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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r ,

PAW

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17, 1918.

r-

ON 28

WINDOWS PAINTED WITH
'WARNING INSCRIPTIONS

ANNOUNCE COMMITTEES
FOR COMEDY CLUB PLAY

bor residents and one
y were among the list
:men who were given
the University by the
is at their last meeting,

those who re-
vs: Graduate
;ineering, Mar-
rbor; M. of S.,
Ann Arbor;
Lansing: mas-

Mary

Mac-

College-Bachelor of Arts,
le, Milford; Robert Loomis,
0.; Leroy Powell, Grand
of science-Charles Roche,
bachelor of science (for-
e P. Brown, Chicago, Ill.;
ass, Ansinia, Ariz.;( chem-
rge F. Smith, Columbus, O.
ring college - Engineering
Darold Scoville, Hudson;
al), Byron Breckenridge,
Ont.,; Norman , Ibsen
Ill.; (electrical), Fritz G.
Schmalkaiden, Germany;
, Ralph McGee, Marietta,
1 architecture and marine
g), Edward Murphy, Cleve-
ool-Juris Doctor, Harry J.
3rayling; Harrison McCar-
nia, 0.
r of laws, Robert Allen, De-
'ard Butler, Arion, Ia. ;
Harlon, Hudson; Avery K.
t has Vegas, N. M.; Thur-
Dormick, Joplin, Mo.; James.
Oklahoma City, Okla.; and,
idolph, Canton, S. D.

MERCHANTS FIND STORE FRONTS
SMEARED IN' GLARING
YELLOW
Vigilantes, said to be seven in num-
ber and including a county official,
Monday night decorated the windows
of business places and offices of six
prominent Ann Arbor people with
skulls and cross bones, and other
warning inscriptions, all executed on
a generous scale in paint of glaring
yellow. It is said to have been ap-
plied between the hours of midnight
and one o'clock, while policemen were
elsewhere on their beats.
Windows decorated were those of1
J: F. Wuerth, proprietor of the Or-'
pheum theater; 0. F. Blaess, coal
dealer 0. Dietz, liquor dealer,
Fred Schmidt, saloon keeper;
Dr. Anna Dieterle, physician, and I
Michael Gauss, shoe dealer. The paint
was removed early before many peo-
ple saw it.
Michael Gauss is said to be very ac-
tive in local Red Cross and Liberty
Loan activities, and to have a son in
France who volunteered, not being of
draft age.
No action has been taken by authori-
ties, although Mayor Ernst M. Wurs-
ter yesterday issued a proclamation
calling -attention to the request of
Governor Sleeper to avoid mod rule,
and rebuking the participators in Mon-
day night's affair.
STUDENTS SET FIRE TO FORTY
ACRES OF TIMBER ON HURON,

INDICATIONS POINT
TICKETS BEING
BY FRIDAY

Committees and their chairmen for
the Comedy club production of "Miss
Hobbs," Friday night, at the Majestic
theater were announced yesterday by
Walter S. Riess, '20, general manager.
Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, is master of
properties, assisted by D. Knight Mer-
rielees, '20M, Morrison Scofield, '20.
and William Leitzinger,.'20. William
P. Fortune, '20, heads the ticket com-
mittee with Ralph E. Gault, '19, Clar-
ence Roeser, '19, William Leitzinger,
'20, John Cary, '19, Mark Ehlbert, '20,
Hobart Smith, '20E, Harold Josey,
'20E; Robert Grindley, '21E, Vincent
Riorden, '20, Dewey Fagerburg, '20,
Vera Brown, '18, Francis Handibo, '1$,
Mildred C. Mighell, '18, Helen Christ-
en, '19, and Harry Hause, '20, as as-
sistants. The program committee con-
sists of Staurt Sonne, '19, chairman,
and Kenneth Relyes, '21, and William
Wachs, '21. Arthur J. Adams, '18, is
stage manager and Russell Barnes,
'20, chairman of publicity.
Reports of the ticket committee
members yesterday indicate that all of
the tickets will be taken before Fri-
day night, and those contemplating at-
tending are urged to buy immediately
as the capacity of the Majestic theater
is limited and only enough tickets will
be sold to guarantee a full house.
25 )lembers Go on
CSmopolitan Trip

TO
SOLD

ALL

A committee consisting of A. B.
Livingston, 18E, S. C. Zylstra, '19 E,
and J. L. Boyd, '18H, were appointed
to take charge of the annual all cam-
pus election. Officers for the Union
and Student's Christian association;
members of the Student council, and
of the engineering honor committee,
and athletic managers are elected at
this time.
T. W. Thomas, '18L, and R. E. Gault,
'19 were appointed on the swing-out
committee.
PASHA, PROPAGANDIST,
EXECUTED AT VICENNES

COUNCIL PLANS FOR
PUSH BALL CONTEST
Chairman James I. McClintock, '19,
of the spring games committee, re-
ported last evening at the meeting of
the Student council that the commit-
tee had -in mind a substitute for the
push ball contest and would give a
full report at the meeting next Tues-
day evening. Any student having a
suggestion for a game is asked to
turn it in before that time. Good
ideas will be given due consi-
deration according to President P
C. A. Hart, '18E, and are greatly
needed.

