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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 04, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ATE PRESS
exclusively entitled
n of all news dis-
ot otherwise credit-
so the local news

:r at the University of
d every mjorning except
university year.
stofllce at Ann Arbor as
r Press Building.
96o; Editorial, 2414.
ot to exceed 300 words,
ure not necessarily to ap-
an evidence of faith, and
will be published in The
ion of the Editor, if left
The Daily notice box in
Ethe general library where
:cted at 7 :3o o'clock each

TOO MUCH DANCING
The war has been carried on at a
terrific pace. Long range cannon, gas
bombs, and other instruments of des-
truction has been invented with great
rapidity. At Michigan, interest in the
war has been strong. Many of the
amusements and traditions have been
abandoned for the sake of Mars. One
tactivity, however, has held its own
place. This is dancing.
Organizations have been hindered
by apathy on the part of members
when starting new movements. The
excuse given is the war. No dance
proposed lacks earnest support. Some
powerful element in human nature
must be responsible for this popular-
ity.

Scoola Musick-Oh, girruls, when
we get our uniforms I shan't have
to spend any money for putts.
The chorus-Whoizzy?
S. M.-You're all wrong. I've got
two perfectly good music-rolls.
The Ann Arbor railroad seems to be
in some doubt as to whether its rails
will stand the excess strain to which
they are to be subjected in the near
future. A little test trip to Toledo is
to be put on tomorrow.
You Guessed It
Cary:-March having gone the way'
of Hindenburg's April fool party, you
will probably not be much interested
in the fact that there are two each
of Lambs and Lyons in the student di-
rectory.

CARYATID

cations will receive no
script will be returned
postage for that pur-

i

Women wishing to act as squad-
leaders for tennis should report at the
office of the physical director.
Those who have not taken examin-
inations in gymnasium work will take
them today and tomorrow at the reg-
ular class hours.
Spring sports will begin April 16.
The lists are posted in Barbour gym-
nasium.
Geneva club will hold an important
business meeting at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in Barbour gymnasium.
Women from this state who will
help prepare for registration in their
home communities during spring va-
cation are asked to sign today with
Miss Louise Potter at Barbour gym-
nasium.
The Girls' Educational club will
meet at 7:30 o'clock this evening with
Alice Worum, '18, at 615 East Univer-
sity avenue. .All members are urged
to be present.
SUMMER SESSION EXPECTED
TO HAVE REGULAR NUMBER

Unusual Bargain's
T ENNIS RACKETS
100 Rackets to select from-all the leading makes
RACKET RESTRINCING PROMPTLY DONE
Wahr' s University Bookstores
MAIN STREET STATE STREET
THE EBERBACH & SON COMPANY
200-204 E. Liberty Street

aid......Managing Editor
.Business Manager

..News
on............City
horn, Jr. Sports
y.........Associate
ser ........ Telegraph

Editor
Editor
Editor
E:ditor
Editor

V. Mlighell.........Women's Editor
H. Cooley.......-iterary Editor
Cholette......Publication Manager
Wohl........ Circulation Manager
Smith..........Credit Manager
NIGHT EDITORS
Ba.rnes Walter R. Atlas
Osius, Ji. Mark K. Ehlbert
William W. Fox
REPORTERS'
Apine Paul A. Shinkman{
ish Philip Slomovitz
9. Price Frances Broene
,vn Milton Marx
Hunter K. Frances Handibo
L~andis Edgar L. Rice
ergeant Vincent I. Riorden
Rilla A. Nelson
BUSINESS STAFF
tzinger Harry D. Hause
tress Katherine Kilpatrick
isten Frances H. Macdonald
miedeskamp Agnes Abele
Cadwell, Jr. L. A. Storrer
Frances H. Case
RSDAY, APRIL 4, 1918.

Historically the dance is as interest-
ing as any of our customs. From the
dance of the ancient Greek youths and
maidens given in honor of the divin-
ities of that tinie, to the more sensual
dance of the Hawaiians is a long step,
'but it brings out the fact that every'
nation has had somte form of dance.
These have all expressed some sym-
bol of religion or life. The greatest
criticism of the modern dance is that
it carries no symbol, has no meaning.
If the dance is thoughtless in itselA,
the conversation at the average dance
also tends to be flippant and shallow.
This dangerous tendency to allow
-the dance to take up too much time
was seen by the Board in Control of
Student affairs a year ago. They ab-
olished mid-week dances. But there
is still too much dancing at Michigan.
The men and women who devote their
spare time to dancing do little else.
They are the parasites of the Univer-
sity. They use all the advantages and
give nothing in return.
This year. a more serious attitude
prevails at the University. We are all
expected to give up something for the
privilege of remaining in school.
Many of our best men have gone to
the' front and have gladly sacrificed
their opportunities in order that the
younger generation may have a
chance to live under a democratic
government. It is not fair to these
men to persist in an activity which is
adding nothing to the betterment of
the state. A realization of our obli-
gation to these men should abate in
large measure the dancing craze
which still thrives at Michigan at the
expense of many worthy activities.

