-
er have any efforts been made to
penetrate the Gulf of Finland.
In Flanders no military operations
on a large scale have been attempted,
but big guns are carrying out
reciprocal bombardments of great
violence like those which always pre-
cede the starting of an infantry of-
fensive.
The British troops have carried out
several successful raids in which
severe causalties were inflicted on the
Germans, prisoners and machine guns
being taken.
After the lapse of two days the
heavy -artillery duels have been re-
sumed between the French and the
Germans on the Verdun front, espe-
cially to the north of the famous Hill
No. $44.'On the Aisne front, there is
considerable artillery activity.
DRAFT DECISIONS
ANNOUNCED SOON

STUDENT CARELESSNESS
RESPONSIBLE FOR FIRES
CIGARETTE STUBS TO BLAME FOR
ANNUAL LOSS TO FORESTRY
FARM PLANTINGS
"Unless University of Michigan stu-
dents as well as outsiders are more
careful in their disposal of cigarette
stubs and lighted matches, damage to
the extent of hundreds of dollars will
be the inevitable result to the Uni-
versity forestry farm, the tree nurs-
uries about the city and the plantings
along the Huron river," was the state-
ment made today by Instructor H. L.
Young of the department of forestry.
"Every spring and fall we have this
problem to contend with, more so in
the latter season. The sod and weed
cover drives out to the extent that it
is quite inflammable. A carelessly
dropped match, unless , extinguished,
will kindle this growth and unless
the flame is immediately put out, a
miniature forest fire that will kill all
the young trees in its path will be the
result. The plantings cost the Uni-
versity a comparatively large amount
per acre and are invaluable from an
educational standpoint. I hope that
the student body of the University will
co-operate with the forestry depart-
ment in preserving the fine nursuries
we have already established." -
During the past five years four fires
have been the result of carelessness.
Fortunately every one was stamped
out before a great deal of damage was
inflicted, but this was due to some-
one being on the scene at the time.
(Continued on Page Six)

ALUMNI IN FRA' NCE
FORM ASSOCgIATION
President H. B. Hutchins Authorizes
Michigan Men in Service
to Organize
W. A. P. JOHN, '16 SENDS LETTER
TO DEAN JOHN R. EFFINGER
Tells of Michigan Banquet Somewhere
in France; Sing Songs and
Cheer Alma Mater
Michigan is to have alumni associa-
tions abroad. At the request of Michi-
gan alumni serving their country in
France, the following authorization
was issued by President H. B. Hutch-
ins:
To Michigan Boys Somewhere in

France:
It has come to me that there
is an earnest desire among our
boys who are serving their
country abroad in the present
crisis to form alumni associa-
tions. It has been suggested
that authority so to do be sent
by the University. It gives me
great pleasure, in the name of
the University, to authorize such
associations and to express the
hope that the movement will
meet with abundant success.
Our hearts are with you in this
movement and in the glorious
service that you are rendering.
God bless you and keep you.
In the name and under the
seal of the University of Michi-
gan.
H. B. HUTCHINS,
President.