C.

,p

CAMP

* P
* C

ampus total

I' * *

,I

1'. - .

WAS LEADER IN EFFORT TO MAKE
DEPRESSION AMONG FRENCH
BY NEWSPAPERS
Paris, April 16.-Bolo Pasha was ex-
ecuted at Vincennes.,

DNS TO SPEED
NT OF TROOPS,
WAR KEEPS MUM
G CONDITIONS
G ALLIES
pril 16. - Secretary
o his desk in the war
ght from his trip
to concentrate every
liting the movement
ting men to France.
little to say for pub-

Forty acres of the Edison company'
woods on the west bank of the Huron
river were burned last Sunday by a
fire started by two students. The fire
burnt out all of the undergrowth,
killing many young trees without do-
ing much damage, however, to the
older trees. Two other students say
they saw two persons, whom they later
recognized as students, spread' the
fire through the woods by means of
lighted brush. Later it is said, the
same two rowed to the other side of
the river and started another fire but
it was put out and the two students
were warned against doing it again.
Prof. L. J. Young, who has super-
vision of the Forestry farm and the
Edison company's wooded lands
around Ann Arbor, stated-that the
names of the students who started the
fire are known but will not be made
public until it is decided what action
will be taken against them.
"This is the fourth fire which has
occured in near by wood lots this
spring," said Professor Young, "and
drastic action must be taken to stop
it. The other fires were thought to
have been started accidentally, but
after the discovery in connection with
last Sunday's fire we are suspicious
of the origin of the former ones." )
SENIOR ENGINEERING CLASSES
GO TO CAMP CUSTER TOMORROW

Bolo Pasha's case was defir
but one of a series of inter-rels
cidents in the German effort to

be the princi
ing will be s
drive will be
The camp
among the fa
tinued yesterc

as
in-

have been many reports that
er went to Europe for the
of urging unification of all
mies under a single com-

the.

le The prompt action of General Per-
n shing in placing his men at General
e Foch's disposal is known to have
t met with Mr. Baker's approval.
During his trip Mr. Baker visited
t England, France and Italy and saw
the battle fronts all along the line.
He has been in the American front line
trenches under fire.
Mr. Baker sailed for Europe on an
e American cruiser and returned on a
t. famousliner formerly German but now
t an American transport.
n STEEL BEAMS PLACED ON ROOF
OF LIBRARY DURING VACATION
s -
Have you noticed the increase in
t the size of the new Library? While
4.
t you were at home enjoying the be-}
ginning of real spring weather, be-I
tween 60 and 70 men were completing
the work of installing the steel beams
in the roof of the new building.
About 150 tons of steel were put
into place, during the vacation and
the week preceding it, according to
S estimates made by the contractors.
Concrete work on the-1ourth floor
t was also practical1 finished. This
, completes the concrete work for the
I whole building, except for a little yet
d to be done on the roof. Bricks for the
outer walls of the building have been
laid up to the second floor.
n Prof. Sadler Talks to Fresh Engineers
Marine' engineering as it is taught
at the University, will be the subject
- of a talk by Prof. H. C. Sadler before'
y the freshman engineers at their as-
- sembly at 11 o'clock this morning in
room 348 of the Engineering building.
e Professor Sadler's talk is one of a
s series arranged by Prof. Howard B.
a Merrick of the engineering college,
to bring before the freshman engin-
i eers the different courses presented in
r the college before the time arrives
fnr them to decide which branch of

Practically all of the senior class-'
es in civil, mechanical and electrical
engineering are to leave Ann Arborl
early tomorrow morning for a two-
days' stay at Camp Custer as guests
of the 310th engineers and their com-
mander, Col. W. G. Caples. One hun-,
dred engineers will make the trip,
with six architects and about 30 mem-
bers of the engineering faculty.
The party will leave on a special
train over the Michigan Central at
5:34 o'clock tomorrow morning, arriv-
ing in Camp Custer at 8:25 o'clock-.
returning, the train will leave the
camp at 7:25 o'clock Friday night,
ariving in Ann Arbor about 10:30
o'clock.
Colonel Caples has planned a review
for the entertainment of the 'party
of all troops with sufficient experience
and equipment to take part. It is e-
timated that this will mean about
10,000 men. A sham battle may also
forfm a part of tie program.
Electrical engineers in the group
are to be the especial guests of the
men of the signal 'corps stationed at
the camp.
Rifle Range Damaged During Vacation
The R. O. T. C. rifle range south of
the city was damaged to the extent of
several hundred dollars during vaca-
tion, and it is believed that it is the
work of German sympathizers who
wished to cripple the the work of the

