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April 04, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE1 MICHIGAN DAILY

W

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...

I

[IGH morale and neat appearance are
inseperable - in business and profess-
ional life as well as in the fighting
force.
You men who control the destiny of
industrial America will find the qual-
ities you need-the snap of youth, the
dignity of age, the refinement of ex-
perience and the acme of value-best
expressed in

NO BREAD ON BOARDING
HOUSE' DININER MENUES
ADDED VEGETABLES SUPPLY
NEEDED BUTTER; OTHER
MEALS NORMAL

SPECIIZTION TALKS
B Y CMPUS PROFESSORS

I Early Spring Showing o

r

Bread has been
.taken off next,
week's dinner men-
ues arranged for the
campus boarding
houses by the Uni-
versity health sani-

pp v, JjV
Smart C

IDENSCIIMITA PFEL & 0.o

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t

LAN DERS
ORW

(

PHONE 294

213 E LIBERTYl

I',,

ANN A RBOR GARAGE.
DEALERS IN
- ~

tarian. As a substitute, many butter,
ed vegetables have been added to the
regular list, so that students may be
given enough butter. This move is
in compliance with the latest rules of
the food administration, which has
emphasized the necessity of wheat
conservation. Bread has been left a
part of the diet for breakfasts and
luncheons, however.
The conservation health menues for
next week are as follows:
Monday-Wheatless
Breakfast-Bananas, white corn-
meal mush or corn flakes, Victory
bread toasted, butter or oleo, coffee or
milk. '.
Lunch-Lima bean soup, hashed
brown potatoes, Hungarian goulash,'
dill pickles, oatmeal bread, butter or
oleo, junket,.nutmeg sauce, tea or
milk.
Dinner - Riced potatoes, sausage
loaf, buttered parsnips, lettuce, French
dressing, steamed Indian pudding,
jelly sauce, tea, coffee or milk.
Tuesday
Breakfast-Stewed apricots, rolled
oats or puffed rice, Victory bread
toasted, butter or oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Scalloped potatoes, mutton
chops, cottage cheese and walnut sal-
ad, corn muffins, butter or oleo, prune
tapioca, tea or milk.
Dinner-Baked potatoes, rib roast
of beef, gravy, Yorkshire pudding,
buttered beets, nut fruit jelly, tea,
coffee or milk,
Wednesday-Wheatless
Breakfast-Dates, cracked barley
or corn flakes, Victory toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Corn soup, shepherds pie,
chopped pickle, brown bread, butter or.
oleo, coffee jelly, tea or milk.
Dinner-Mashed pottoes, mutton
roast, mint sauce, cabbage with may-
onnaise, buttered turnips, lemon ice
and barley cookies, tea, coffee or milk.
Thursday
Breakfast-Oranges, cornmeal or
puffed corn, Victory toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk.+
Lunch-Lyonnaise potatoes, ham-
burg steak, tomato sauce, vegetable,
salad, French dressing, date muffins,
butter or oleo, chocolate custard, teaA
or milk.'
Ikier-Steamed potatoes, mutton
en cas erol, creamed vegetable oys-.
ters, Harvard beets, cherry pie, tea,
coffee or milk.

PROF. W. B. PILLSBURY TELLS
OF POSSIBILITIES FOW
PSYCHOLOGISTS
(By Prof. W. B. Pillsbury)
In any discussion of this topic it
should be assumed that the study of
psychology will be, for most students,
in preparalttioif' for one of the estab-
lished professions. Relatively few
will become psychologists. That psy-
chology forms an essential part of the
training of the teacher, the physician,
and, in smaller measure, of the lawyer
and business man is generally accept-
ed. The undergraduate courses are
adapted to the requirements of these
students at the same time that they
lay a foundation for the advanced
work.
Aside from the professorships in
psychology in colleges and normal
schools, special positions for psycho-
logists are of comparatively recent
development. Most positions make
application of mental tests. Tests
were first used to detect case of de-
ficiences in school children. Psycho-
logists were employed in Chicago to
study the children who did not make
good progress in their work, to de-
termine their mental status, and make
recommendations for methods of in-
struction. Most cities now have a staff
of psychologists for this work.
Juvenile Cases of Defectives
It was soon found that many of the
juvenile eases brought before the
courts belonged to the class of mental
defectives, and psychologists are now
attached to most of the courts to make
similar examinations.
One must havemeans of separating
the mentally defective from the nor-
mal before sentence is passed. In
this again Chicago led by establishing
a mental clinic in the juvenile court3
which determines the mental age and
special form of abnormality of each
child who appears in the court. Now
Detroit and Boston both have clinics{
of this type and penal institutions
in many states have a psycho-
logist on the staff. Mental tests
have been made since 1913 of the sus-f
picious cases among the immigrantsj
at Ellis island, and large numbers1
have been excluded because of defects
thus brought to light. The tests are
made by a physician who is also at