The sweetheart service flag idea is
reported to be spreading like wildfire,
particularly since it has become thor-
oughly understood that the rule, stat-
ing that one man cannot be the pre-
text for two flags, doesn't work both
ways. There seems to be no reason,
except her face, why a girl shouldn't
have a whole necklace of blue stars
superimposed on red hearts. The
Grouch-says that no doubt the dear
things will soon be carrying on their
own peculiar feminine transactions by
means of strings of them just like Lo
the poor Indian with his wampum.
And then think how gay Memorial
day will be with each house brightly
festooned in sweetheart flag draper-
ies! It must be great to be the girl
they left behind them.
Blood Will Tell
"On my mother's side I'm descend-
ed from kings," observed the trucul-
ent night editor. "The Stuarts."
"Well, I'm descended from Alfred
the Great," came back the maiden at
the womeni's typewriter. "He's older
and a better king."
"You both of you descended quite
a way," arbitrated the sarcastic wire-
tapper. "And anyway, my great-
grandfather was chief wriggler for
Queen Lil."

The place to go when you want
Chemicals
Laboratory Supplies
Drugs and Toilet Articles

..

Laundry Cases
For Parcel Post

r--Charles I. Osius,

Jr.

"Inquiries which are coming in
seem to indicate that the attendance
of the 1918 summer session will fully
equal that of last year," said Dean
Edward H. Kraus yesterday. "This
year, for the first time, the abridged
edition of the summer session bulletin
which has been spread broadcast
throughout the state, contained an
addressed card to be returned to the
University asking for further inform-
ation. It- has thus far given good re-
sults."
Dean Kraus has suggested that stu-
dents who go home for spring vaca-
tion secure the names and addresses
of persons who might want to attend
summer school, and mail them to the
summer session office.
"The summer session is open to any
person who thinks that he will be able
to do the work," explained Dean
Kraus. "It will help those who have
not finished high school to secure
credit toward graduation, or a person
who just graduated need not wait for
the opening of the fall semester to
matriculate. He may start his regu-

PUSHED INTO ACTION?
t necessary that the American
be continually pushed into ac-
y some outside agency? Ex-
pressure has been a prominent
in almost everything pertaining
war that has been well ac-
shed in this country to date.
ary efforts, especially in finan-
sistance, have been negligible.
the case of the Thrift stamps
he War Savings certificates.
les to date would indicate that
an of small means, for whom
trift stamp is the solution to-
monetary aid, is 'disinterested.
st published recently of the en-
states' war savings work, Mich-
as third from the bottom in per
buying. This was so in spite
fact that the per capita dis-
>n of wealth is this state is
more than that in many states
far higher on the scale. The
tage of foreigners is not great
higan, and states which have{
aid to contain a number of Ger-
orn people, such as Missouri,
xceedingly high rankings. The
for scarcity in sales lies mainly
he American sympathizers, and
th the state's pro-German ele-
University has contributed but
With more than one-fourth of
ar behind us the quota over
ire country is far behind what
d be. But in Michigan, par-
y, it is exceedingly discour-

The Slater Book Shop'

sentiment is not shared universally
by Michigan alumnae.
With the many life membership sub-
scriptions which the Union has re-
ceived lately have been several sub-
scriptions from women graduates of
the University. The latest one to ar-
rive was sent by an alumna of 1902.
The money received from these wo-
men has been returned, as the pres-
ent constitution of the Union does not
allow women to be granted member-
ship.
Prof. Willard Speaks to Chemists
Prof. H. H. Willard of the chemis-
try department, explained some of the
methods of chemical analysis which
have been recently developed in the
laboratory of the University before a
meeting yesterday afternoon, of the
Michigan branch of the American
Chemical society in the Chemistry
building.

