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April 16, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-16

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)FF WITH A BANG!

BUY YOUR THIRD LIBERTY LOAN BONDS TODAY

t

THE WEATHERI
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAI

r .Sijr~tl

~AaitJ

ASWSOCI ATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHIT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXVIII. No. 13. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS

HEAVY ONSLAUHT
AGINST BAILLEUL

ARTILLERY DISPLAY INCREASES
IN GIVENCHY SECTOR,
SAYS RAID

HUNS
ON

GAIN FOOTHOLD
MESSINES RIDGE

Mysterious Plot in Frague to Create
German Government There,
States Report
BULLETIN
With the British army in France,
April 15.- Another attack on Bail.
leul appeared to be boiling today, fol-
lowing the recapure by the Neuve
Eglise by the Germans last night.
Hard fighting was proceeding in this
sector, but up to the tm of filing this
dispatch (2 o'clock in the afternoon)
the enemy had not begun the big on-
slaught which was expected.
London, April 15. - Bailleul and
Wulverghem were the central points
of the heavy fighting today between the
British and Germans in Flanders, for
the artillery display increased in ac-
tivity in the sector between Givenchy
and Robecq, according to a report from
Field-Marshal Haig headquarters.
(By Associated Press)
After seven days after the Germans
launched their gigantic assaults be-
tween Ypres and Lens, the momentum
of their attack has been broken and
the waves of the Teutonic forces are
recoiling before the wrath of the Brit-
ish defense. While the Germans have
made gains of ground and have driven
west into the Allied lines, they seem-
ed to have failed in their attempt to
break through.
Neuve Eglise Captured
During the last day there have been
bitterly fought engagements at four
places, all at the northern side of the
salient southwest of.Ypres. Seven as-
saults against the British trenches
have been hurled back by the British.
Neuve Eglise on the south of Messines
ridge has been taken by the ,Germans.
The British have retired at some
places, but it is expected that they
will organize for a counter attack to
force the Germans out of the town.
It has been a plan of the Germans to
strike hard at some particular sectors
and if that blow was carried to turn
powerfully against some new point.
This proceedure will probably be
tried in the assault of Arras. It may
be that the static fighting south of
Albert may mark the beginning of an
attempt to sweep westward toward
Amiens.
German troops have entered Hel-
singfors, the Finish capital.
Yanks Stand Firm
American forces near Toul are
standing firm before heavy attacks of
the Germans and have held their lind
intact in spite of all the weight of
men and metal the enemy has turned
against them.
Coincident with the report of the
resignation of Count Czernin, the Aus-
tro-Hungarian foreign minister, comes
the report of a mysterious plot in
Prague to attempt the creation of a
German government there.
NON-RESIDENT CITIZENS MAY
TAKE CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS
Washington, April 15.-Civil service
examinations may now be taken wher-
ever they are given, by a new ruling
of congress. Formerly the examina-
tions were given in the state of resid-
ence of the applicant, but for the per-
iod of the war this restriction has been
removed.
Thechange has been made to make
it easier to obtain positions in Wash-
ington. Competent stenographers,
typists, and bookkeepers are in great
demand, and the government hopes
that a greater number of applicants
will apply for examination, one of
which is held every week throughout

