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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PECILIZATION TALKS I
BY CAMPUS PROFESSORS

Mm

TIONS WEl

'I

u

Y. M. C. A. EMPLOYMENT BUREA
ANXIOUS TO INCREASE ITS US]
FULNESS TO STUDENTS.

U
E- s

94

your

k Co.
'e

R STEAM
FORKS
ed 1887

RY CLEANING, PRESS-
STEAM CLEANING AT
-ITY PRICES.

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO
INSPECT OUR WORK.
FOR
EVERYTHING
ELECTRICAL
No Job too Small or too Large
WASHTENAW
ELECTRIC SHOP
"The Shop of Quality"
If it's not right we make it right
- PHONE 273 -

PROF. A. Bi STEVENS DISCUSSES
THE REQUIREMENTS FOR
PHARMACISTS
(By Prof. A. B. Stevens.)
The team "pharmacy" has a double
meaning. It is frequently applied to
the place of business where the prac-
tice of pharmacy is conducted. It is
also applied to the profession which'
treats of the compounding and dispen-
sing of drugs and chemicals for medi-
cinal use. This includes a knowledge'
of the collection, observation, and
identification of drugs and chemicals.
Hence a college of pharmacy is gen-
erally considered as a place where
students are preparing to practice the
profession of pharmacy as conducted
in a drug store. This was doubtless
the original idea when the demands
for chemists were limited and' chemi-
cali invetiigatl'ns of various sorts
were conducted by pharmacists, who,
in order to be skilled pharmacists,
must be chemists. But conditions
have changed. The demands for edu-
cated pharmacists are no longer from
dr'ug stores alone, but come from
many other lines requiring accurate
chemical training.
The qualifications for success in
pharmacy aretherefore somewhat
variable. Two students having the
same training duid the same standing
in their college work but with dif-
ferent dispositions will not be equally
successful in the same line of work.
A student who is diffident may make
a good chemist but a very poor sales-
man, and salesmanship is a prere-
quisite to success in commercial phar-
macy. Therefore the qualifications'
for success in commercial pharmacy.
are a thorough pharmaceutical edu-
cation, a naturally cheerful disposi-
tion, accuracy in manipulation, tact,
ability to read human nature, keen
perception, and, last but by no means
least, cleanliness. A fair degree of
success may be achieved without the
possession of all of the above quali-
fications, but the degree of success
will be in proportion to their attain-
ment.
The essential qualifications for the
pharmaceutical chemist are accuracy,
initiative, cleanliness, close observa-
tion, ability to detect and interpret
slightechanges. If one is naturally
-careless and possessed of slovenly
habits which cannot be corrected, he
should by no means enter upon the
study of pharmacy.
The demand for chemists with
special pharmaceutical training is
constantly on' the increase and at
present far exceeds the supply. It
comes from pharmaceutical manufac-
turing houses, drug and food labora-
tories, national and state laboratories
for drug and food inspectors as well
as for analysts.

Editor, The Michigan Daiiy:
The Y. M. C. A. employment office
welcomes all suggestions which are
made for the purpose of increasing
its efficiency and enlarging its use-
fullness, both to students who desire
employment and to Ann Arbor resi-
dents who are in need of help.
The suggestion which was recently
made through this column that all
summer positions should be carefully
examined before offered to prospec-
tive employes by such an agency as
this 'office.
It is the policy of this office to care-
fully investigate the merits of all
summer propositions and jobs reerred
to it. If the linVestigation proves
either that the firms which are seek-
ing employes are unreliable finan-
cially, or that their products are with-
out merit, no effort is made to secure
the desired employes. After having
investigated the above points in each
case to our satisfaction the effort is
then made to find the right student
for the job. But at that point we
feel that our r'sponsibility ends. We-
cannot sign the contract for the stu-
dent. He must be the judge of its
validity and fairness. We are glad
to advise him on this point but he
must make the decision. On the
other hand we cannot guarantee the
services of the student to the employ-
er. He must take the responsibility.
During the spring vacation more
that 200 jobs were assigned by this
office. We were 'unable to fill all re-
quests. A few studentshave failedrto
perform their work satisfactorily. In
a few in sances the dealings of em-
ployers with the employed have not
been considered fair and satisfactory.
In either case the name is dropped
from our lists.
At this time we do not have avail-
able the names of a sufficient number
of students to supply the demands for
help of various kinds.
We want the names of all students
who desire employment and would
urge those desiring the services of
students to notify this office at least
one day in advance..
The hours of the employment office
(Room 5, Law Bldg.) are 9-12 and
2-5 daily excepting Saturday after-
noon and Sunday. The telephone
number is 823.
Applications for Army Y. M. C. A.
secretaryships may also be filed in
this office. There is an urgent demand
for men who are above draft age
for oiver-seas duty.

