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April 21, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-21

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T WTTH VOUR 'TR "N MIN!"

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIR
SERVICE

0

VIII. No. 140.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 1918.

PRICE THREE C

..

WOLVERINES WN
BUT TWO SCONDS
IN DRAKE EVENTS
ILLINOIS OUTSPEEDS MICHIGAN
RUNNERS IN HALF MILE
RELAY
JOHNSON DEFEATED BYa
SCHLOZ OF MISSOURI
Chicago Leads in University Class with
10 Points; Grinnell Takes Honors
in College Competition
Des Moines, Ia., April 20.-Michigan
today failed to repeat in the Drake re-
layt her victory in the Conference
meet at Northwestern. She took but
second in the two events in which she
had entries, tying for fourth place in
the carnival with Notre Dame and
Wisconsin, with three points each.
Carl Johnson, the Maize and Blue star
who won the sprint at the Conference
meet, was forced to take second to
Scholz of Missouri, in the special 100
yard dash, but to beat him he made the
Southerner travel the distance in nine
and four-fifths seconds. Illinois beat
out the Wolverine sprinters in the
half mile relay.
Chicago Wins Carnival
Chicago led the carnival in the Un-
iversity with 10 points. The maroon
runners took first place in the two
mile relay, third in the four mile,
and second in the one mile. Missouri's
total in the relays was six, with a first
in the one mile, and a fourth place
in the half. Scholz's victory in the
special dash raised their standard. In
the college class Grinnell secured two
firsts. The next best performance in
this class was that of Morningstar,
whose two mile relay team captured
that event for the fourth successive
time, and the fifth time in six years.
Cold Slows Up Events
Heavy snow and a winter chill slow-
ed up participants and no new rec-
ords were set. The snow and cold
failed to take the edge off of com-
petition and several close races de-
veloped, particularly in the 100 yard
feature dash. Johnson of Michigan,
and Scholw of Missouri, fought this
race the entire way, the latter forg-
ing ahead on the Anis4
Following is the summry:
100 yard dash feature event-Scholz,
Missouri, first; Johnson, Michigan,
second; Carroll, Illinois, third. Time,
9 4-5 seconds,
Relays, four-mile university-Ames,
first; Notre Dame, second; Chicago,
thir4. Nebraska failed to finish. Time,
19:29,
Mile college-Morningside, first;
Cornell, second; Wabash, third. Time
8:49 3-6.
Half mile university-Illinois, first;
Michigan, second; Nebraska, third.
Time, 49:3-5.
One mile universty-Mssouri, first;
Chicago, second; Iowa, third. Time-
3:39.
Many Women Sgn Up for Baseball
Prospects for Women's interclass
baseball are good, if the number sign-
ed up on the bulletin board in Bar-
bour gymnasium is any indication. A
large percentage of freshmen and
sophomores have elected baseball for
their spring sport, while juniors
have voluntarily signed up in large]

numbers. There will be a series of
interclass games which will start as
soon as the proficiency of the several
teams becomes such as to guarantee
well-played games.
Receive 9,000 Plants for War Gardens
Two thousand shrubs have been re-
ceived by the War Gardens committee,
they are of the very best quality and
have been distributed among the peo-
ple at the cost for which they were
obtained. The committee has ordered
more and expect them here soon.
These shrubs and plants are purchas-
ed at the very lowest possible cost
and the buyers are charged only
enough to cover the express.
"General Pershing," Name for Orchid
London, April 20.-The feature of
this year's exhibition of the British
Horticultural Society is a new orchid,
with mauve petals and rich purple
lips, which has been named "General

LARGE
AT R.