the country.
* * ** * * * * * * * *
*- *

MISS EVANS GIVEN
LEAVE OF ABSENCE
Leave, of absence for a year was
granted Miss Alice Evans, head of
the department of physical education
for women, by the Board of Regents
at their last meeting. Miss Evans ex-
pects to go to Boston this summer to
take a two-months course in ortho-
pedic muscular work at the end of
which time she will be qualified for
reconstruction service overseas, in
connection with the army medical
corps. Although Miss Evans, after
the completion of the course, will pos-
sibly be retained for service in this
country, she hopes to be sent abroad.
The work of the department will be
carried on by the Instructors, Miss
Marion Wood and Miss Marion Daw-
ley, assisted by students in the office
and in all branches of outdoor and
indoor sports.
PROFI-BTES TO ESUME
POSITION S LAW DEANI
ANNOUNCEMENT OF HIS RETURN
MADE AT MEETING OF
REGENTS
Prof. Henry Moore Bates, formerly
Dean of the Law department, now
professor of law at Harvard univer-
sity, will return to the University next
fall to resume the position of Dean of
the Law School, according to an an-
nouncement made at the Regents'
meeting April 5. It is understood
Harvard offered every inducement to
keep Professor Bates there, but he
preferred to return to Michigan.
Subscribe to Liberty Loan
The Regents voted to buy $50,000
worth of Liberty bonds of the third
issue. It was stipulated that $25,000
might be used to buy bonds of the
first and second issues from faculty
members, if the sellers would agree
to spend two dollars for bonds of
the present issue, for every dollar's
worth purchased by the Regents.
A unit of the new hospital, for
which the last legislature appropria-
ted $150,000, is to be built immediately
and will cost in the neighborhood of
$30,000.
New Course Planned for Summer
A course in Liberty motor constrc-
tion and operation will be offered in
the summer session if 12 students ap-
ply for it.
Several collections, including pic-
tures for the art collection, instru-
ments for the Sterns musical collec-
tion, and pictures and manuscripts
of former President Angell, were ac-
cepted by the Regents.
CHANGES MADE IN SHOP-WORK
SCHEDULES FOR ENGINEERS
Owing to the use of the Engineering
shops during the daytime by the aero
mechanics sent here by the govern-
ment, the following changes in shop-
work schedules are to take effect to-
day:
Courses 1 and 2, secs. 1 to 5, in-
clusive, formerly meeting from 1 to
5 o'clock on week-day afternoons,
will hereafter meet from 7 to 10 o'-
clock in the evening of the same days
as before. Section 6 of courses 1 and
2 has been cancelled and will be dis-
tributed among sections 1 to 5.
Course 4, sections 1 and 2, formerly
meeting on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thurs-
days, and Fridays, 1 to 5 o'clock, will
meet from 7 to 10 o'clock on the even-

ings of the same days as formerly
scheduled. Section 3 of course 4 has
been cancelled and will be distributed
among sections 1 and 2.
Section 1 of course 3 in pattern
making has been changed from 1 to
5 o'clock Wednesday to 7 to 10 o'clock
the same day, while section 2 will be
divided between Monday and Friday
from 7 to 10 o'clock.
Foundry work will not be affected
by the new arrangement of hours. All
quiz sections will remain unchanged.
Students now enrolled in section 3,
course 4, or section 2, course 3, pat-
tern-making, are requested to report
immediately to their shop instructors
for re-enrollment.
Raise $400,000 for War Chest Fund
South Bend, Ind., April 15.-More
than $400,000 has been subscribed to-
ward the war chest fund being raised
here. The quota asked for is $500,-
000.

YANKSKILL 68IN
FIERCE HUN RAID
Germans Hurl 400 Picked Troops
Against American Stronghold
on Meuse River
TEUTONS ATTEMPT TO DECEIVE
SAMMIES BY TALKING FRENCH!
U. S. Trained Bird Men Rout Five
Machines While Troops Watch;
Down Two Planes
(By Associated Press)
With the American army in France,
April 15. - The German attack on
American positions on the right bank
of the Meuse, north of St. Mihiel yes-
terday, was made by a force of 400
picked troops. Although the Ameri-
cans were outnumbered more than
two to one, they repulsed the enemy.
The known enemy casualties include
69 dead, many wounded and 11 pris-
oneres.
TheGermans attempted to deceive
the Americans by appearing in front
of the trenches and speaking French
and English. The deception was dis-
covered, however, and cost the en-
emy dearly. ,
Several of the wounded enemy were
taken back by their comrades to the
German positions.
Aviators Are Taken
Two German fighting planes were
shot down yesterday inside the Amer-
ican lines by Lieutenants A. S. Win-
slow, Chicago, and Douglas Camp-
bell, California. Each downed one
machine. Both the enemy aviators
were made prisoners. One was slight-
ly wounded.
Falls in Flames
The machines, which formed part of
a patrol of five aircraft. were brought
down after a six-minute engagement.
One of the enemy machines fell in
flames, but the other was only slightly
damaged.
It is believed Lieutenant Campbell
is the first graduate of a strictly Am-
erican school to bring down an enemy
machine.
F. M. ADAMS, '17, PRAISES
LIBRARY OF CAMP MERRITT
In a letter to Mr. Bishop, Univer-
sity librarian, Fred. M. Adams, '17,
tells of the splendid work the library
at Camp Merritt is doing.
"In a very attractive room about the
size of the upper reading room in
your library, home-like furniture,
soft lights, jars of flowers and other
reminders of one's home are found.
The librarian is a chap with a per-
sonality and all the fellows like him.
He gives all of us a choice of two
books to take over with us, which is
a rather clever idea, since most of the
men will have a few weeks of lone-
someness when they get 'Over There.'
"The room was very cheerful to-
day, which proved a rather snowy one,
and, *ith a large fireplace full of
blazing logs, no one can feel lone-
some in such surroundings. This
same room must give service to near-
ly ten thousand men.'
Prof. Riggs Gives Patriotic Address
Prof. Henry E. Riggs, of the depart-
ment of Civil Engineering, will lec-
ture on "Transportation Problems,"
at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. The lecture is
the second of a series of bi-weekly
talks which are being given especially
for the people who are taking up
patriotic education work. Today's