F
pl
an
ag
ml
op
pl

Calkins
Drug
Co.

"Sappy New"

SEASON.

WE WO

Neckties and S
For Easter Wear

ABOUT GET
TER KODAK

Varsity Toggery Sh
1107 S. University Ave.
WHOLESOME

IT'S TIME

Tr our Drinks fr
our Sanitary Fount1

TO TALK WITH YOU A

Fountain of Yout
DELIGHTFUL Corner State and Liberty
DELIGTFULRE3

FR ATERNITIES

200 E. Washington
Ann Arbor

Arrange for Your

117 Pearl
Ypsilanti

our Chop Suey
daR+ An l nio Ti"o-

GROUP PHOTOGRA
Unsurpassed Accommodations

1;nmese ana american z
WAI KING LOO
Joe Gin, Prop.
413 S. State St. Pho

Diishes 1

PHONE 948-W

619 E.

nne 1244-MI

The Literary Critic Says
SEA-DOGS AND MEN AT ARMS, a
Canadian Book of Songs, by Jesse!
EdgarNMiddleton. G. P. Putman's
Sons, New York.

E. G. HERSMAN,
Employment and Financial Secretary

.

'I

. I

Union Hall is
No/v Mess Tent

l
t

L.OUR SITUATION
NOW SATISFACTORY
According to local bakers, the sup-
y of flour in Ann Arbor is normal,
d there is no fear of another short-
e. This is due partly to the fact that
lls have received orders to resume
eration, and also because the peo-
e of Ann Arbor are conserving the

Realize f
pleasure of
Food. Pri
Service P

I

War brings out a few real poets,
many near-poets, and still more
would-be poets. Jesse Middleton
Fountain Pens seems to lay claim to each of these
Waterman titles to some extent. His songs are
} and ConKln for the most part quite common-place,
-not deep enough to be spiritual, and
eyfried not intimate enough to seem genuine.
And yet, he surprises us now and
" -- then by tripping us up and calling us
'W' WAj to attention by a bit of real poetry
PAY 1ENTS hidden in among trite phrases
and hackeneyed words. The out-
.e Student's standing feature of his collection is
hich $25,000 the absolute and convincing sincerity
ber are asev- of his verses, which cannot fail to
1 statements lend them much force and quite a
of the mjith little beauty, and spite of their unfor-
paying.. tunate and weak wording. One has
ed for this ever the feeling that here is a man
work of the who is a poet at soul, but whom the
camps" said muse has passed by and left with but
a statement a meagre pedium of expression.
o have not
5 are-there- West Hall to Open Thursday
early date." Rhetoric classes will again meet in
>e made at West. hall beginning Thursday ac-
w building, cording to an announcement made yes-
rrie. terday by Prof. Fred N. Scott of the
rhetoric department. The old sched-
c. Staebler ule will be followed both in regard to
Ldv. the rooms and hours.

SMALL COLLEGES TQ RECEIVE ..
FINANCIAL AID FROM NATION
Small colleges that have been hard
hit financially by the war have been
assured of helpful legislation by
Majority Leader Kitchin of the House
of Representatives, and other reve-
nue legislation leaders. Numerous
stories have come to Congress that
many schools are on the verge of a
financial collapse,
Bequests of states to educational
and charitable institutions are at
present not included' in the provi-
sion that they should be tax exempt,
it is said, by an oversight. As a re-
sult, there has been a stiff rate on
all inheritance taxes, and a consider-
able portion of the gifts that have
been of great support to the colleges.
This has not only cut down the
amount already donated to the col-
leges, but has discouraged the prac-
tice of giving.
Aside from this, tutition fees have
been cut down by large enlistments of
the men students and prospective stu-
dents. Representative Rainey, of Il-
linois, ranking democrat of the waysl
and means committee, is ' in charge
of amendments which will take off
the present war tax burdens from
educational and charitable institu-
tions.