MILITARY TRAINING WORK
STARTED IN EARNEST
LECTURES TO BE GIVEN EVERY
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON;
DRILLS ANNOUNCED
Active work for the 1,600 military
students enrolled in Lieut. George C.
Mullen's course began yesterday aft-
ernoon in Waterman gymnasium.
Classes were excused from drill yes-
terday on account of a preliminary
lecture by Lieutenant Mullen, who in-
structed the men on military science
and tactics.
Lectures will be given every Wed-
nesday afternoon. Drill periods will
be held as announced In the program.
Clip the following athletic exercise
program for reference:
Regiment No. 1-Tuesday, 4:30 to 5
o'clock; Co. A, digging and hand
wrestling; Co. B, standing broad
jump; Co. C, standing hop, step and
jump; Co. D, 50-yard dash; Co. E,
shot put; Co. F, relaxed running. 5
to 5:30 o'clock-Co. G, digging and
hand wrestling; Co. H, standing broad
jump; Co. I, standing hop-step and
jump; Co. K, 50-yard dash; Co. L, shot
put; Co. M, relaxed running. Thurs-
day, 4 to 5:30 o'clock, setting up ex-
ercises. Friday, 5 to 5:30 o'clock-
Co. A, shot put; Co. B, standing broad
jump; Co. C, standing hop, step and
jump; Co. D, 50-yard dash; Co. E, shot
put; Co. F, relaxed running. 4:30 to
5' o'clock-Co. G, shot pt; Co. H,
standing broad jump; Co. I, standing
hop, step and jump; Co. K, 50-yard
dash; Co. L, digging and hand wrest-
ling; Co. M, relaxed running..
Regim~ient No. 2-Tuesday and Fri-
day, 4 to 5:30 o'clock-Setting up ex-
ercises. Thursday, 5 to 5:30 o'clock-
Co. A, shot put; Co. B, standing broad
jump; Co. C, standing hop, step and
jump; Co. D, 50-yard dash; Co. E, dig-
ging and hand wrestling; Co. F, re-
laxed running. 4:30 to 5 o'clock-Co.
G, standing broad jump; Co. H, stand-
ing hop, step, and jump; Co. I, 50-
yard dash;sCo. K, shot put; Co. L, re-
laxed running; Co. M, hand and leg
wrestling.
Cadets of the reserve officers' train-
ing corps of the University form in.
regular order at 4 o'clock sharp every
drill period. The cadets of the Sec-
ond regiment line up between the car
tracks and the University sidewalk
opposite the left doors of Hill auditor-
ium that are nearest State street.
The first line from left toright con-
tains Companies I, E and A; the sec-
ond, Companies K, F, and B; the third,
Companies L, G, and C, and the fourth,
Companies M, H, and D.
Companies of the First regiment oc-
cupy the space opposite the two right
doors of the auditorium, in the same
formation. Any irregularities or omis-
sion of drill periods will be announced
several days beforehand.
FORTY-FIVE YEARLINGS PASS
FROSH GLEE CLUB TRY-OUTS
To Meet Wednesday Evening in School
of, Music for Organization
and Practice

DENTAL STUDENTS
IN DRAFT EXEMPT
Recent Government Rulings Permit
All Men with One Year's Work
to Complete Courses
All dental students, past their fresh-
man year in a well recognized school,
can claim exemption from draft until
they have completed their courses, ac-
cording to recent government rulings.
At graduation, however, they must en-
list in the dental reserve corps.
Men who have already been drafted
into the national army by local boards,
can upon application be permitted to
return to their schools and complete
their courses.
Much warm discussion has centered
about the question "Should, men
trained in dentistry, and in medicine
be compelled to enter the army as a
private on equal rank with the un-
trained,?"
Dental students who have been
called to service by their local boards
and desire to finish their courses and
then enlist in the dental reserve corps
should follow these regulations: "With
such a request the student must en-
close copy of order of local board
calling him to report for physical
examination with form 103, affidavit
evidence of the status of the applicant
as a-"dental student by his dean, and
statement that he desires to enlist in
the reserve corps of the medical de-
partment.
"Dental students in camp should
proceed as above, except that they
need not furnish form 103. Address1
request to Surgeon-General, Washing-
ton, D. C."
DIVER COAL SHIPMENTS
TO EASE PRESENT NEED,