lecture is open to the public and all
interested persons are urged to at-
tend.
175 Smileage Books Sold on Campus
One hundred seventy-five smileage
books were sold on the campus up to
the beginning of the spring vacation,
according to a report from the campus
sales agents.
Smileage books are sold at the of-
fices of Registrar Arthur G. Hall and
the secretary of the Law school, at
the banks on the campus, and at the
post office.
L. H. ANDREWS, '1$D, Marries Nurse
Miss Bertha Looker of Ann Arbor, a
nurse at the University Health Ser-
vice, and LaVerne H. Andrews, '18D,
Ann Arbor, were married last Satur-
day, April 6, in Jackson. They are
making their residence at the home of
the groom's parents, 541 South Divi-
sion avenue.

199 MEN ARRIVE
FOR TRAINING HERE
Drafted men to the number of 199,
mostly from Detroit, arrived yester-
day to begin an eight weeks' course
of training in mechanics, in the en-
gineering shops of the University.
The Board of Regents contracted with
the government a short time ago to
give the instruction, and feed and
house the men. They will be lodged
in five houses around the campus
owned by the University, and fed at
the Union. Headquarters is at 1145
Washtenaw avenue.
Captain Durkee will be at the head
of the detachment, and his assistantst
will be First Lieut. Millbery and Sec- I
ond Lients. Hall and Godfrey. The
work will deal especially with ma-
chines of all kinds, and courses in'
blacksmith and gunsmith work will be
taken by part of the men enrolled.l
Active work begins this morning.'
TICKETS FOR COMEDY
PLAY PLACED- ON RSE
"MISS HOBBS" SUPERIOR TO PRE-1
VIOUS PRODUCTIONS, CLAIM
OFFICIALS
Ticket salesmen under direction of
Walter S. Reiss, '20, start this morn-
ing to reach every student on the
campus with tickets to "Miss Hobbs,"
the Comedy Club play to be presented
Friday evening at the Majestic thea-
ter. Arrangements have neen made to
have the tickets on sale in every fra-
ternity house on the campus, in the
boarding houses, and at prominent
stores.
Director Townsend Pleased With Cast
At the rehearsal last night the cast
demonstrated that it has the play well
in hand, and Director Walter H.
Townsend expressed himself as be-
ing well pleased with the professional
manner in which they put it across.
It moved with a smoothness that be-
speaks much for the talent of the
actors comprising the company.
Superior to Previous Productions
In its entertainment powers, "Miss
Hobbs" is superior to most of the
campus productions of recent years,
Comedy Club officials believe. It is
a pure farce comedy in which amus-
ing situations follow one another with
great rapidity. The players, which
Mr. Townsend has selected to put it
on, have appeared in numerous other
campus productions, and have shown
themselves sufficiently talented to
make the most of the opportunities
the play affords.
It is expected that enough tickets to
exhaust the Majestic's accomodations
will be sold today and tomorrow.
LIBERTY LOAN SUBSCRIPTIONS
REACH TOTAL OF $691,6118,00
Washington, April 15.- The nation
has raised its Liberty Loan pledges
to $691,611,800.
A large proportion of the fund rep-
resents subscriptions by individuals in
comparatively small amounts.
The situation is considered encour-
aging. There is an indication of a
large number of subscribers showing
an equal distribution of the financial
war burden.
In the Minneapolis district, where
the campaign just opened, reports
show that farmers are buying liber-
ally.