ATTENDANCE
0. T. C. BALL

Approximately 400 couples were in
attendance last night at the R. 0. T. C.
military ball held in the combined
gymnasiums. It was the first since
the organization of the corps on the
campus, and was probably the biggest
dance held so far this year.
Strains of the "Star Spangled Ban-
ner" opened the ball, followed by
"The Victors." It had been planned
to have President Harry B. Hutchins,
and Mrs. Hutchins, lead the grand+
march, but due to a slight illness of
Mrs, Hutchins, they were unable to
do so, and the deans of the colleges
with their wives, officiated. The first
three numbers of the program were
played by the R. 0. T. C. band, and
then a seven piece Ike Fisher orches-
tra continued the program.
Five large flags were the chief dec-
orations. Refreshments were served
during the intermissions. The deficit
incurred by the band on its North
western trip was fully met, accord-
ing to an estimate made by the com-
mittee. Prof. J. R. Brumm, who man-
aged the function, pronounced it a
decided success.
AMERICAN ESSEL BLOWS
UP IN FRENCH HRBOR
41 MEMBERS OF CREW PROBABLY
LOST IN EXPLOSION; MICHI-
GAN MAN ON BOARD
(Associated Press){
Washington, April 20.-An internal
explosion destroyed the American
steamer Florence H. in a French port
on the night of April 17, with a pro-.
bable loss of 41 members of her crew.
Vice Admiral Simms reported the
blowing up of the vessel to the navy
department today.
The Florence H. was built on the
Great Lakes for a foreign concern,
and was christened the Souk Ahras.
She was commandeered by the ship-
ping board before being completed
and taken to the coast. The vessel
carried a civilian crew of about 52
men, and a naval guard of 23 men.
She sailed from Philadelphia March
30 with a cargo of 5000 tons of pow-
der and steel.
Among the vessel's crew was one
Michigan man, Martin T. Collins of
Benton Harbor.
CERCLE FRANCAIS
PLAY BY REYNARD
Jean Francois Regnard, considered
by many as the best comic poet and
playwright after the time of Moliere,
is the author of "Le Retour Imprevu,"
one of the two plays to be presented
by the Cercle Francas next Thurs-
day night, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall
"Le Retour Imprevu," which is one
of Regnard's shorter prose plays, deals
with the unexpected return of a father
and the amusing devices employed by
his son's valet to prevent his entrance
into the home, all the furniture of
which has been sold to pay for his
son's extravagances during his ab-
sence.
Clever Dialogue
Much of the production's dramatic'
value lies in the clever handling of
dialogue. The scintillating wit of the
leading characters characterizes the
entire play. The plot is based di-
rectly on the "Mestellaria" of Plautus,
whose ability as a dramatist may be
remembered through his "Menaechim,"

presented here two years ago by the
Classical club. A
Regnard, who differs from Moliere
in that he writes according to estab-
lished dramatic traditions, in imita-
tion of that author rather than as a
founder of those precedents, does not
create character, or even types of
character. It is in the handling of
situations to produce the most comical
effects that he is an acknowledged
master.
Wrote Solely to Amuse
He neither preaches nor Moralizes,
but wrote solely to amuse, and his
purpose is accomplished admirably.
In addition to entertaining his audi-
ence, Regnard paints faithfully a pic-
ture of his time and its tendencies,
doing all in a style which has been
praised by dramatic critics.

LOAN SUBSCRIPTION
SLU.MPSYESTERDAY
Student Purchases Fall Short of Fri-
day's Figures; Women's Sales $750
Under Those of Day Previous
FACULTY DRIVE UNSLACKENED;
OVERSUBSCRIPTION MOUNTS

*

*I

Country Lagging With Less Than One-
Half Minimum Amount of Bonds
Asked Taken Up
* * * * * * * * * *-* * *

* PROGRESS OF LIBERTY
* LOAN DRIVE ON CAMPUS
* ____

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Yesterday's faculty sales.

.

