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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 16, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, Al

Walk-Over
pring Pumps and Oxfords

FOR WOMEN
A wonderful assort-
ent of styles and pat-

Pump shown in the
cut is one of our many
:istinctive styles and car-
ies the popular military
heel, long thin vamp and
small narrow silk bow,
naking a smart tailored effect.

Ua
Unusual value at $5.50.

Ann Arbor Talk
During Vacation
Friday, April 5
Work is commenced on a large elec-
tric sign on the court house lawn. The
sign will be used in the interest of the
third Liberty Loan drive.
Approximately 125 high school stu-
dents failed to sign the pledge of al-
legiance to the federal government
which was presented to them at the
regular school assembly.
Saturday, April 6
Ann Arbor opened its big Liberty
Loan drive. The first subschiption
was for $1,100 from the Bethlehem
German Evangelical Lutheran church
and the Bethlehem Brotherhood.
Dr. C. G. Parnall, health officer of
Jackson, was elected medical super--
intendent and director of the Univer-
sity hospital. The appointment be-
comes effiective July 1.
Sunday, April 7
Charles T. Wood, 28 years of age,
a student in the ordnance course,

* "The Brat," at the Garrick.

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I:

"Pollyanna," at the Whitney,
Saturday, matinee and night.
TODAY
Majestic-"The Unbeliever."
Wuerth-Charles Ray in "The
Hired Man." Also "The Eagle's
Eye."
Orpheum - Mme. Petrova in
"The Exile." Also "The Eagle's
Eye."

AT TH E THEATERS

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Norma Talmadge Is appearing at the
Arcade today and tomorrow in "The;
Ghosts of Yesterday." The play is
adapted from the novel by Rupert
Hughes entitled "Two Women." Sev-
eral plays by this author have been
adapted for screen presentation, and
Miss Talmadge appears to advantage
in her role in this piece.
THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY SCHOOL
offers the following courses in libra-

AT THE ARCADE

rianship for the year 1918-1919:
General Library Work.
Library Work with Children.
School Library Work.
The entrance examinations will
held Saturday, June 22 at 9:00 A.

be
M.

Walk-Over Boot Shop.
R. J. Hoffstetter, Prop.
115 S. Main St. I

Arcade -
"The Ghosts
Pathe News.

Norma Talmadge in
of Yesterday." Also

Rae - Irene Fenwick in "The
Sin Woman."

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

- died from empyema at the University
hospital. The body was taken to Lan-
Students of the University of Michigan sing. Monday,April
should inspect our new line of very smart models in James M. Gilmartin, '20L married
Florence Dupslaff at the Bethlehem
Lutheran church. Mr. Gilmartin's
Young Men s Top-coats home is in Oakland, Cal.
A company of the national army
Young Men s Gabardines from Camp Custer were tendered a
dance at the Armory. They were also
Y oung M en's Suits entertained by the city Y. M. C. A. and
by the Y. M. C. A. Ladies' auxiliary.
Finely tailored garments every one of them. Fashions Tuesday, April 9
latest ideas. We advise early inspection. President Harry B. Hutchins speaks
at a luncheon given by the Liberty
_ _ _7_ _Loan workers at the Y. M. C. A.
- The State Savings Bank subscribed
to $100,000 worth of bonds..
Thursday, April 11
Lieutenant Denby of the United
.at a Plate of Ice Cream every Day States marine corps formerly con-
gressman Denby, delivered a lecture
at the Whitney theater.
Prof. A. G. Hall, chairman of the
17 ddlft excutive committee of the high school,
stated that each teacher would be re-
quired to give certificate and a pledge
of loyalty next year.
Saturday, April 13
Leo Kress of the 329th Artillery -at
Camp Custer addressed the Liberty
I9004ft Cdogm AL o an w o rk ers at lu n ch eo n at th e
. M. C. A.

ARCAD E
SHOWS AT 3:00o, 6:30, 8:00, ):30
x5c Unless Otherwise Specified.
Tue Wed 16-1--Norma 'ralmadge in
rThe Ghosts of Yeste.rday" and
(Tues.) Pathe News, (Wed.) Mutt
& Jeff Cartoon, "In the Circus." 0oc
( rlor-FIri-: 8- i-Mabel Northn ! din "The
Floor Below" and Christie Comedy,
*One Good Turn." loc.
Sat-20-ConStianc Talma^dge in "The
t 2Honeymoon"e (1et.) and Cartoon,
"The Mysterious Yarn.