Texas Tornado Kill Four Persons
Dallas, Tex., April 15.-At least four
persons are known to have been killed
by a tornado which swept over a
northern Texas county Sunday night.
It demolished homes, barns, and other
buildings, and crippled wire condi-
tions. Many are believed to have been
injured.
H. Burke, 193D, Dies in California
Herbert Burke, '93D, died at his
winter home in San Diego, Cal., April
14. Dr. Burke practiced his profes-
sion in Ann Arbor after his gradua-
tion, till he was compelled to retire
because of ill health. He is survived
by many friends and relatives.
Student Council Meets Tonight
The Student Council will hold its
regular meeting at 7 o'clock tonight
at the Michigan Union. Business
matter will be transacted and all mem-
bers are expected to attend.

FACULTY OVERSUBSCRIBES THIRD LOAN
QUOTA DURING VACATION; STUDENTS
ASKED TO INVEST S45,00O IN BONDS

"Low Shoe Day"
To Save Leather
Leather must be saved, and Ann4
Arbor will start the conservation
movement Sunday, April 21, which has
been designated as "Low Shoe Day."
Economy dictates that high-top
shoes be laid aside until next winter,
and that the oxford again come into,
popularity. Why, ask the leather con-,
servers, wear high-top shoes when ox-1
fords are more comfortable and more,
stylish? This is a useless way of con-;
suming an added amount of leather..,
It is for the sake of economy that
Ann Arbor merchants have set aside
Sunday, April 21, as "Low Shoe Day."
At that time the pedal extremities are
expected to show" their patriotism by
being enclosed in oxfords.
While the observation of the day
will not be enforced by the interven-
tion of Ann Arbor's august police
force or by threats of legal prosecu-
tion, the shoe merchants of the city
are to take all measures in their pow-
er to make "Low Shoe Day" a long-re-
membered occasion. Rumor has it
that special showings of spring styles
are to be employed to impress upon
the pedestrians' minds the advantage
and economy of buying new foot jew-
elry.
STAMP SALE NOT
AFFECTED BY LOAN
The sale of thrift and war savings
stamps in Ann Arbor is continuing at
the normal rate, and was not affected
by the third Liberty Loan drive. The
post office officials are attributing this
to the fact that the people are really
learning to save, and that these "baby
bonds" are being bought by people
who could not afford to invest in
Liberty bond of large denominations.
During the past week the local of-
fice sold 450 war saving stamps, and
5,571 thrift stamps, amounting to $3,-
155.75. During the month of March
there were sold in Ann Arbor 2, 511
war savings and 10,063 thriftrstamps
to the amount of $12,911.29.
MC A00 STOPS EXTRAVAGANT
ADVERTISING OF RAILROADS
Local railroads will be forced to
conform with the order of Director
General McAdoo that all railroad pub-
licity and advertising must hereafter
be limited to imformation needed by
the public.
This order has been directed against
the extravagant advertising railroads
have used in the past in competition
for train service to pleasure and health
resorts. The order also curtails such
forms of -advertising as pictures, cal-
endars, and wall maps.
Time table folders must be standard-
ized, and the distribution carefully
checked to avoid waste. All advertis-
ing of luxurious service and superior
trains has been eliminated. A com-
mitte of passenger agents has been
selected to standardize schedules.
WASHINGTON SPECULATES ON
COUNT CZERNIN'S RESIGNATION
Washington, April 15.-News of the
resignation of Count Czernin, the Aus-
tro-Hungarian -minister, lead to spe-
culation here today as to the causes
which brought about the exit of the
Austrian official. The change is be-
lieved to be due to opinions recently

formed by Czernin who had become
convinced that his moderate views,
regarding the basis for peace, were
unacceptable.
Boston Wins First Game From Phillie
Boston, Mass., April 15.-Ruth held
Philadelphia to four hits in the first
game of the season, Boston winning 7
to 1. Officials said the game was a
success. Attendance about 7,000.
P. R. Rice, '21E, Joins Medical Corps
Paul R. Rice, '21E, has enlisted in
the medical corps of the army, and is
now stationed at Columbus, Ohio.

