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October 02, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T s, If-1A

fIMICHIGA 'N DAIL( USAY C0

I

.LI OJfMMULIII
E --ROSEELT!

I

(WCUIIES 11) ITE ). MAY.
MVlU)STREEFT
MIichi ,<n's tneighbo J' r ando-partner
the n Scolo ui pndis2
buligdesigned and.builtesPecal
orit ont;he i:Ofte d (;Elio:. g
.. 1,t raoi . h o Nw-hop .'., de)onMa3y-
above Lthe stretlvcnan h
adInistatve offices: r;?teofie
ir~o~n, a ladies' re: t room, a nd a geis-
tlemnen~s rest room.
The entrance to Frieze Memorial
auditoriumn is in the rear of the main
corridor on the first floor. A very
important change was made in this
auditorium when the stage was moved
from the center of the east end to the
southeast corner. This weill enable
the choral union members to be seat-
ed in exactly the same position that
they will occupy in Hill aduitorium.
'teaching Rooms on Upper Floors
The two upper floors each have
eight large teaching rooms. Each of
these rooms is an outside room a-ad
all are well equipped. Entrance to
these rooms is ygaied through spa-
cious corridors which contrast rather
strangely to those in the old building.
Amodern fireproof steam heating
rdlant has been installed in the base-
ment and the buildling is lighted by
electricity. Besides the heating plant
the ba Ac:eit contains to;n practic,
rom ada fl-,;Proof 'Vault for the
sto)rage of books, music and other
cocunments co~nnected with thequr
t,^r century 4 existenece of the school.
Three Instructors Added to Faculty+
The school has added three new
m'embers to its faculty. All three are
credited by critics as being entirelyl
'able to maintain the standard already
established by thel musical institu-

I; VlLO 1 IJAARY ST1EN(IA'Il
IN TALK
Jonsto,;P;a., Oct. I.-"Gersmany
has rduce savgeryto a sciencean
thsgea L iarfor tevct orious peace'
of justi"ce mu st go on until the Ger-
..an encr s cit can out f the
wor"Tdld body.," d3eclared Thetodore
here yestayltl h Wrkume
"There ,ar,,,olhcia ! r cor (IFs of rm ore;L e i i.
t tr a d i a ) y ," c o n ti n u i e l 6 0 "e _~ r t 00~ io f e
horror upon which the German gov-
ernment has counted."
Quoting from the recent state-
mnents of the Rev. Newell Dwight
Hillis, of Brooklyn, concerning Ger-
man outrages, Colonel Roosevelt add-
ed: "The conditions thus authorita-
$ively described by an unimpeach-
able witness should wake every man
and woman in America to the need of
trying to help the tortured people of
Belgium and France. Your commit-
tees here in Johnstown should get in
touch with Dr. Hillis and follow his
advice as to how to proceed,,and you
should of, course back up the Red
Cross in every way..
"We have gone to war because Ger-
mxany had. during two years, commit-
ted upon us outrages to which no self-
respecting or manly nation could en-
dure. We shall fight in Europe so as
to save ourselves or our children
I'roml the necessity of fighting on our
own continent against alien ccmnquer-
ors. We are also fighting the battle
)f liberty-loving, self-respecting, de-
cently behaved nations ,of mankind.
\Ve must back up the Red Cross and
all similar organizations in every way
possible. I
"But we must remember that our
first duty to develop to, the limit our
military strength. Everything else is
of secondary importance to this. If we
of this great democratic republic do
aot showx that we are able to defend
ourselves by our own might, if we do
not teach Germany that she cannot
commit acts of insolent brutality at

ou expense wthutbeing called t
our ;lvesor for ouir :children a utur
"If this «war enods in a Qer.,a i-
hsrepublic for shtri ghly feols tha
our eX 1-ncei nnptbe 'th tilt,
sFafetyofthaaf sir'fit F dSpifI+auto-
_ acyhich sh emboies 7.-ny mre
111'i7 an ohe at i oa "i hl
world.

"FEET

NEWSCEE

Ber neley, Cal. Oct. 1 '' htoraph
o fet ae -e f 1;work of one of the classes at the Uni-
versity of California. The process
which is, done by members of the
special gymnasium class in therapeu-
tics is done without the aid of a
camera.
The feet of the members of the
class are painted daily with a certain
chemical substance, which, when
pressed' down upon cardboard leaves
a definite and complete photograph of
the foot. The object of the photo is
to enable the instructor to note the
results obtained by a' certain course
of gymnastic exercises.
As both the army and navy are par-
ticular in their physical examinations
of> the feet of recruits, the results will
he extremely valuable both to mem-
bers of the class and to gymnasium
instructors in general because of the
definite way in which physical exer-
cises are shown to be beneficial.
lilichigan Doctors G'et 0 Commissions
Eight University hospital doctors
have recently received their commis-
sions in the new, United States 'army
for foreign service, while several oth-
ers are awaiting for further orders.
The medical amen who have earned
their commissions and are now serv-
ing. are: Doctors Vaughn, major;
Malejahn, captain; Wile, major; Mc-
Garyi first lieutenant;, Shcrrick, first
lieutenant; Foster, major; Kraft, lieu-
tenant; Scarboro, lieutenant, and Hale,
first lieutenant.
Doctors Wile, Sherrick and Kraft
are serving "somewhere in France."

We are paying for this, spar~e for two es
Firs- Webelive te sHfichi ai r tlytbeaodadriig
medium; and
- Sec~nd- We think this p'Dper should rcei 'e the heart>y-support of
thepeople; of Ann A rbhra
'-
I-o
Down on the side street
117 & 119West Librt t
c li Large assortment of
Rugs Linoleums
= Furniture and Draperies
Warm Bedding
= for the cold nights
=1.
Goods of Quality at Lowest Prices
Gike us a call

I s N. Hamilton, one of the
crs, wvill o, upy a position
for in snig Mr. An-
,tock Haigh and MAiss Dor-
s have beein obtained as
pianoforte.