Devotees of dancing will find one
of their favorite habitats, the Michigan
Union dance hall, now resembling a
mess tent. Ten long tables accom-
modate the army stores men and the
aero mechanics who arrived yester-
day.
The tables will, of course, be moved
every night on which there is a dance,
but during "business-as-usual" times,
the Union will preserve its semi-
cantonment aspect. -
The army stores men and the aero
mechanics will have the same meal
hours, and the food will be served
army fashion. Each man will serve
himself from platters placed on the
tables. At the end of each meal, ser-
geants will inspect all the plates to
see that no food has been wasted.
An additional entrance has been
constructed on the east side of the
building to accommodate the increas-
ed body of men who will henceforth
make use o'f the Union.
The new Union clubhouse is now be-
ginning to take on a more finished ap-
pearance. The tower has reached its
full height, and work on the statues,
which are to be placed above the en-
trance, is progressing rapidly. Win-
dows are being installed, and the
structure as a whole shows a mark-
ed progress.

I .

i

supply in their possession.
One of the bakers received a car
load containing 350 barrels of flour
last week, and is expecting two other
orders- to arrive within a few days.
Others have reported that their sup-
ply of wheat flour is satisfactory due
to the Michigan Milling company re-
suming operation, and also because
they have been receiving shipments
from other mills. It is expected that
there will be two carloads more in
the city before the end of next week.
People have been conserving wheat
as shown by the decrease of sales
among the bakers and grocers. Be-
pause of the government ruling that
substitutes be sold with every pur-
chase of flour, people have stopped
baking their own bread. The result is
that bakers are supplying the greater
part of the city with bread, and their
sales show a slight decrease. Aside
from this, bakers are using 25 per
cent of substitutes in the manufacture
of bread, and this has added consid-
erably to the reserve supply of flour,
At present every baker in the city is
well supplied with the article, and ex-
presses no .fear of another shortage.

TRUBE
218 S. Main Sti
Good Lunches of Ric
JQC all the
Chinese and American 4
Short Order
Michigan Inn 601
M ILITARY BA
BE GIVEN BY R

Michigan's first R. O. '
ball will be given next S
in Waterman gymnasiu
tions for the affair ar
made by the members
committee.
The entire R. 0. T.
furnish several numbers
program, while an oz
posed of seven of "Ike
play the remainder of
pieces. "Ike's best" wil
ed of Messrs. Sunley, P
Kunkle, Hamill, Hammor
er.
Tickets will sell for $J
placed on sale at the d
tores on State street t
They can also be procu
members of the band.
The military ball will
and open to the entire
cadets attending are requ
their uniforms. The chE
be announced later.

I-

C. P. CUSHING, '07, EDITING
"SAMMY JOURNAL" IN FRANCE

f,

Leave Copy
at
Students'
Supply Store

Buy your
Chapman's,
Adv.

alarm clocks at J. L
Jeweler. 113 8. Main.

Class Dancing Monday and Thurs-
day evenings at the Packard.-Adv.
2402.--Adv.

WNTED
)-Student, teaching exper-
referable. Educational work
the summer. $225.00 for three
Phone 359-M, 2 to 5 p. m.
FOR SBAL

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.t
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
Victrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

I-

Members of the American expedi-
tionary force have been issuing a
newspaper in France. "The Stars and
Stripes" was started about the time
the Michigan national guardsmen ar-
rived overseas.
Charles Phelps Cushing, '07, form-
erly a Detroitnewspapermman, is man-
aging editor of the "Sammy" journal.
While attending the University, Cush-
ing was on the staff of Collier's Week-
ly. Before enlisting the former Mich-
igan graduate made his .residence at
Kansas City.

Ethel McNeil, 1(
Ethel Reed T

'
a
S
771
1

Dr. Hariry
wood, La.,
land, O., Ap

5.

I at

I

I

T7

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