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April 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY ANfi VIGIlIT
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 5, 1918.

PRICE 9

_

I

PRESIDENT SIGNS
- THIRD LOAN BILL
Washington, April 4.-The legisla-
tive foundation for the third Liberty
Loan was laid tonight when Congress
completed, and President Wilson sign-
ed the bill, authorizing the issuance
of additional bonds at four and one-
quarter per cent.
Earlier in the day the treasury an-
nounced that the bonds would ma-
ture in 10 years, that the loan cam-
paign opening Saturday - would con-
tinue four weeks until May 4, and that
after the initial payment of five per
cent on subscription, installments of
20, 25, and 40 per cent would be due
respectively on May 28, July 18, and
August 15. The amount of $3,000,000,-
000, and over subscriptions, and the
only remaining details to be deter-
mined by the treasury, are the ar-
rangements for the conversion of
bonds of the first and second loans
into third Liberty bonds.
Within an hour after President
Wilson signed the bond bill, the first
completed bond of the third Liberty
Loan came from the press of the bu-
reau of engraving and printing. Forty
thousand more bonds will be ready in
the morning, 100,000 by Saturday and
thereafter, they will be turned out at
the rate of 500,000 a day to supply
demands for cash sales and immediate
delivery.

U. S.

y in France,
forces are
n the Meuse
released for
ly with a
raided one
posts in this

region w.

e attacking
attckngCOMEDY CLUB PRACTICES
ously bom-
t line andN
gzagging up NOT HALTED
eraraiding
the listen- CLOSENESS OF PRESENTATION
DATE NECESSITATES CON-
the enemy TINUANCE -

of the

Inactivity to con-
many of them be-
ricity.
can sectors were
y. The Germans,
i the sector north-
'Iterf eres
zi Service
tly responsible for
arity in the mail
'. Sanzi, assistant
nn Arbor post of-
made yesterday,
he curtailment of
been in evidence
two months, the
lost 800 men who
draft," Mr. Sanzi
such a number is
the service in the
losing the experi-
and other men in
he department is
aew men who are
d. In most cases,
found difficult to
nd a considerable
is therefore made

Because the performance of "Miss
Hobbs" will occur so soon after the
'return from vacation, April 19, it has
not been thought advisable by the
Comedy club to entirely cancel rehear-
sals, and they will be continued
through vacation. The production is
now approaching professional smooth-
ness, and Warren H. Townsend, stage
director, is confident it will be at-
tained by the day of presentation.
; The business staff under direction
f Walter H. Reiss, '20, is preparing,
to proceed with its work, and the per-
sonnel of the committees in charge of
the different divisions will be an-
nounced immediately after the return
from vacation. They will then start
in immediately to carry out their part'
bf the program.
A.E.HOR NE ELECTED
TO UNION OFFICE
A. E. Horne, Jr., '18, was elected lit-
erary vice-president of the Union, at
a meeting of the board of directors,
held yesterday. Horne succeeds Carl
Neumann, ex-'18, now in the naval
auxiliary reserve at Cleveland.
The board also accepted a new con-
stitution for the Mimes. By means of
this, a working arrangement is form-
ed whereby the Mimes acts as an ad-
visory body to the board in
all matters pertaining to the
policy of the Union opera.
The board, by agreement with the
Mimes, is not to take any action as
to the policy of the opera until it has
accepted for consideration the opin-
ion of the Mimes, as expressed by a
resolution from that society.
A. J. Gornetzky, '19L, was granted
permission to use in a revue, during
the coming summer, certain parts of
the opera scores of the last three
years.
2 ADDITIONAL WAR SECRETARIES
APPROVED BY CONGRESSMEN
Washington, April 4.-Congress to-
day took final action on the bill creat-
ing two additional secretaries of war.
The appointments probably will be
announced within a few days. It is
understood that the men to be select-
ed are Edward R.'Stettinius, surveyor
of army purchasers, and Frederick
Koppel, dean of Columbia university,
who is now acting as confidential as-
sistant to Secretary Baker.
With the appointment of the new
secretaries, re-organization of the
war department, worked out by Sec-
retary Baker, and approved by the
President, will be put into full effect.