.$3,300
Yesterday's student sub-
scriptions . ................ $5,250
Faculty ...............$121,150
Students total ..........$15,750
Campus total........$136;900
Campus goal ..... .$200,000
Amount needed to reach..
goal ..... ....$63,100
* * * * * * * * * * *

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Michigan students slumped in
the third day of the Liberty Loan cam-
paign on the campus. Only $5,250 was]
subscribed to yesterday as compared
with $5,800 for the preceeding day.
The . women's share in yesterday's
sales was $650, or $750 less than on
the second day.
The members of the faculty are
keeping up the pace they set at the
opening of the campaign, by con-
tinuing to subscribe. Their over-sub-
scription now totals $41,150. The
sum raised by that body on Friday
was almost doubled by yesterdey's
subscription.
Men Work Hard
Five men teams are developing a
spirit of competition, which, it is ex-
pected, will help to boost the em-
paign during the coming week.The
team captained by John D. Hibbard,
'18E, is still in the lead with subscrip-
tions to the amount. of $5,800 to its
credit. H. A. Knowlson, 118E, is cap-
tain of the second highest team, hav-
ing raised $2,050. The teams of
Stephen S. Attwood, '18E, and F. H.
Tinsman, '18D, are each credited with
$1,650. Albert E. Horne, 18, and his
team, sold $1,600 bonds.
Motarboard Leads Women
Motarboard, women's senior society,
is still in the lead over the Wyvern
team of the rival junior society, with
$2,150 to its credit. The Wyvern
team has so far raised $1,850.
Subscriptions to the loan through-
out the country are generally lagg-
ing. Less than one-half the minimum
sum asked by the government has so
far been subscribed, with more than
half the allotted time gone. The mem-
bers of the University committee
therefore considered it a still greater
duty on the part of the campus to
raise $200,000 that was set as a new
goal for the 'students and faculty.
Women's League Buys
At the meeting of the board of direc-
tors of the Women's league held yes-
terday morning in Barbour gymna-
sium, it was decided that the league
would purchase a $100 Liberty Bond.-
National Total Less Than Half
As the nation last night completed
half of its four weeks third Liberty
Loan campaign with subscriptions of;
$1,371,055,300 or a little less than
half the $3,000,000,000 minimum total,
reported to the treasury, cable dis-
patches brough word that Germany's
eighth popular war loan was just
closing with $3,461,000,000 subscrip-
tion.-
Tonight's treasury figures brought
the total of the American people's con-
tributions to war loans including the
first and second Liberty Loans in one
year up to $7,179,000,000. With the
addition of the eighth loan Germany
has raised from her people in a little
more than three and one-half years
of war about $20,800,000,000.
Dental College Given Rating of "A"
The dental college has been given
rating of "A" in an inspection made by
the government. Inspections are be-
ing made of all dental colleges to de-
termine which of them may keep men
enlisted in the medical enlisted re-
serve corps, upon inactive lists, to
complete their courses.

LEE A. WHITE,'10 TO
BE JOURNALISM HEAD
Lee A. White, '10, editorial secre-
tary of the Detroit News, has been se-
cured to take the place of Mr. John
A. Mosenfelder as instructor of jour-
nalism in the University. Mr. Mosen-
felder, who is a graduate of the liter-
ary class of 1917, is leaving tomor-
row with the ordnance corps for
Augusta, Ga.
While at the University, Mr. White
was active on the staff of The Michi-
igan Daily, of which he was manag-
ing editor in his senior year, and was
the founder and first managing edi-
tor of the Gargoyle. During the col-
lege year 1916-17 Mr. White supple-
mented some of Mr. Lyman Bryson's
courses in journalism, by delivering
a series of lectures to the latter's
classes.
All the journalism classes will meet
in room 205 of West hall.
'ENGINEERS SEE TRENCH
RAID AT CAMP CUSTER
SENIORS ANY) FACULTYSPEND
TWO DAYS AS GUESTS
OF REGIMENT
Reproductions of trench warfare
and dynamite destruction as it is car-
ried on in France, featured the visit
of the senior engineers to Camp Cus-i
ter last Thursday and Friday.
The party, including Professors King,
Cox, Gram, Decker, Cissel, Alt, Ems-
wiler and Hawley, arrived at the
Camp Thursday morning and was met
at the train by Colonel Caples, com-
mander of the 310th regiment, and
Col. A. H. Lovell, formerly professor
of electrical engineering at the Uni-
versity. The morning was spent in
an inspection of the camp, while in
the afternoon the group divided up
and inspected different branches of
work under the officers in charge.
A parade and guard mount was held
Thursday night, followed by a smoker
and get-together between the seniors
and the men of the 310th regiment,
whose guests they were. The soldiers
furnished a varied entertainment, in-
cluding boxing matches, camp songs,
and vaudeville shows. The students
reciprocated with Michigan songs and
jazz music.
A trench raid, exactly reproducing
conditions as they exist at the front,
was carried out Friday afternoon un-
der the direction of Major Laverack
and Captains Knight and Algie of the
British army. A series of trenches
labeled "The Kaiser's" was taken by
the U. S. troops with the aid of hand-
grenade companies,, a barrage fire
by trench motars, and a number of
snipers. The men were practically
invisible as they crept over the
ground between the trenches, drop-
ping in and out of shell holes like
veteran campaigners. The snipers
kept up a destructive fire and the
machine gunners accounted for many
of the "enemy's" men.
A parade of the second battalion
followed and after an interchange of
cheers the party left for Ann Arbor.
Houses Passes Big Money Bill for Navy
Washington, April 20.-The naval
appropriation bill carrying approxi-
mately $1,312,000,000 immediately
available to meet the navy's war re-
quirements was passed unanimously
by the house late today without a