Cousins & Hall

Members of the Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association
GET YOUR
Text Books and Suppies
From the "Store with the College'Spirit"

Society Brand and
Hickey-Freeman Suits

Between the Theatres

A so just reeived a line of Spring Hats and Caps

FOR

Sheehan & Co

FLOWERS

of every description
See

Ann Arbor

Detroit

'i a uertkG01

_ !
1

HURONV

special work in the tests themselves.
In addition, the school and court
worker should have work in sociology
and education as well as in the phy-
sical and biological sciences presup-
posed in psychology. A full medical
course is desirable, but few physicians
are willing to accept the salaries of-
fered by positions of this kind. If the
employment manager position de-
velop, they will require knowledge of
business methods, of political econ-
omy and sociology, rather than of
education. In any case, a sound gen-
eral training is more important than
too much specialization. The tests
themselves may be learned relatively
quickly by one who has a good thor-
ough knowledge of psychological prin-
ciples and methods.
MEN'S HEALTH AND CARRIAGE
IMPROVED, SAYS LIEUT. MULLEN

1002 S.
UNIV. AVE.

SPRING STYLES

PHONE 11011

Optical Service
EYES EXAMINED
Try our drugless method and save
time and inconvenience
Broken lenses replaced same day
R. C. Fuller, Optometrist
With Haller & Fuller, State St.

War Correspondence Cards Returned
More than 100 war corespondence
cards have been returned to the com-
mittee of the Engineering society
which has charge of their distribu-
tion. They were given to all engin-
eering students wh9 left college to
enter the service.
Five hundred and eight more were
mailed by the committee Saturday to'
the men. The cards are in duplex
form,

psychologist,
Are Employment Agents
Some of the large manufacturing
establishments of Pittsburg joined two
years ago in establishing a bureau at
the Carnegie Institute of Technology
for the testing of salesmen. This was
so successful that several of the large
corporations of the country now em-
ploy psychologists to select their
salesmen. A large bank in New York
last year, employed two psychologists
as employment agents, and a large in-
surance company has for some years
selected its clerks on the basis of
mental measurements. The fact that
in some places telephone operators
and motormen are employed only aft-
er mental tests, makes it seem possible
that a trained psychologist may find
a number of positions as employment
manager.

:1

Friday
Breakfast - Prunes, steamed oat-
meal or corn flakes, Victory toast,
butter or oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Tomato soup, potato cakes,
salmon souffle, creamed carrots, cel-
ery, corn bread, butter or oleo, sauce
and cake.
Dinner-Baked potatoes, halibut
with egg sauce, onions, drawn butter
sauce, cucumber salad, lemon pie, tea,
coffee or milk.
Saturday
Breakfast - Bananas, }hominy or
puffed rice, Victory toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk.
Lunch-Creamed potatoes, corned
beef hash, mustard, tomato jelly sal-
ad, barley biscuit, butter or oleo, gin-
ger blanc mange, tea or milk.
Dinner-Boiled potatoes, beef steak,
buttered peas, pineapple salad, cottage
pudding, raspberry sauce, tea, coffee
or milk.
Sunday
Breakfast - Grapefruit, oatmeal.
cakes, syrup, Victory toast, butter or
oleo, coffee or milk..
Dinner-Mashed potatoes, chicken,?
pot pie, barley dumplings, spinach,
lettuce, Thousand Island dressing,
jelly, date pie a la mode, tea, coffee or
milk.
Lunch-Salmon salad, egg garnish,1
pickled pears, buckwheat muffins with
prunes, cocoa, tea, coffee or milk.
rsatronize Our Advertisers.-Adv