Student Workers Not to Begin Until
. April 16; Teams Appointed to
Push Subscriptionst
CITY CAMPAIGN OPENS TONIGHT
WITH DINNER AT Y. M., C. A.
Chicago Jackies' Band Will Appear
atfass Meeting in Hill Au- '
ditoriuM
The University faculty will be can-
vassed for the third Liberty Loan dur-
ing the Easter vacation. Although the
student campaign will not start until
April 16, the, committee has decided
to begin the campaign among the
members of the faculty as soon as
possible.
Ten teams, each made up of 15
students, were appointed yesterday to
conduct the drive among the students
immediately upon the reopening of
school after the Easter vacation. Two
senior and junior teams, 19 n each,
were appointed 'among the women stu-
dents to conduct the women canvass1
under the direction of Mildred C. Migh-
ell, '18. Each member of these teams
will have two assistants, thus making
a total of 14 women working in the'
interest of the third drive.
Opening Dinner Tonight
The city campaign will officially open
at a dinner which is to be given at
6 o'clock tonight at the city Y. M. C.
A. An attempt will be made to get
as many members of the student teams
as possible to attend. A number of
speakers representing the city, county,
state, and University will be present
to address the gathering.
Arrangements are being made by
the local committee for a patriotic
meeting to be held in Hil auditorium
on April 14, at which the third Liberty
Loan Jackie band of Chicago, will
make an, appearance. The band is
scheduled to arrive here after a de-'
monstration in Detroit.
Mayor Sets Aside Day
Mayor Ernst M. Wurster of this city,
issued a proclamation yesterday call-
ing upon every citizen of Ann Arbor
to set aside tomorrow as a day of
commemoration of our entrance into
the war, and at the same time to
befittingly start the opening of the
third Liberty Loan campaign.
A Boy Scout Liberty Loan assembly
Will be held Saturday afternoon at the
county court house, at which Judge
George Sample will preside. Several
speakers will address the boys. Judge
Sample will act as representative of
the treasury department at Washing-
ton, and will present war service em-
blems to 12 scouts who sold the most
bonds during the second Loan drive.
The Boy Scouts of America will conduct
a similar campaign for this third drive
from April 27 to May 4.
ITALY REGARDS UZERNIN'S
SPEECH AS HUN PEACE BAIT
Washington, April 4.-Italy, like the
other Allies, regards the recent speech
of Count Czernin, the Austro-Hun-
garian minister, as merely another
phase of the Teutonic peace offensive.
An official dispatch from Rome to-
day says:
"The Italian press finds that the
Austrian premier's acceptance of the
four fundamental points of President
Wilson's second message is flatly con-
tradicted by the very recent actions
of Austria. In fact, a tremendous

concentration of forces is being made
against Italy, and Count Czernin de-
clared in his speech that the French
and Italian aspirations are 'foolish
utopia.'"
MINNESOTA STAR SHOT PUTTER
JOINS CHICAGO NAVAL SCHOOL
Minneapolis, April 4.-George Haus-
er, captain of the 1917 squad of the
University of Minnesota football team,
and star shot putter, will enter .the
naval officers' material training school
of Chicago, it was announced today.
He is the fourth Minnesota star to
enter the school.
Student Members Entertain Pastor
Students of the University, associa-
ed with the Presbyterian church, gave
a surprise party to the Rev. Leonard
A. Barrett last night. He was present-
ed with a handsome hamper.

GOVERNMENT SENDS
199 MECHANICS HERE
Airplane, automobile, and truck
mechanics numbering 199, are to be
sent here by the government between
the 15th and 20th of April, according
to a telegram received yesterday by
the University.
The men are to be trained in spec-
ialized wotk in the engineering shops,
under Prof. W. L. Miggett, superin-
tendent of the shops. Some will also
be taking a course in gas-engine work
in the mechanical laboratory.
Mr. J. C. Christensen, of the pur-
chasing department of the University,
will go to Detroit today to secure
tools and shop materials for present-
ing the work. Material will also be
purchased for the repair and exten-
sion of buildings to accommodate the
mechanics.
STAMP SALES FALL
OFF DURING WEEK
After showing a considerable in-
crease in the sales of thrift and war
savings stamps during the latter part
of March, the campaign has once more
taken a slump since the first of April.
The sales for the last week were
for the following amounts: March
28, $1,897.09; March 29, $2,043.17;
March 30, $1,741.80; April 1, $225.60;
April 2, $677.95; and April 3, $269.15.
The post office officials expect an
increase in the sales during the latter
part of this month, having experienc-
ed slumps during the first week of
each month since the opening of the
campaign. Orders -taken as a result
of the drive are still coming in. The
drive, which was started two weeks
ago, will be continued through April.