in the Carnegie Library of Pittsburg,
Schenley Park, Pittsburg, Pa. Grad-
uates of universities and colleges with
a recognized high standard may be
admitted without examinations. For
further information, address the Prin-
cipal, Carnegie Library School, Carne-
gie Institute, Pittsburg, Pa.
Nights:- Pop.Mats.
25c to $2.00 A R 4 i Wed.and Sat.
20,0 Orchestra j
Seats $150r DETROIT Best Seats $1
Oliver Morosco will present
"TH E BRAT"
By and With MAUDE FULTON
Wuerth Theatre i
Matinees-2:00, 3:30
Evenings-6:30, 8:0o, 9:30
...Phone-x 6o- J
Prices:-Matinees i5s; Evenings aoc
We Pay the Tax
BOOKINGS FOR APRIL ..
Tues-Wed-16-17-Charles Ray in "The ;
Hired Man." Also "Eagle Eye,"
No. 6.
- Thur-Fri - x8-19 - George Beban in
"Jules of the Strong Heart." Also
Keystone Comedy, "Wronged by a
-. Mistake."
- Sat-2o-William Russell in "The Mid-
- night Trail." Weekly No, 22. Corm
- edy, "rhe Flirt."=
- Sun-Mon-21-22-W. S. Hart in "The
Silent Man." Also Son of Democ-
racy, No. s, "Tender Memories."
'Tues-«ed-23-24-Elizabeth Risdon in
"Mother." Also "Eagle :Eye," No. 7.
OrpheumTheatre
Matinees-- : oo, 3:30o
Evenings-6:3o 8:o, 9:30
Phone-16o-J
Prices: "-
Mat. roc; Eve. i5c; Children Sc
No Tax
BOOKINGS FOR APRIL
Tues-16-Mme. Petrova in "The
Exile." Also "Eagle Eye," No. 6.
S (Ret.)"
Wed-x '7-George M. Cohen in "Sevens=
Keys to Baldpte," Also "Eagle
Eye," No. 6. (Ret.)
Thur-Fri-,i8-x9- Alma Reubens in
"The Answer." Also Comedy,_
"Caught With the Goods."=
Sat-2o-Frank Keenan in "loaded
Dice." Also Weekly and Comedy. =
Sun-Man-21-22-Bessie Barriscale in
"Madam Who," in 7 Parts.
I (1011i111101ii1 II 1111I01I1II 1011flh1flhIIIIIII i
.1

AT THE WHITNEY

"Pollyanna," the "glad girl," is com-
ing to the Whitney on Saturday,
April 20, matinee and night. The play,
as a comedy, adds to the good cheer
message sent around the world by
Eleanor H. Porter's optimistic -stories
upon which it was founded. datherine
Chisholm Cushing, the dramatist, is
expert at comedy construction. Her
"A Widow by Proxy," "The Real
Thing," "Kitty McKay," and "Jerry,"
were all very successful.
Optimism is the keynote of the play,
and surely it was never more needed
than at the present time. "Pollyanna,"
will be seen here in a company head-
ed by Helen Hayes, the 17-year-old
star who has recently become popular.
The supporting cast includes George
Alison, John Webster, Fanchon Camp-
bell, Agnes Gildea, Adrian Morgan,
Master Donald McLelland, and others.

t

A HAT

/,

CLEANED AND REBLUCKED
with a new band
LOOKS LIKE NEW
Saves $2.00 or $3.00
FACTORY BAT STORE
617 Packard St., next to the Delta
Telephone 1792

AT THE MAJESTIC

D~elicious,

Refreshing, Nourishing

WHATS GOING ON

I

GET YOUR
Text Books and Supplies

TODAY
2 o'clock-Mr. A. C. Bachrach
speaks in room 441 Natural Science
building, on "It Never Happened at
All."

"The Unbeliever," probably the best
picture of the modern war ever seen
in Ann Arbor, is being shown at the
Majestic again today and tomorrow.
The picture is based upon the novel-
ette, "The Three Things," by Mary
Raymond Shipman Andrews, and it
tells the story of a young American
aristocrat who enlisted in the United
States marine corps and was sent to
Belgium and placed in the front line
trenches. He is wounded and sent
home after a series of adventures in
which he finds the girl he loves, an
ideal democracy, and what proves to.
be a satisfactory form of religion.
The piece is intensely dramatic and
is filled with exciting scenes in the
trenches and on the battlefield. Mar-
guerite Courtot and Raymond McKay
play the leading roles, and they are
supported by Kate Lester, Frank de
Vernon, Eugene Harbrok, Mortimer
Martini, and a large number of others.
This picture has just completed a five
weeks' run in the Majestic theater in
Detroit.