More than 10 nationalities were
represented on the annual spring trip
of the Cosmopolitan club this year.
About 25 members left Ann Arbor
Tuesday morning, April 9, for Detroit,
the first stop, where they visited the
Burrows Adding Machine plant and
the Parke Davis Co., chemical manu-
facturers. The club was entertained
at luncheon by' the former concern,
and while in Detroit stopped at the
Hotel Wayne.
Flint was visited Wednesday and a
tour was made of the Chevrolet, Dort,
and Buick automobile plants. The
party left Wednesday night for Sagi-
naw. Here they were entertained by
the Board of Commerce, and. were
present for the opening of the Liberty
Loan drive on Thursday. On this oc-
casion, Douglas Fairbanks spoke and
the Great Lakes jackies' band played.
In the morning, the boys donned
miners' togs and went down into the
Consolidated coal mines, and in th
afternoon they visited the Saginaw
Plate Glass Co., and the Jackson,
Church,-Wilcox Co., manufacturers of
automobile parts.
Visits were made to the Herzog Art
Furniture factory, the Michigan Blind
institute and the public school Fri-
day morning, and in the afternoon the
company left for Ann Arbor, arriving
here Friday evening. The visit of the
party to Saginaw was the subject of
an interesting editorial appearing in
one of that city's daily papers.
TO TELL TRUTH IS TO LIE MR.
BACHRACH TELLS JOURNALISTS
"The only way to tell the truth is to
lie," said Mr. A. C. Bachrach, instruc-
tor in ordnance, yesterday in his lec-
ture on "It Never Happened at All"
to students of journalism.
"This brings up the interesting par-
adox that unless a man correctly re-
produces his emotions or his reactions
to an event he is lying just as surely
as if he juggled facts.'
Mr. Bachrach went on to state that
in his estimation the journalist was a
true artist, for it is the function of
the newspaper man to help the aver-
age man to better interpret his ex-
perience.
"I demand that art help me, just as
food and drink help me in my attempt
to find a adequate life, and this is why
I believe that the newspaper is to be
classed with the highest of all artis-
tic productions since it affects the
lives of so many millions in such a
profound way.
"Artists must ,see relations between
facts that the average man does not
see and this is all we get from the
masters in all-artistic fields."

ize a propoganda of depression and dis- the:tal auJ
the total facull
couragement among the civilian lead- 250. The comi
ers and soldiers of France. These in- campus go fa
volved Joseph Caillaux, a former the opening of
premier of France, one or more mem- University to
bers of the French chamber of depu- The ir
ties, and several French newspapers. the city at a m
The newspapers were alleged to have air meeting to
been subsidized by German money tos tomorro
spread abroad in France a spirit of third Liberty
ident Harry B.
"defeatism," a belief that there was no sity will head
hope of beating Germany and thatbs ay, ill ed
France should make haste to accept in the march
the best terms possible. been made toh
Tried to Corrupt Press companies, the
Bolo Pasha, himself, was said to course,and th
have had the use of a fund of $1,683,- are training he
000, chiefly if not wholly, to corrupt ings of the ev
the French press. The line of m
Pasha's activities possess peculiar the Varsity ba
interest to Americans because of the lowed by the
fact that, of the funds at his disposal, University. I
it is charged that a large sum was campus repres
transferred from the Deutsche bank in stratson will c
Berlin to France by way of New York. city's home gua
It was a result of discovery of his itary and civ
mainipulation of this fund through paraders will
five New York banks or banking tions of the ci
houses that Attorney-General Merton tire procession
E. Lewis of New York state was able are procssor

to obtain information which was for-
warded to the French ambassador in
Washington, M. Jesserand, upon which
Bolo was arrested.
Protests Innocence
The French government started
Pasha's trial on February 4. Bolo
loudly asserted his innocence and even
wrote a letter to Premier Painleve
asking him to "finish the affair," de-
claring that he had been tortured for
eight months and that nothing had
been found against him. He was found
guilty and sentenced to be executed.
His execution marks the end of "Bolo-
ism" in France.
To Explain Pathfinders' Club
Mr J. F. Wright, president of the
Detroit branch of the Pathfinders'
club of America. Will lecture to the
Ann Arbor section of that organiza-
tion at 8 o'clock Monday night in the
Bible Chair house at 444 South State
street.
The Pathfinder club is interested in
prison and reformatory work, haying
in addition to its clubs in Detroit and
Ann Arbor, 27 inside branches located
in such institutions throughout the
country. The club in the Michigan
state prison at Jackson has a mem-
bership of 56'0.
All Students and townspeople who
are interested in work of this nature
are asked to attend the meeting.

parade a
while Pr

the c

Huror

Pla
of t

on tne can
the Mortar
women's hi
organizatic
volunteer
have two h

PROF.

Pro
Pr(

me Not to Meet
T.' Crane of the

Is

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