STATE EXAMINATION FOR
ARCHITECTS HELD NEXT'

*:
*:

Daily Suspends for 10 Days *
With this issue, The Daily sus- *
pends publication until Tuesday, *
April 16. This will enable The *
Daily staff to go to their homes *
for the spring vacation. *

Examinations for registration of
architects by the state board will be
held April 10, 11, and 12 in room
201-5 of the new Engineering build-
ing.. Examinations will be given in
steel, reinforced concrete and wood
construction. They will also cover
such topics as building, planning, and
design, building equipment, and the
history of architecture.
While the examinations are being
given the large drafting room of the
College of Architecture will be closed
to students.
The architects' registration law in this
state was passed in the spring of 1915,
and is similar to that in force in 13
other states of the union and most of
the provinces of Canada. Its purpose
is to assure proper qualifications, as
a protection to the public. Professor
Larch, of the College of Architecture,
is a member of the state board.
9,500 TON CONCRETE SHIPS
TO BE BUILT IN NEW YARD
Washington, April 4.-A new ship-
building yard, to be used exclusively
for the construction of concrete ships,
will be established soon by the ship-
ping board, It will be located in some
southern city where frosts will not
handicap the work.
The new yard will have three ways,
each of which will be utilized im-
mediately in the building of 3,500 ton
concrete vessels.
86 PERSONS KILLED, AND 100
WOUNDED IN ALLIED AIR RAIDS
Amsterdam, April 4.-Dispatches to
Nesnouvelles state that on the occa-
sion of the last Allied air raid on
Coblanz, 26 persons were killed, and
100 wounded. Great damage was
done. The railroad station was de-
molished. In the last raid on Trezes,
60 persons were killed and 100 were
wounded. The railroad station was
damaged and streets in the neighbor-
hood were heaped with ruins.
U. OF C. PROF. ELECTED HEAD
OF AMERICAN ORIENTAL SOCIETY
New Haven, Conn., April 4.-Prof.-
James A. Bristed, of the Universityl
of , Chicago was elected 'president of
the American Oriental Society at its
100th annual' meeting today at Yale.
The next meeting will be held in Phil-
adelphia.'
Must Order Caps and Gowns Today
All orders for senior caps, gowns,
and canes must be placed before va-
cation commences.

N EW G ER M A N O FFEN S I E O PE N S 019M L I E F O ~iI N.H l i 0,0 N r
AIENSROYi i E 10,0IN Fl
* * *""" * ~i. ~ $

WEEK

'NAVLRESERVES WAN
509 TUEN ECRUITS,
CIIARLES F. LAMBERT RETURNS
TO ENLIST MORE
MEN
Probably 50 more students will be
recruited for the United States naval
reserves before the end of the present
semester, according to Charles F.
Lambert, ex-'19.
"There is an exceptional opportun-
ity for men in this department," stat-
ed Lambert last night, who returned
yesterday afternoon from Detroit for
the purpose of enlisting several stu-
dents. "The patrol commandant at
Detroit wants a few men, preferably
senior engineers, to join before Sat-
urday.
Only men of exceptional qualifica-
tions, both physical and mental, are
desired. No promise is made regard-
ing promotions, which depend entire-
ly upon the individual. The training
in the R. O. T. C. gives students the
necessary qualifications to advance
quickly in the, naval reserves."
All men desiring to join by Satur-
day must see Charles F. Lambert, or
call 131, before 10 o'clock this morn-
ing. Students seriously thinking of
enlisting before the end of the sem-
ester, can obtain all details from Rob-
ert F. Grindley, '21E, by telephoning
131.
.corm Club 1/or
Girls in Service
Many girls from Michigan are en-
tering the service of the government
in Washington. To prevent the lone-
liness which will probably come to
many of these girls, the wives of sen-
ators and representatives in Congress
have organized what is known as the
Congressional club.
Each state has a delegate in this
club, and it is their desire to get into
friendly touch with young women
newly arrived in Washington. To as-,
sivt them in this work, girls who are
entering war-service work there, or
their parents or friends, are invited to
communicate with the Congressional
club, 2001 New Hampshire Ave.,
Washington, D. C.
LATIN-AMERICAN PUBLICATION
FOR STUDENTS STARTED hERE

