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April 18, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-18

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N QUOTA!

BOOST YOUR COUNTRY AND ALMA MAT]

THE WEATHER
SHOWERS A-ND COOLER
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DlAY AND NIGHT M
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O . XXVIII. No. 137:

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 1918.

PRICE THREE CENTS

ERMANS CAPTURE POILKAPPELLE,
LANGEMARCK, NORTHEAST OF YPRES1
BRITISH RETIRE FROM WYTSCHAETE

THIRD LIBERTY LOAN DRIVE BEGINS
AS 400 MEN AND WOMEN ARE SWORN
INTO COUNTY PREPAREDNESS BOARD

AVY ROMIBARI{1ENTS
OF MONTI)IDIER; NO
FANTRY ACTION

NO T1
IN-

TISH MAINTAIN
LINES NEAR ARRAS

le on Ninth Day Increase
Intensity on Fron From 3c-
tere t Mcsmiis Ridge

1I

BULLETIN
Berlin via. London, April 17.-The
Germans have occupied Poelkappelle
and ILangemarck northeast of Ypres.
The announcement is made by general
hea tquarters this evening.
After gaining a footing today in
the village of Meteren and Wytschaete,
the British were forced to make a
second retirement, according to Field
Marshall Haig's report from France
tonight.
Bombardment North of Montdidler
Paris, April 17.-- There were heavy
bombarments today north of Mont-
didier but no infantry action, accord-
ing to the war office announcement
tonight. The text of the statement
says:
"There were no infantry actions
during the day. The enemy bombard-
ed our first line and several villages
near Montdder. Our battries counter
shelled the enemy.
"On April 15 and 16 four German
airplanes were brought down.
British Holding at Arras
Ottawa, Ont., April 17. -An attack
is impending between Bailleul and
Wytschaete, says a correspondent at
British headquarters in France in a
dispatch received here tonight.
The correspondent adds that the
.British are maintaining their posi-
tions south of Arras.
(By Associated Press)
April 17.-Out of the chaos of the
tremendous battle along the Lys
river south and southwest of Ypres,
there have come during the past day
reports which are more encourging
to the allies. The British have held
all the ground which they were be-
fending on Tuesday and have struck
back so that Meteren and Wytschaete
were retaken and held for a time.
Germans Gain Near Ypres
The most disturbing news has been
a report from Berlin that Poelkappelle
and Langemarek have been taken by
the Germans.
The battle, now in its ninth day,
has deepened in intensity at many
points along the front from Messines
ridge to Meteren. There have been
reports that the Germans have oc-
cupied the village of St. Elo which
lies less than three miles south of
Ypres.
Fierce Fighting on Arras Sectors
The line in front of Arras has been
the scene of fighting. In the Picardy
sector there has been lively artillery
engagements.
The Turks announce that they have
taken the city of Batun.
Baron Rajecz has been named for-
eign minister of Austria-Hungary.
FRENCH PLAY DIRECTED
BY PROFESSOR E. L. ADAMS
Rehearsals for "Le Retour Imprevu"
and "L'Avocat Patelin," the plays to
be presented next Thursday night by
the Cercle Francais, which until re-
cently have been held in the society
rooms, have been transferred to
Sarah Caswell Angell hall, where th
plays will be produced next week.
Following the example of the Cer-
cle Francais in 1911 and 1915, two
one-act plays will be given this year
rather than the single longer drama.
Prof. E. L. Adams, a member cf the
French department, and faculty di-
rector of the Cercle Francais, is in
charge of the production of the plays
next Thursday. "Les Pattes de
Mouche," the play presented by the
Cercle last year, was coached by Pro-
fessor Adams, with the assistance of
Prof. A. B. Johrison. This play, to-
gether with "L'Amour - Medecin,"

which was performed in January by
the French faculty members, offers
ample proof of Professor Adam's abil-
itv aa director of French drama.