Make War Tests
The most spectacular applications-
of psychological methods have come
with the war. One of the men who
had been developing tests for sales-
men thought that the same methods
might be used in obtaining estimates
of the ability of officers, and secured
the permission of the war department
to apply them. They were so success-
ful that, the method has been adopt-
ed for rating all officers of the nation-
al and regular army. Later it was
decided to test all the recruits to elim-
inate those mentally unfit for service,
either because of low intelligence or
emotional instability. A special group
of psychologists was attached to the
signal service to test aviators, and
still more recently a new call has
been made for men to test and aid in
training wounded who must be re-
educated.
Preparation for Positions
Each of the positions enumerated
above requires more training than can
be expected of undergraduates. In
preparation for them, the undergrad-
uate should take courses in general
psychology first, and only later begin

That the health of the cadets has
noticeably improved in the course of
the year's training was the opinion
of Lieut. G. C. Mullen, expressed yes-
terday. "I am able to notice also,"
he said, "that he walk and carriage
of the men in uniform is much better
than last fall."
Lieutenant Mullen recently received
a communication from the health ser-
vice which reads as follows:
"At a recent meeting of our staff,
the health of students as influenced by
military drill was, discussed with the
following conclusions:
"It is our opinion that the general
health of the student body has been
maintained at a higher level than
formerly because of the regular sys-
tematic outdoor exercise which the
drill gives. The staff wishes to con-
vey their appreciation of the good in-
fluence which the drill has had on
the student health in general."
Prof. Scharfman to Give Lectures
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman of the econ-
omics department, will dieliver a ser-
ies of five extension lectures in the
Escanaba district, of the upper penin-
sula, during the Easter vacation, on
"Saving and Spending in Peace and
War."
The time and place of these lectures
are as follows: Monday at Stevenson,
Tuesday at Menominee, Wednesday at.
Gladstone, Thursday at Escanaba, and
Friday at. Manistique. Professor
Sharfman will return to Ann Arbor in
time to resume his activities as pub-
licity manager of the University Lib-
erty Loan committee.
Eighty-one in Shipbuilding Reserve,
Eighty-one men have been enrolled
to date in the United States ship-
building reserve section being re-
cruited at. the local postoffice. Most
of the applicants are carpenters and
painters. This exodus is caused by
the scarcity of construction work in
the city.
Ruth Law Flies Over- South Bend
South Bend, Ind., April 3.- Ruth
Law, known as the foremost aviatrix
of the world, flew over this city today,
doing various "stunts" as an adver-
tisement for the war chest fund be-
ing raised here. She will repeat her
performance tomorrow.

/ ,~
'1/'_

Copyrlght ilart chaffuer & Marx
Hart Schaffner & Marx

:

iI

,::
A_,,

spring suits and top coats are
more snappy than ever this
spring; the kind of clothes red-
blooded young ien will be
wearing. They have incorporat-
ed in them all the style tenden-
cies that will be popular.
We have bought freely and as
a consequence offer you choice
of a stock unequalled for rich-
ness of choice and variety of
style, anywhere but in" their
shops. You will find here
clothes as good as you can buy
in any city, and the price is
more reasonable.
New neckwear, Steson and
Knox Hats.
Reule, Conlin, Fegel & CO,
The Big Home of Hart Schaff-
ner and Marx Clothes, at South-
west Corner Main and Washing-
ton Streets.
CONTRACT FOR TRUNING OF
200 MECHANICS IS RECEIVED
A signed contract providing for the
training of MicIigan's quota of 200
mechanics was received from the war
department yesterday.
The contract does not specify when
the men are to be sent or how many
will come. A telegram was sent to
Washington yesterday asking definite
information as to when the first con-

NCEY OLCOTT IN "ONCE UPON A TIME," AT THE WHITNEY,
ONDAY, APRIL 8.

LAY REGISTRATION FOR I
[EN UNTIL END OF MONTH'
stration for women has been
ied from April 8 to April 27. It
erefore be impossible for wo-
the University to assist with
.ual work during Easter vaca-

the work. These instructions may be
obtained at the office of the dean of
women. It is Mrs. Crane's desire that
University women aid in forming reg-
istration units. Printed lists regard-
ing the units already organized may
be found in the corridor of Barbour
gy11mnasiunm.
There are opportunities for you th
Daily advertisements. Read them.

We Represent the
Steinway, Knabe, Vose & Sons, Sohmer, Grinnell Bros.,
Sterling, Shominger, and many other makes.
The world's famous Pianola Player Pianos, Victor
ictrolas. SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
GRINNELL BROS., 116 S. Main St.

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