record vote. Included in the appro-
priations was an item of more than
$10,000,000 for hospitals at home and
abroad.
British Officers Stay in France
London, April 20.-The great ma-
jority of British army officers "on
leave" do not cross the channel but
remain in France. Many spend their
time in Paris while others go down
into the country renewing friendships
made in the early days of the war.
It is stated that quite a large number
have married French girls and spend
short leave at "home."
German Mattresses of Paper
The Hague, April 20-Owing to the
necessity of conserving the supplies
of straw in German, soldiers' mat--
tresses are henceforth to be stuffed
with old newspapers. School children
are being organized to collect the
pagers for this purpose.

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AMERICAN FORCES IN R ENNERES WOOD
REPULSE 1200 GERMAN SHOCK TROOPS
WITH, GREAT LOSS AFTER HA'RD FIGH

* '* * * * * * * * * *
MEETING OF SENIOR CLASS'
PRESIDENTS
The presidents of the senior
classes are requested to meet with'
a committee from the Student'
council tonight at the Union at
6:30 o'clock. Certain details of
Swing-out and other coming
events are to be discussed.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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'U-BOAT GETS A HME
SHIP ON MA1IN VOYGE
FIVE OFFICERS AND 39MEN ON,
MISSING LIST; COMMANDER <
AND 12 MEN LAND SAFELY
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 20.-The Ameri-;
can steamer Lake Moor sailing on
her maiden voyage, with a naval crew
aboard, was sunk by an enemy sub-
marine in European waters about
midnight, April 11. Five officers and
39 men are missing. Five officers, in-
cluding Lieutenant Commander J. K.
Powers and 12 enlisted men have been
landed at an English port. The Lake
Moor was a cargo carrier of 4,500
tons, and was built according to the
latest specifications of the shipping
board.
One Michigan man, Robert W.1
Meachim of Blissfield is among the
list of missing.
ENEMY WOMEN MAY
NOW BE INTERNED
Washington, April 20.-Under the
provisions of a proclamation issued
by President Wilson today, unnatura-
lized German and Austrian Women'
more than 14 are subject to arrest
and internment if they violate the
laws or are regarded as dangerous.
German women must register at some
future date to be announced by the
Attorney General. German women are
forbidden to enter barred zones about
waterfronts and warehouses without
special permit.
By these restrictions the govern-
ment hopes to rid the country of wo-
men who are suspected of having pro-
moted German propaganda even after
their husbands or other male relatives
were interned.
INDIANA CITY TO PUBLISH
NAMES OF BONI) SLACKERS
South Bend, Ind., April 20.-As a
result of the failure of the third Loan
drive in St. Joseph county, officials
of the Liberty Loan committee have
declared their intention of publish-
ing a dishonor roll of the people of
the county.
The roll will include the names of
all who, in the opinion of the officials,
are able to afford a bond, but have
not bought one. This list will be
published in South Bend, and a du-
plicate sent to Washington.
County Draft Call is for 88 Men
Eighty-eight men is the quota of
Washtenaw county for draft call num-
ber 140, and the local selective ser-
vice board has published the list of
men who will leave for Camp Custer
April 29. The call is for 83 men, but
substitutes are always named to take
the place. of any possible absentees.
These men will leave Ann Arbor on
special train at 9 o'clock Monday
morning, April 29.
Report on Unsold Wheat Is Asked
The federal authorities have re-
quested the Washtenaw county food
administration to make a report on
the amount of unsold wheat being
stored here. County Food Adminis-
trator Grooves requests all local peo-
ple who have wheat in their posses-
sion to notify him.
British Have Pig Controller