WHITNEY THEATRE
SATURDAY APRIL 20 Mat. and Night
Kaw & tanger and GeorgeC.Tyier
Present
The Glad PJly
. 4
BY CATHEnINE CWIMSHOLM GuSHING
Naed on the book*of theSame Name byEleanor H.Potte
AComdforrwIps ThatYougr01koEnjo
Prices: Mat. 25-50-75-$1. Nights 50-75-1-$1.50
SEAT SALE THURSDAY MORNING

From the "Store with the College Spirit" 4:15 o'clock-Prof. H. E.. Riggs
speaks in Barbour gymnasium on
"Transportation."
Sheehan' & & Co 7 o'clock-Zoological Journal club
meets in room 231, Zoological labor-
Ann Arbor Detroit atory.
..____ 7:00 o'clock-Regular meeting of
the Student Council at the Michigan
ECONOMIC WAR WITH GERMANY tic government was allowed to live. Union.
WOULD MAKE PEACE LIKELY "It would seem as though the time
-- had come," continues the review, TOMORROW
New York, April 15.-That the "for the chamber of commerce of the 8 o'clock--Prof. Herbert R. Cross
threat of economic pressure be ap- United States to enforce its resolu- speaks in room A, Alumni Memorial
plied to Germany to force an early tion, to bring to bear upon congress building, on " The German Destruc-
the strongest pressure exerted tion of Works of Art in Belgium,
peace, is the statement made in this g' France, and Italy."
through the chamber's wide and~power-FrneadItl"
week's Bache Review, the New York J ful business membership for the pas-
financial journal. Lord Sydenham sage of a law making effective by. U-NOTICES
proposes the expedient of an an- proclamation the penalty suggested The cast of "L'Avocat Patelin" will
nouncement to the effect that if the by Lord Sydenham, whether or not it rehearse at 7:15 o'clock tonight in
German government, within a fixed affects the action of the military Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Rehear-'
period, does not agree to suspend powers in Germany or of the German sal for "Le Retour Imprevu" will be
hostilities and to negotiate for peace masses. It is only just that the Ger- held at 8:30 o'clock in the same
on the terms laid down by President man nation should be punished for place.
Wilson, then for every week that the the bloody program which it has All discussion group leaders are
war is prolonged, no German vessel forced upon the whole world." asked to meet at 6:45 o'clock tonight
shall enter or leave any American 1_at 444 South State street.
port, including the Panama )canal, FACULTY OYERSIUBSCRIBES
for one year. "This decree," says Lord . unth V um'Trlv T T An(T ;FR E CST
LIIJAJ LII~jAY JJAN~1 U lY FCRCEFAV

MAJESTIC -

TODAY
APRIL 1$ AND
WEDNESDAY

Direct from a Five Weeks Run at the Majestic Theatre, Detroit
THE WONDERFUL PHOTOPLAY SUCCESS

"THE

I

Sydenham, "should be fixed and ir-
revocable, whatever the course the
war in Eupore may take."
The chamber of commerce of the{
United States has sent out referen-
dum to the various business men of
the country, on a proposal of this
nature. and most of the responses in-;
dicate that business men as a whole+
think that the proposal is not only
a sound one, but that it would be an+
inevitable policy on the part of thea
United States if the German autocra-+
Kodaks at Att
I am constantly taking Used
Kodaks, and, although we have use
partment, we offer many of them a'
Now is the time to get your Kod
the summer. Bring it to me for adji

THIRD LIB1EUT1 LV.P QU'U# PASO ECEFACI
(Continued from. Page One) Souvenir editions of "Le Retou Im-
committee last night was to the ef- pervu" and "L'Avocat . Patelin," the
fect that Ann Arbor subscribed $544,- plays selected for presentation by the
000 to the loan, filling 63 per cent of Cercle Francais on April 25, appear-
her quota. The county has already ed on the campus during the spring
raised $1,026,000, or 68 per cent ofher recess and are now on sale at all the
quota. The county committee is meet- bookstores.
ing every afternoon at the city Y. M. This little volume, edited by Prof.
C. A., where the means of cam- A.' G. Canfield, of the French depart-
paigning for the Loan are being dis- ment, and printed by the Ann Arbor
cussed at daily luncheons. Press, contains 99 pages in addition
to the separately bound vocabulary
which is included with each edition.
Buff papernhasbeen used throughout.
ractive Announcement of the casts of both
plays is made in the souvenirs..
All French classes in the Univer-
sity, with the possible exception of
those for beginners, will devote a
for all of them in our Rental De- short time to the study of this volume.
t much less than their real value. In the more elementary classes this
.ak ut nd aveit ut n oderfor study will be undertaken to familiar-
ak out and have it put in order for ize the students with the plays in
ustment and cleaning, order to contribute to their under-
standing of them when performed.
The advanced classes will aim to de-
6, 719 No. University Ave. velop an appreciation of the dramas
-from a literary standpoint.

UNBELIEVER"
An EDISON SUPER-FEATURE based upon the book "THE
THREE THINGS", the greatest story the war has produced by
MARY RAYMOND SHIPMAN ANDREWS

FEATURING

RAYMOND McKEE and
MARGUERITE COURTOT
Produced in co-operation with the UNITED STATES MARINE
CORPS. A strong story of romance and action
SPECIAL MUSIC BY AN 8-PIECE ORCHESTRA

SHOWS
matinees at.........................3:00
Nights at ............... . .....7:30-9:00

SEATS
Matinees........ain Floor 25c; Balcony 15e
Nights...... .ain Floor 50c; Balcony 25c, 85c
War Tax Not Included -

, PHOTOGRAPHEI

IT

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