Companies Move
To Ferry Field
Beginning today the military com-
panies will meet on Fery Field for
athletic drill at 4:15 o'clock instead
of in Waterman gymnasium. Each
day the companies which used to have
gym work on that day will go to the
south end of Ferry Field, where they
will be put through various forms of
athletic exercises and games.
Three diamonds have been laid out
on which indoor baseball will be play-
ed. This game is well known in Ann
krbor and is very popular among the
students. Although the soft ball de-
tractsbsomewhat from the game, it
can be played in a much smalled
space than regulation baseball and in
thus better, where a large number
are going to participate and the space
is limited. Squads will be pitted
against each other, so that every man
in the company, which is having athle-
tic drill, will be able to get into the
game.
Regulation baseball will be played
by picked teams from the companies.
Each company will be represented, a
schedule will be arranged, and the
championship of the brigadeedeter-
mined. There will be a meeting of
representatives from the companies at
1:30 o'clock Saturday in order to dis-
cuss plans for the season.
Masks, catchers' mitts bats, and
balls will be furnished but the players
will have to use their own fielders'
and first basemen's gloves. The
regular baseball teams will practice
on the days when their companies are
having athletic drill on Ferry Field.
RAILROAD BOARD
RUNS ERIE CANAL
Washington, April 17. - Director
General McAdoo tonight ordered that
the Erie canal be taken over by the
railroad administration and that a
fleet of barges be constructed im-
mediately to operate under the di-
rection of G. A. Tomlinson of Duluth,
Minn. It is hoped by this way to re-
lieve freight traffic.
IEDIC'S MUST PROVE ABILITY
TO WIN RESERVE COMMISSIONS
Men on the inactive list of the medi-
cal enlisted reserve corps in school
must show their instructors that they
have the capability and special re-
quirements needed if they wish to be-
come officers in the corps upon gra-
duation, according to word received
at the dental college.
Men who show little promise of be-
coming satisfactory officers should
be divided from the capable ones and
be sent into the service as laboratory
or other assistants in the camps.
The action probably to be taken
at the dental college will be to grade
each man along several different lines
such as character, interest in work,
special ability or inclinations, and let
the War department itself decide up-
on the merits of each case. The or-
der emphasizes the fact that schools
should by no means lower the qualifi-
cationsof graduates in order to keep
certain- favored students from the
draft.
UMION ANNOUNCES COMMITTEES
FOR ELECTION DAY, MAY 3
Announcement was made yesterday
of the nominating and election com-
mittees for the Union offices which
will be filled on campus election day,

May 3.
The former committee, which will
make the nominations, is composed of
Stephen S. Attwood, '18E, chairman;
Alan W. Boyd, '18; Harold C. Cram-
er. '18D; A. L. Kirkpatrick, '18, and
James W. Thomas, '18L.
The election committee, which will
have charge of the balloting, is head-
ed by William S. Kammerer, '18L, as-
sisted by Lowell B. Genebach, '20;
William W. Hinshaw, Jr., '20, and
Donald M. Springer, '19E.
The nominating committee is to
make its report the early part of next
week.

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The R. O. T. C. companies,'
men in the ordnance course, and'
the drafted men training here will
meet at 6:45 o'clock sharp tonight
at Waterman gymnasium to take'
part in the Liberty Loan parade.'
The other departments of.the Uni-
versity not connected with the'
above will meet at the same time'
as follows:'
Members of the faculty, on the'
diagonal walk, north of the Law
building.
Students in the literary college,
State street, south of the Law'
building.
Law students, on the campus'
walk, east of the Law building.'
Engineering students, east of'
the Science building.
Medical students, west side of
the Medical building.'
Dents, Pharmics, and Homoe-'
ops, north University avenue, in'
front of the Chemistry building.'
All women students wishing to
take part in the parade are urged
to line up at 6:45 o'clock sharp'
behind the literary students, in'
in front of University hall.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Faculty

_ Over-Subscribes
Total Subseription
$102,050

&Qll ~;

UNIVERSITY PROMISED HONOR
FLAG IF QUOTA IS
REACHED
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR BIG PARADE

* * * * * * * * * * *
TOTALS IN CAMPUS DRIVE
Yesterday's faculty subscrip-
tions ....................$ 14,800
Previously announced ... 87,250
Campus total..........$102,050
Faculty over-subscrip-
tion ....................$ 22,050

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ONE OF THE BIG SCENES IN "MIS S HOBBS," THE FARCE WHICH
THE COMEDY CLUB PRESENT S TOMORROW NIGHT AT THE
MAJESTIC THEATER.

DESTRUCTION OF ART IS
NO ADVNTAE TO IIUNS
PROF. H. R. CROSS SAYS GERMANS
AIM FOR LARGEST
TARGETS
"The destruction bf works of art by
the Germans is done merely for des-
truction's sake as it has no military
advantages," said Prof. Herbert R.

COMBINED CLUBS WILL
ISI iLANSING PI. 26
PLANS ALSO BEING MADE FOR
SPRING CONCERTS IN TWO
OThER CITIES
The Varsity Glee and Mandolin
clubs will give a concert in Lansing
on April 26, according to the an-
nouncement of the management of the

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(Philip Slomovitz)
The third Liberty Loan drive among
the students officially began last night

* * * * * * * * * * * *

* when more than 400 men and women
were sworn in as members of the

Cross in his talk last night in Alumni clubs yesterday.