LARGER SUBSCRIPTIONS SOUGHT
BY COMMITTEE AS SCHOOL
RE-OPENS
STUDENT DRIVE OPENS
- TOMORROW NIGHT
Drive to Be Planned at Meeting of
Team Captains, Lieutenants
and Volunteers
The campus quota for the third Lf4-
erty Loan has been fixed at $125,000
to be raised among the students and
faculty. Of this amount $80,000 is
asked from the members of the facul-
ty, and $45,000 from the students.
With the announcement of the quota
also came the statement that the fac-
ulty figure has been. oversubscribed
during the Easter vacation by the Un-
iversity instructors who were reached
that week. Bonds to the amount of
$80,700 were sold, and the committee
has now set out to raise a still great-
er amount by seeing the other mem-
bers of the faculty who could not be
reached by the campus volunteers dur
ing the vacation week.
Larger Oversubscription Sought
The University committee has set
out to. work with greater zeal for a
larger overubscription with the re-
opening of school, and will make the
sales as heavy as possible. The law
authorizing the third Loan provides
for the sale of $3,000,000,000 in bonds,
plus all oversubscriptions, and the
committee therefore feels that they
must not stop until every man on the
campus has been reached. The ex-
amples set by Detroit and other cities
will be followed in an attempt to
make the campus a 100 per cent sub-
scriber to the Loan.
Student Campaign Opens Tomorrow
The campaign among the students
will officially begin at a meeting of
team captains, lieutenants, and volun-
teers, to be held at 7 o'clock tomor-
row evening in room 101 Economics
building. Plans for the manner of ap-
proaching the students, and the sub-
division of the campus into districts,
will be arranged at that time. A num-
ber of speakers were chosen to ad-
dress the gathering, which will be
made as short and snappy as possible.
The canvass will begin immediately
after the meeting. A complete an-
nouncement of the meeting will be
made tomorrow.
The committee has emphasized the
fact that every one will be seen be-
fore the campaign is over, and that
the people connected with the Uni-
versity should refrain from buying
bonds through the city committeemen
or through the banks. During the sed-
ond Liberty Loan campaign there were
a number of faculty men who sub-
scribed to the Loan through the
banks, thus' making it more difficult
for the campus committee to reach
the quota.
Regents Subscribe $50,000
The Board of Regents of the Univer-
sity subscribed $50,000 to the third
Loan at the last meeting held on
April 5. A subscription of a similar
amount was made by that body to the
second Loan. The present subscrp-
tion is to be independent of the cam-
pus quota.
Dr. F. B. Wahr, of the German de-
partment, now absent on leave as cor-
poral in the national army at Camp
Custer, was granted a week's leave of
absence from the camp to assist in
the present campaign for the raising
of funds.
HILL AUDITORIUM FILLED TO
CAPACITY AT LOAN MEETING
More than 5,000 people were turned
away from Hill auditorium Sunday

night ,for lack of room when the
Jockie band of Chicago made its ap-
pearance in the interests of the third
Liberty Loan. Among the speakers
at this mass meeting were Mr. James
Schermerhorn, publisher of ,the De-
troit Times, Roscoe 0. Bonisteel, '12L,
and Dr. F. B. Wahr, of the German de-
partment, now at Camp Custer. The
Rev. Lloyd C. -Douglas, of the Congre-
gational church, presided, and Newton
C, Fetter, secretary of the student Y.
M. C. A., led in the singing.
An announcement from the city
(Continued on Page Six)

*1

All seniors wishing caps and
gowns must order them before *
Thursday. *
*
* * * * * * * * * * .* *

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