(By Associated Press)
German troops numbering well o
100,000 delivered a terrific att
against the French along a front
nearly nine miles from Grivesnes
north of the Amen-Roye road. T
were met with a storm of fire fr
the French guns, and although
assaults were repeated time a
time, they succeeded in gaining o
a small setion of ground.
The French regained Grivesnes,
the Germans occupied the villages
Mailly, Raineval, and Morisel.
The announcement by the war
fice tonight of this new offensive W
says that by a powerful counter
tack the French made progress
this point,
Picardy Active
After several days of compara
inactivity along the battle front
Picardy, bitter fighting has been
sumed along the western sector of
salient in the lines of the AllIes.
tacks by the Germans against the B
ish and French are admitted to h
yielded some gains to the invaders
the critical sectors just to the eas
the city of Amiens.
Heavy Fighting
The fighting, according to latest
ports, has been heaviest in the ne
borhood of Hamel, where the Bri
were forced back slightly, and fart
to the south, where the French wa
forced to give ground.
.Nothing is known as to the det
of the battles in these sectors, but
fact that the Germans have been i
degree successful would seem to
dicate .that they had succeeded
bringing up some of their heavier
non and new divisions with w
to continue their attacks upon Ami,
British Retake Ayette
The British, since retaking Aye
south of Arras, have not resumed ti
offensive, so far as reported by I
don, but the German official stateme
say that four attacks by the Ente
forces against the heights south'
of Moreuil were repulsed with he
losses. There are no reports of fi
ing, except outpost encounters al
the French lines and the Oise river
There have been heavy artillery b
bardments of British positions on
Menin road and at Passchendaele
and northwest of Ypres, according
London reports. As yet, howe
there is nothing to foreshadow an
fort by the Germans to attack th
French Raid Successfully
On the French front before Rhe
and Verdun, successful raidng o
ations have been carried out by
French. The French report very he
artillery engagements north of M
dither,
Nothing has been reported from
Italian front, and it is not likely
an attack has been launched ther
the Austrians who have gathered
enormous army corps for a poss
drive southward into the - plains
northern Italy.
ALLIED FORCES MAKE GAINS
ON SOMME; RHEIMS BOMBARI
Berlin, via London, April 4.-,
times yesterday the Entente fo
vainly endeavored to reach
heights wrested from them south3
of Mouriville, says the official st
ment issued today by the German
office. The attacks, it is added, bi
down with heavy losses.
The reports from general headqu
ers this evening say:
"During the continuation of our
tacks south of. the Somme fresh
cesses have been won.
"As reprisals for the French b

bardment of our shelters in Leon
the past few days, Rheims has b
subjected to our fire."

HEAVY FIGHTING NEAR HA
SWHERE BRITISH WERE
FORCED BACK
FOE HURLS FORCES
AT PICARDY FRC
French Conduct Successful At
Before Rhelins and Verdun;
Italian Front Quiet

O DO
IN N. Y.

Van Tyne, head of the
.ment of the University,
afternoon for New York
3 will remain for an in-
working at the head-
.e National security lea-
r Van Tyne will engage-
rork, and in giving lec-
to those which he has
as University extension
ghout Michigan and ad-
on the causes of the
reasons why the United

Mr. Jose Hernandez, instructor in'
Spanish, will be director and general
secretary of a new publication, El Es-
tudiante Latino, printed here for the!
purpose of uniting all the Latin-Am-
erican students attending colleges of
the United States. The magazine will
be printed in both Spanish and Por-
tuguese, containing articles by the
prominent writers in both countries,
and also translations from the best
types of modern English literature.
The first issue of 2,000 copies will ap-
pear in May, and will be sent to the
colleges 'throughout the country.
Mr. Hernandez says in regard to
this publication, "It is necessary tol
bring about a bond of sympathy and
knowledge of the customs and ideals
characteristic of the South American
countries, that a better understand-
ing may exist between the Latin-Am-
erican countries and the United
States. To do this, students must be
brought into a closer contact with
each other, since they will be the lead-
ers of their people when they return
with the advanced learning obtained
in our universities."

ill be given
d the quiz-
0. W. Ste-
assisting in
course con-
'f"e wi1 hb

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