Memorial hall on " The German Des-
truction of Works of Art."
The talk was accompanied by slides
showing buildings in Belgium and
France before and after the German
bombardment of them. "They took
special pains to destroy the cathedrals
as they were the most prominent
buildings and the easiest marks for
the German guns," Professor Cross
pointed out, "Although other build-
ings of some of the towns were more
important commercially the cathed-
rals contained priceless, un-replace-
able art treasures which were not
merely the pride of Belgium and
France but of the whole world."
aMore Valuable Works Protected
"The Germans did not confine them-
selves to buildings which were still
in their entirety" he continued "But
even more completely destroyed the
picturesque and historic ruins."
Pictures were shown which depicted
the manner in which the more valua-
ble works of art in Paris and Italy
have been c.overed in order to protect
them so far as possible from German
and Austrian air raids.
Professor Cross related how the
Belgians removed the priceless paint-
ings from the Louvon cathedral to
England in order to save them from
destruction by the German shells.
Italian Art Uninjured
Prof. Cross said that thanks to pro-
vidence Italy's countless art treasures
have almost wholly escaped injury
and he hoped that it would be possible
to preserve them from the wanton de-
struction of the 'huns.'
colN TYI' ED) (ROSS AE
BIG FORTNIGHTLY SI1>MENT
A Alarge shipment, which includes
all articles made from Myarch 28 to
April 12, was made by the Washtenaw
county branch of the Red Cross yes-
terday. One hundred and seventeen
pairs of socks were completed besides
106 other knitted garments. Surgical
dressings numbered 11,102, and shirts,
pajamas, and jackets of various kinds,
215. The supplies were completed by
20 pairs of bed socks and 400 hospital
bags.
Inspecting and packing of all arti-
cles turned in is now being carried on
at 514 Williams street. Space in the
Dieterle store building has been dona.-
ted for the purpose. The work of
the Ann Arbor chapter is still sent
directly, without inspection as for-
merly.
A quota of knitted goods to be fin-
ished between each shipment .is now
regularly assigned,. and yarn is dis-
tributed to registered knitters until
the quota is filled.

Alumni in Lansing have been eager
for some time to secure the engage-
ment and the date has finally been
arranged. The purpose of the concert
is to reorganize the alumni associa-
tion in the capital city. The net pro-
ceeds are to be given to the Red Cross
for .war work in France. Every effort
will be made to take the entire mem-
bership of the combined clubs and
repeat the success of the recent Ann
Arbor concert.
Entertainment is being arranged by
the alumni. Plans are different in
Lansing than other cities where the
clubs will appear. All members will
be entertained at the homes of the
alumni instead of being accommodated
at the hotel. A reunion banquet is
scheduled for Friday evening of the
concert. It will be held at 6:30 o'clock
in honor of the clubs. Maize and blue
dress ribbons will be worn by every
member as at the February concert.
Grand Rapids and Port Huron are
planning on having the clubs for con-
certs this spring. The former city is
attempting to arrange for an appear-
ance the night following the Lansing
concert. Other cities will also be on
the schedule. The clubs were forced
to refuse an engagement for an ex-
tended trip through Indiana and I1-
linois before vacation. They were
asked to sing in the interest of the
Liberty Loati campaign in those
states.
The final rehearsal of the Glee club
will be held at 7 o'clock tonight in
the School of Music. Attendance at
this rehearsal will determine the per-
sonnel of the club for the trip.
COUNT BOAIN)R REVa TES
CAIL FOR 3I2 DRAFTED MEN
Orders were received yesterday by
the local selective draft board from
the adjutant general for 32 men to be
sent to Columbus barracks, Colum-
bus, Ohio, on May 10. No special re-
quirements were mentioned in the
orders.
The men are to be inducted from
class one and will be credited to the
next quota. Men engaged in agricul-
ture are not to be taken. It is not
known where the men will be sent
after they reach the Columbus bar-
racks.
Lieutenant Sent To Ordnance School
First Lieuten'ant Samuel *G. Barker,
graduate of Yale university, and of
the first officer's training camp at
Fort Monroe, has been assigned to
the ordnance school here as assistant
to Captain E. T. White. lie was sta-
tioned at Watertown arsenal until
the closing of that station.