ENEMY CAPTURE SEICHEPREY
VILLAGE BUT ARE
EJECTED
U. S. AVIATORS BRING
DOWN GERMAN PLANES
Many Teuton Dead in No 'Man's Land
Testify to the Success of
American Troops
(By Associated Press)
With the American Army in France,
April 20.-Twelve hundred picked Ger-
man storm troops, the greatest num-
ber ever concentrated against the
American troops for an offensive op-
eration, were hurled against the Amer-
ican positions on -a one-mile front
west of Renneres forest, northwest 01
Toul today, after a terrifie bombard-
ment of gas and high explosive shells.
Fight Hand to Hand
The enemy succeeded in penetrating
the front line trenches and taking thie
village of Seicheprey, but after hand
to hand fighting which was still going
on at nightfall, the American troops
recaptured the village and most 01
the ground lost in the early fighting
. Enemy Losses Heavy
The enemy's casualties are believed
to have been the heaviest yet sustained
in any operation against American
troops. Many German dead are lying
in No Man's Land in front of the Amer-
ican trenches, while the Americar
lines remained virtually intact.
German Aviators Brought Down
German airmen flying at low alti-
tude poured streams of machine gun
fire into the American troops in an
attempt to disorganize them but the
anti-aircraft batteries came into play
and the American airmen took the
air, bringing down two of the enem3
planes, and driving the other away
All the American flyers returned it
safety.
. No Americans were taken prisoners
but three Germans were captured.
British Front Quiet
London, April 20.-' There was no
fighting of great importance on the
British front today, according to Fiel
Marshal Haig's report from head-
quarters. The operations were con-
fined for the most part of small af
fairs carried on by tfie British who
succeeded in improving their line
Germans Win and Lose
Paris, April 20. - German attack:
against the Belgians today resulted in
the gaining of some ground by the en
emy, who, however, was almost im
mediately driven back, according to
the Belgian official communication:
tonight.

French Lines Shelled
Paris, April 20.-There was stro
artillery activity today west of t
Avre, and on both sides of the Meu
The Germans gained some ground
a minor attack east of St. Mihiel, I
were later ejected, according to t
war office announcement tonight.
Expect Renewed Fighting
London, April 20.-Renewal of hea
fighting is momentarily looked :
along the western battle front, n
only on the Flanders line, but to t
south in the Somme area where 1
Germans made their bid for a qui
victory last month and failed in th
larger purpose of dividing the Brit:
and French armies at a single stro
Reports from the front show tl
signs are not wanting that the G
mans propose attacking again in I
Amiens area where this imports
railway center' is the main objecti
Against this blow the armies of
nations are standing together not 0]
to repel the inevitable attack, but
strike back when the proper momE
comes.
In the north the enemy, after
bitter reverse of Thursday and F
day along the Givenchy-St. VincE
line, apparently is pausing to organ
more thoroughly for an attack up
Mt. Kemmel.
The Germans were compelled to ma

_ - - - - t

London, April 20.- The board of tain infantry in activity alon
agriculture has appointed a pig con- the entire Lys front on Satu
troller with a view of promoting the suffering the terrific. losses
extension of pig keeping to increase British imposed in breakir
the country's food supply. massed enemy assaults.

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