Few preparations for the spring
gardens talked about during the wint-'
er have been seen. Perhaps we are
becoming a letAthe-other-fellow-do-it
people.
Small boys' grandmothers will begin
dying off in large numbers again next
week. The reason for their fatal ill-
ness is the umpire's announcement of
"play ball."
Chairman Hurley has admitted that
the shipbuilding program is behind
schedule. That's something the rest
of the country has admitted for some
little time.
Hindenburg, not the kaiser, must
have been in charge of the recent big
German drive. It failed, if you re-
member.
This next draft of 1,500,000 men
should result in an even greater shud-
der on the part of the kaiser.

We're being strongly influenzed to
go to the health service.
Elmer Schact, '18E, Enlists in Navy
Elmer Schact, '18E, has enlisted in
the navy, and will leave within the
next two weeks for a five months'
training course at Hoboken, N. Y.
After completing this course, Schact
will be eligible for a commission as
engineering ensign. He expects to be
detailed to a submarine destroyer for
active service.

lar course at the summer session."
ALUMNAE APPARENTLY ANXIOUS
TO BECOME MEMBERS OF UNION
Although undergraduate women
may be indifferent about becoming
members of the Michigan Union, this

DETKVITv UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jacksin
(April 1, gx8)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:25 a.
n., 8:ro a. m.. and hourly to 7:10 p. in., 9:1.
D). M1.
Jackson Express Cars ;local sto"- west of
Aim Arbor)-g:48 a. in. and every twA o urs
to 7:48 V. m.
Local Cars East Bound---5:35 a. .in. 6:4c
a. M.., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours io 7: 0
p. m.. 8:o p. in., 9:05 p. m., v)-'o p m
T Ypsila1ti onl ,I:'45 p. M.,12:00 a. mi.,
i : o a. m., I:2a. .m. To Sali, change at
Y'psilanti.
LocaltCars West Bound-6:oo a. m., 7:48
a. M., 10:20 V. M.. 12:20 a. m.
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $50,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
IF IT'S ANYTHING
PHOTOGRAPHIC, ASK
SWAIN
113 East University
TT L E50
means perfection in the ser-
vice of
LUNCHES and SODAS

r --

Wisconsin decided to stay in
pro-American class rather than
come Prussianized.

the
be-

SHAKESPEAREAN READING CLASS
TO GIVE "MACBETH" TONIGHT

11

t.
"
r
r
rr
14
i
r
f
FITFORM
;, '..:- , i::r loun d Mart

FITFORM SUIT.

I

I

t

I make it my business to know

TYPEWRITERS
For Sale and Rent
TYPEWRITING
Mimeographing
Fraternity and Social Stationery
0.1). MORRILL
322 South State Street
YOuT every Bank

-11

Being well dressed is easy enough
if yOU come to me for a

-

somagamommumm
.............,

good clothes. And I

chose

FIT-

Ill.

local committee is not attempt-
push the sales of stamps just
ent. Its time is largely taken
h the coming Liberty Loan. As
equence, thrift sales have fallen
elow the ebb of a few weeks
agland, a similar sale has been
ted for more than a year with
rt on the' part of the govern-.
It has been uniformly success-
r Great Britain. It needs no
17eds of students have neglect-
urchase a single Thrift stamp.
ave failed utterly to grasp the
ance of the government idea-
purchase. Immediately after,
n they will be approached by
ntatives ofntheathird Liberty
Between now and that time
ould have utilized some of their
,hange to good advantage, in
he common cause.

"Macbeth" will be presented by
the class in Shakespearean reading
at 7:30 'o'clock this evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. This is the first
of two Shakespearean plays which this
class gives every semester.
Last semester the class gave "Jul-
ius Caeser" and "The Merchant of
Venice." The comedy this semester.
will be presented near the last of the
semester and will be "Much Ado
About Nothing."
The cast varies form scene to scene
so that every member of the class will
have an opportunity to appear. About
30 will take part. The presentation
will be informal and without scenery.
Prof. R. K. Immel and Mr. S. 3. Skin-
ner have charge of the class. Ad-
mission will be free.
There is always an opportunity to
increase your business through Da.lyj
sdrertiung. Try it.-Adv.

FORM for my shop because they,
have the best

so
r

r1

ing need fulfilled at

THE
Farmers& Mechanics Bank

STYLE

I

101-105 So. Main

FIT

330 So. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

r...,.
..

III

11

SERVICE

11

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Try our
HOME-MADE
CaIndies
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
'MADE AND SOLD AT

/

11

116TE.
LIBERTY TOM CORBETT

"The Young
Mens Shop"

The SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109S..Main St

I

.. .
...

ral "Cash and Carry"
offer to
Fraternity House Stores

L
izmr-.-qIL

Corner State and

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