DRESS REHEARSAL
FOR "MISS HOBBS"
The scene above on this page from
"Miss Hobbs," the farce which the
Comedy Club will present at the Ma-
jestic theater tomorrow night, shows
Miss Hobbs herself, Jean Maclennan,
'19, seated, with Wolf Kingsearl, John
C. Carey, at her feet, luring him into
making love to her as part of her
campaign for the liberation of oppres-
sed womanhood.
To the right is Mrs. Percival King-
searl, Eva M. Herzberg, '19, who Miss
Hobbs believes is the wife of the
man at her feet. Looking over the
screen at the back is Millicent Farey,
Mary Dodge Brown, '18, another in-
mate of what the men of the neigh-
borhood call, "Miss Hobb's lunatic
asylum." It is but one of the many
sparkling scenes in the play.
The first dress rehearsal will be
held this morning at the Majestic,
the members of the cast having been
excused from classes for the purpose.
STUDENTS SAVE PRESIDENT'S
FURNITURE WHEN HOUSE BURNS
Madison, Wis. April 17.-Students
carried out the furniture and house-
hold goods of Pres. C. R. Van Hise, of
the University of Wisconsin, when his
home caught fire last Wednesday.
The fire started from a blow-torch
used by a painter and for a time
threatened the entire structure. About
$3,000 damage was done before it was
extinguished, and in the meantime
crowds of students carried out the
furniture and a company of cadets
who were drilling nearby stood guard.
PROF. I1. C. SADLER TO ASSIST
IN STEEL SHIP CONSTRUCTION
Prof. Herbert C. Sadler, head of
the marine engineering department
of the engineering college, has been
called to Washington to assist the
government in steel ship construction.
Professor Sadler has been granted
a leave of absence by the University
and will report at the capital about
May 5th. He has been active in gov-
ernment work here at the University
ever since the declaration of war.
Prof. Edward -M. Bragg will carry
on the work in marine engineering
and naval architecture during Profes-
sor Sadler's absence.
SENIORS MUST ORDER CAPS
AND GOWNS SOMETIME TODAY
Orders for caps and gowns will be
taken today for the last time.
All seniors who have not yet made
arrangments for "swing-out" must do
so today or the caps and gowns will
not be here for April 26.
George Kyer and George Moe are
the dealers handling the caps and
gowns, and the Wadhams 'company
are taking the orders for the senior'
canes.

Washtenaw county War Preparedness
committee by Roscoe 0. Bonisteel,
'12L, general organizer of the commit-
tee. Room 101 of the Economics
building was filled to its capacity
when the members of the student
committee pledged their allegiance to
the causes for which America stands,
and declared themselves ready to do
any war preparedness work for the
county committee whenever called up
on to do so.
Warns Gathering
In introducing Bonisteel, the prin-
cipal speaker of the evening, Frank
Bacon, '20, who acted as chairman,
warned the gathering that there were
traitors as well as German spies in
this country, and that it was the
duty of every loyal American to help
fortify the trenches in the rear of the
battlefields, the trenches at home.
Promises Flag
Bonisteel promised the campus, on
behalf of the Washtenaw county com-
mittee that an honor flag would be
given if the quota ascribed the stu-
dents should be over subscribed.
Prof. Clyde E. Love, of the mathe-
matics department, general campus
chairman of the faculty canvass, ex-
plained the terms of the Loan and the
mechanism of the plan for the drive.
He emphasized the fact that no appli-
cations would be accepted unless ac-
companied by five per cent of the sub-
scription on the government plan, or
ten per cent on the bank plan.
Prof. Wilson Speaks
Prof. Clyde E. Wilson, of the engin-
eering college, chairman of the stu-
dent canvass among the men, ex-
plained the plan for the subdivision of
the teams, and the duties of each vol-
unteer. Mildred C. Mighell, '18, di-
rector of the canvass among the wo-
men, met with her committee, and dis-
cussed the plans of the drive among
the women.
A women's representative will be in
room 102 Economics building from 5
to 5:30 o'clock daily to receive re-
turns of sales. The women voluteers
who were not present at yesterday's
meeting, or who failed to get the
necessary credentials, may call at this
time and see the officials in charge.
.Plans for Parade Completed
Plans have already been completed
for the Liberty Loan parade in which
the city and .University are to take
part. The Varsity band will head the
line. President Harry B. Hutchins
will be at the head of the faculty,
while Mayor Ernst M. Wurster will
lead the city's representation. The
parade, will wind up at the Court
House, where an open air pep meet-
ing will.be held.
City. Lacks $63985
Ann Arbor lacked $63,985 yester-
day afternoon of filling her quota
having subscribed $804,310.,° The local
committee is confident of flying an
honor flag by tomorrow noon. The
county has already subscribed $1,$44,-
860, lacking $207,435 of filling the
quota.

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