Have Not Yet Revealed
Changes in Method of
4aflt -Nm

Possible
Ex-

aningm en
Washington, Oct. 15. - Secretary
Baker indicated today that a decision
as to the examination and classifica-
tion of all remaining men registered
under the draft law might be reached
within a few days.
Congress eliminated from the urgent
deficiency bill an appropriation for
this work, qnd it has been assumed
that the project could not be carried
out at least until money was forth-
coming at the next session in De-
cember.
Mr. Baker also is considering a pro-
posed change in the process of ex-
amining the men which has been rec-
ommended to him, the details of
which, however, have not been dis-
closed.
DB. ELOISE WALKER NEW
HEALTH SERVICE HEADT
Dr. Eloise Walker, who was ap-
pointed to succeed Dr. Elsie Pratt as
women's physician of the health ser-
vice, arrived in Ann Arbor Sunday.
Dr. Walker is a Michigan graduate.
She was a member of the literary col-
lege of '93 and the medical class of
'96. She expected to arrive here soon-
er, but was detained by her work at
the Binghamton State hospital, New
York.
While the examinations which were
required of those taking regular gym-
nasium work; were being given, Dr.
Lucy Boland was assisted by Dr.
Marjorie Burnham from Kinsman,
Ohio.

TO INVADECONFERENCE
UNIVERSITY WILL BE WELL REP-
RESENTED IN MEETING FOR
WAR SERVICE
Delegates from every Young Men's
and Women's Christian association in
the state will be present at a war
service conference to be held at Bat-
tle Creek Friday.
Michigan will send a large repre-
sentation of men and women. Plans
are to be made at the session, to de-
termine what can be done by the
state associations to co-operate with
the national organization in army Y.
M. C. A. work. A visit to Camp Cus-
ter will follow the business session so
that the delegates may have the op-
portunity to see a practical demon-
stration of association work.
Registrar A. G. Hall, M. P. Doty,
'18E, and N. C. Fetter, superintendent
of the Students' Christian association,
will head the men's section from the
University.
The delegation will also include a
number of representative faculty
-women and college girls.
The list follows: Mrs. H. B. Hutch-
ins, Mrs. W. R. Humphreys, Mrs. C.
0. Davis, Mrs. J. E. Beal, Mrs. W. B.
Pillsbury, and Mrs. Lloyd Douglas;
Marguerite Chapin, '20, Ruth Connelly,
'20, Hazel Hoffman, '19, Pauline Cham-
plin, '18, Hazel Beckwith, '19, Emily
Loman, '19, Helen Bourke, '18, Jessie'
Saunders, '18, Virginia Cavendish, '18,
Anna Lloyd, '18, Edith Duemling, '19,
Pansy Blake, '18, Ruth Fly, '19, Jean-
nette Armstrong, '17, Lucile Duff, '20,
Freda Seigworth, Marion Stowe, and
Miss Eva Lemert.
This convention is a preliminary to
the November campaign to raise $35,-
000,000 for war service. Of this amount
$1,000,000 is to be raised in the col-
leges and universities of the United
States. The convention for this pur-
pose in the central states was held in
Chicago about two weeks ago. The
purpose of this international move-
ment for war service, which is non-
sectarian in character, is to direct the
social and recreational activities of
the various camps and cantonments.
A special train leaving Ann Arbor
at 6:50 o'clock Friday morning will
convey Michigan representatives. John
R. Mott, international Y. M. C. A. sec-
retary, will be the principal speaker.
Mr. Mott has but recently returned
from Russia, as a member of the Root
peace commission.

Dean John R. Effinger received the
request in a letter from W. A. P.
John, '16, who, somewhere in France,
has come into contact with many
Michigan alumni, who all expressed
the desire for an authorized associa-
tion. In the letter Wap tells of a
banquet, in one of the restaurants in
the city where they were staying, at
which 34 Michigan men were present.
Michigan songs were sung, and the
house fairly rang with cheers for the
alma mater. The banquet was such
a success that it was resolved that
another should be held in the near
future, at which about 15 more Michi-
gan men are expected.