, i
j /-

1917-19.8

I

Ann

Arbor

Concerts

I'ILL AUDITORIUIs
uU

THE WORLD'S GREATEST MUSICAL ATTRACTIONS

AMtE LITA GALLI-CUR+CI
IN SONG RECITAL

. .
i" r

EUGENE YSAYE.
BELGIAN VIOLINIST

ETHEL LEGINSKA

Iu

With Flutist and Pianist
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11, -1917
8: 00 o'Clock
i'Amelita Galli-Curci is an Italian by birth,
a cosmopolite by artistic inclination, an ac-
complished pianist, a talented composer, and
a linguist of rare attainments. She was born
in Milan of Spanish-Italian parents, and is
a graduate of the Musical Conservatory of
her native city, where she won honors as a;
pianist and composer. At the suggestion of
Mascagni, she added singing to her other
accomplishmentS by teaching herself,. and
imade a brilliant debut at the Costanzi
The-atre in Rome. Later, she sang at the
n _cpi prahussinMl , NIlc1
PetrogASMari/ ad ue.-9Ar
Al~uh Mne. ' .Cu'ci d ha si
ye~cot ufailig sucesse abr ate:rec
ognizd ida of pain;to ~ y naght F"e

8:00 o' Clock

Wherever musik connoiseurs are
to be found ; wherever there is a pub-
lic which is musically inclined; in
whatever spot Eugene Ysaye 'has
appeared there is but a single opin-
ion,' that the Belgian musician is the,
master violinist of the world. Some
experts, whose judgment is founded
on' that calmness of mind that in-
spires profound respect for their
opinion, assert that it is a serious
,question if there ever lived a violin
tYr-~ho was Ysaye's equal.
3.rts.t dem t e ruti e h
mandunu.ifcd r pmt f r
is te pe teclv atur-A dvelomen
an4 t C'ar1., -rtig upo i fts oJ h l i

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1917

"THE PADEREWSKI OF
WOMEN PIANISTS
MONDAY, DECEMBER 10, '17
8:00 o'Clock
Leginska, the pianistic mar-
vel, stands alone as a master
interpreter, of rare intelligence
and unbounded charm. Deli-
cacy and taste, personality and
temperament, coupled with un-
usual creative idealism stamp
this, remarkable Leschetizky
pupil as the foremost woman
pianist of the day.
Technique is one of the nec-
essary attributes of a great pian-
ist virtuoso, but it is no mere
display of digital dexterity
1 . 'l a nt he, . ofLam-
gis-.N r is t Z. 4c C"-L
producer of ~~ieatoutsy

THE NEW YORK SYMPH-
ONY ORCHESTRA
WALTER~ DAMROSCH, Conductor
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1918
8:00 o'Clock
The Symphony Society of New
York is nearly forty years old and
it has had but two conductors, Dr.;
Leopold Damrosch, the founder,
and his son, Walter Damrosch, the
present conductor.
Dr.. Leopold Damosch was, a
musician of European fame, but was
destined to find in the New World
his field of widest activity. The
Symphony Society was organized.
by him in 1878 and im~mediately
took a leading place in the' musical
Ile ,;.f1\New York
Waltr Darosc ~asb-uttwen
ty- Veihe e.c 'dhsft'
er :nducor a d 'e finsel
enavliui dp iai ulfe

By the matchless beauty of her art
through a per~onality that reflects sincerity
and lovablene s, Julia Culp, the renowned
Dutch lieder snger, has won the profound
regard of the discriminating musical public~
of America. Connoisseurs of artistic singing
have declared t;,at not since the days when
Lilli Lehmann vas in her primne have they
heard such beautiful and lofty interpreta-\
tions of the clasical art songs as Madame
'Culp presents at p1er recitals. "Julia Culp,"
they aver, "is ina class by herself." Pos-
sessing extraordiiary versatility, she sounds
the gamut of emotions and she does it all
without a trace o' affection or' exaggeration,
lSavng er ear' ulited and lon ing _to
herhraan.Peei1omtigi h
.imbE. of Julia (ulp's, }\ voice. thUat'A. suggesi5.!"ts
eterl. ? spr :fig, s- . ;3e hing th''at rC ips ad
octoihe i p rtck.i.tasintel--lgen ama
teof! i ls ihsatiTog e

8:00 o'Clock

JULIA CULP
ICI SONG .RECITAL
FRIDMY,.FEBRUARY 15, 1918

Coe'icke tS 1may" be ot reredbymail .1w'-"-andwl eludi d
ti t,$.0,$5,$.0cad Ticketsnot akenby m il il e a C
Oi ,l.t ilAudi._'?!toium " a :. oow:s at8 c iok .i i " in te orings.

Wenesday, c) 10 ; nge !% ccet 'k ,s We sday, Oc.t. 1,U1 3 P. o M.,j

A dress9all Mail Ord, -rs ito CHARLES A. SNK. erear:.SHO OF Msic

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' :;= '32' :aa7 n:'.i;21di_. itT'4 ': , ;r: tui " r so.F:s®9.,Ydl e? . 7i:+61YSed&ticety F. a1.s'Y.e I..L .u ku . '! 9E::,,. ^ _,_:Szs . en . " ;, xti ww ,. :a_ S "y7w:.: d 0c ; ".r.TASi Ti , ._r:+.p t: w, r'r dF.tt4 klY' ^ : t. . zIIYrC

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