MAIL SAMMIES'
GIFTS AT

h

AMPLE
AT

SUPPLY FOR EVERYONE
GOVERNMENT PRICES,

ONCE

Soldier Boys Will Not Get Presents
Unless Sent Before
November 15
If you are intending to send a
Christmas package to a boy in the
trenches,'you will have to do your
Christmas shopping early. Postmas-
ter-General Burleson has notified the
local office that the department is pre-
pared to insure delivery before Christ-
mas of any package sent to a soldier
in France, providing it is mailed by
November 15.
The way that the public can assure
the boys in France a happy Christmas
is by mailing early, packing securely
and addressing properly. Special care
must be taken to have all articles
bound so that they won't work loose
despite the six weeks shipping and
storage. It is safest to use only wood-
en boxes as they will be subject to
much piling and handling.
Packages must be marked "Christ-
mas Mail," but must have no Red
Cross or other than postage stamps
stuck on.
Any perishable goods should be sent
by other means than parcel post.
Frosh to Hold Mass Meeting Tonight
Freshmen of the University will
hold a mass meeting in University hall
this evening at 7 o'clock. Dean John
R. Effinger of the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts, will be
in charge of the meeting. S. S. At-
wood, '18E, president of the Student
council, will also be present and ad-
dress the meeting. Every member of
the class of '21 is urged to be present
at this meeting.

Forty-five men have been success-
ful in passing the tryouts for the
freshman Glee club.
These men will meet at 7 o'clock
Wednesday evening at the School of
Music for the organization of the club,
election of officers, and the first prac-
tice. They are asked to be prompt and
to bring a copy of the new Michigan
song book.
Following is the list of names of
those who will be expected:
First tenors: Carleton Finkbeiner,
N. A. Gleason, Leon E. Grubaugh, F.
W. Miller, L. L. Shippy, and F. L.
Warfel.
Second tenors: E. H. Bassett, C. N.
Fletcher, K. Horiuchi, F. B. Keogh, J.
L. Kobacher, H. J. Lowry, D. Chester
Maltby, D. F. McColl, M. E. McGowen,
R. L. Miller, J. L. Reed, 0. Reed, and
E. Fu Rey.
Baritones: G. Barr, D. F. Byers, M.
Carpenter, "F. T. Colby, E. R. Elzinga,
W. H. Johnstone, Boy Logan, D. H.
Moats, W. L. Nutten, F., M. Reed, P.
Risheberger, P. Des Roches, F. S. Ros-
en, B. Shirk, A. J. Underwood; E.
West, E. B. Williams, and Mark
Yeager.
Second basses: 0. Carlson, L. A.
Close, J. W. Baird, P. P. Hutchinson,
Howard B. Marshall, G. E. Mitchell,
H. Mills, R. C. Morrisey, and E. F.
Parkins,

l
I
_
i
a

SAYS GARFIELD
Washington, Oct. 15.-Arrangements
to relieve a second coal shortage in
Michigan were made by the fuel ad-
ministrator here tonight after the
situation had been presented by Gov-
ernor Sleeper and members of the
state 'coal board.
Enough coal will be diverted from
shipments now going through lake
ports to the northwest and Canada to
meet pressing needs.
The delegation wa# told the coal
would be supplied just as soon as the
coal board furnished information as
to the amount needed for immediate
requirements and the districts into
which it is to be sent. When the lake
season closes, the administration
promises all the coal necessary for
the state, ,will be available.
Communities really in need of coal
can get it at government prices, Fuel
Administrator Garfield announced to-
night, and the supply is ample to meet
immediate needs even in the middle
west where an acuate condition arose
through failure, he said, of cities to
specifically state their needs. Ap-
peals should be made to the fuel ad-
ministrators in each state, Garfield
said, but where there is no state ad-
ministrator, communications should
be directed to the fuel administrator
here.
CONSOLIDATE SHIP
YARDS FOR SPEED
Company Known as Bethlehem Steel
Corporation Is Capitalized
at $12,500,000
New York, Oct. 15.-Consolidation
of the operation of all the various
shipbuilding yards controlled by the
Bethlehem Steel corporation under a
new corporation to be known as the
Bethlehem Shipbuilding corporation,
Limited, in order to co-ordinate and
expediate work on the increased vol-
ume of government shipbuilding de-
mands, was announced here today.
The new company will be capital-
ized at $12,500,000. All the stock to
be owned by the Bethlehem Steel cor-
poration or its subsidiaries with the
exception of director's qualifying
shares. The president will be E. G.
Grace and the vice-president in charge
of sales and operations will be J. W.
Cowell.

MICHIGAN LIBERTY.
LAN CAMPAIGN
DOOMED TO FAIL?
BONDS SEEM TO HOLD LITTLE
APPEAL TO STUDENTS AS
GOOD INVESTMENT
WOMEN NOT AWAKE
TO IMPORT OF LOAN
Workers Resolve to Increase Efforts;
Tent Will Be Established
on Campus
Unless Michigan students take the
Liberty loan more seriously, the quota
will not be subscribed, officials in
charge of the. campaign believe.
Many of the minute men speaking at
the clubs, society, fraternity, and sor-
ority houses report that the students
seem interested enough, and respect-
fully listen to what the speaker has
to say, but when he is through they
try to argue with him, that the Liber-
ty loan is not a good investment.
In the opinion of those managing
the University loan drive, there is not
the enthusiasm manifested that one
would expect to find among Michigan
students.
One of the lieutenants in charge of
the women solicited to buy loans said
she believed the women were not half
awake to the importance of the loan;
nor did they know what it would
mean should the fund fal.
"One of the disconcerting things
about this campaign is that students
who volunteered to manage the cam-
paign in their individual groups have
not been appearing to make their re-
ports to Professor Parker at room
268 new Engineering building, which
he has asked of them as a personal
favor," said a manager Monday night.
"As a result of the failure of these
volunteers to appear at 4 o'clock with
their reports, we have been unable to
learn what they are doing," he contin-
ued.
A campaign tent will be pitched -on
the State street side of the campus
this week to insure having the loan
called to the attention of stragglers.
The Trigons will manage this tent.
"Every student can afford to buy
a bond," is the cry of the Liberty
workers who are working despite te
handicap of the disinterested students
reported: "We will sell these' bonds,"
said one of the stump speakers, yes-
terday, if it takes all the pep we've
got. Michigan men and women I be-
lieve have spirit, only it's dormant."
Nearly fifty representatives of the
various campus organizations who did
not attend the Friday night's banquet
for the drive at the Union, were pre-
sent at a dinner there last night.
Among the speakers of the evening
were: Prof.sI.Leo Sharfman, Prof.
John C. Parker, Mildred Mighell, '18,
and Albert Horne, '18.
"Goodbye Germany," a popular song
sung Bob Hamilton, scored its usual
success. Robert McDonald, '18, and
Norman H. Ibsen, '18E, gave a prac-
tical demonstration of how to sell
Liberty loan bonds.
Eight house% in Which University
women are living have asked for
speakers to present the Liberty loan
proposition to them, according to
Francis Bacon,'02, director .of social

affairs at the Union.
Three league houses, three sorority
houses and' the two dormitories are
represented which would include ap-
proximately one third of all the wo-
men students.
Among those listed to speak at tho
various houses are Prof. W. A. Frayer,
Prof. J. W. Scholl, 'and Prof. C. 0.
Davis.
GERMAN SOCIALISTS FAVOR
"PEACE BY UNDERSTANDING"
London, Oct. 15.-A monster dem-
onstration .in favor of "peace by un-
derstanding" marked the opening of
the German socialist conference .at
Wurzburg, Bavaria, according to a
dispatch from Copenhagen.
Phillip Scheidemann, the majority
socialist leader in' the reichstag,
speaking to the huge audience, de-
clared that all conditions of life war-
ranted the attitude the socialists were

6

DU Publication Has Woman Editor
r the first time in eight years, a
an will be editor-in-chief of The
d, a weekly publication at AV
college. Miss Audrey Wilder, a
r, will hold the position.I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan